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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aristophanes

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  • Aristophanes Theory Of Love In The Symposium - 1,178 words
    Aristophanes' Theory Of Love In The Symposium 2. Aristophanes' Theory of love: from Plato's Symposium The love as discussed by the characters in the Symposium is homosexual love. Some assumed that homosexuality alone is capable of satisfying a mans highest and noblest aspirations. Whereas heterosexual love is placed at an inferior level, being described as only existing for carnal reasons; its ultimate purpose being procreation. There are differing views in these dialogues, Aristophanes contradicts his peers by treating heterosexuality at the same level as homosexuality, arguing that both are predestined. Aristophanes considered himself as the comic poet and he began his discourse as such. Y ...
    Related: aristophanes, symposium, true love, more important, men and women
  • Aristophanes, Plautus, And Euripides - 1,236 words
    Aristophanes, Plautus, And Euripides In times of struggle and hardship, people are constantly looking for ways to escape their reality. They have found release from their stress in practices such as exercise, therapy, and meditation. In the ancient times of Greece and Rome, life for the citizens was strict and sometimes harsh. During these times of struggle, people searched for ways to vacation from the laws that bore down upon them. One of the ways they accomplished this was through art. Art was a way to express true feeling and emotion and unite a sometimes-divided population. Drama served as one escape for the citizens in Greece and Rome. Attending the plays written by Euripides, Aristoph ...
    Related: euripides, main character, greece and rome, problems facing, sole
  • Humanitiesgrecoroman Culture Lysistrata Aristophanes Was A Craft Comedy Poet In The Fourth Century Bc During The Time Of The - 1,207 words
    Humanities/Greco-Roman Culture Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead cha ...
    Related: aristophanes, comedy, craft, greek culture, lysistrata, poet, roman culture
  • Ancient Greek Theater And Drama - 1,400 words
    Ancient Greek Theater And Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Ancient Greek Theater and Drama Jennifer Mills Theater has been an integral part of almost every society for thousands of years. Starting in the last Sixth century B.C. Theater has been evolving into the glitzy, whirlwind productions of today. But in the beginning, theater was a simple affair. Originating in Greece, theater tradition was derived from religious rituals. The ceremonies of the cult of Dionysus were exuberant; much story telling took place in the form of song and dance. Everyone would partake in the story telling, forming what is known as the chorus. The first man to step out of the chorus and take a role of a chara ...
    Related: drama, greek, greek theater, theater, excellent education
  • Christian Waugh - 728 words
    Christian Waugh The Better Half It was a great relief for me to read Aristophanes' speech in Plato's Symposium, since, as far as I'm concerned it is definitely the best speech in the book. It encompasses many aspects of love with which I readily agree, and readily embrace myself. The other speeches are good and well thought out, but they involve a variety of the aspects of love which appear to be unrelated. Aristophanes' speech presents a simple and effective solution for the problems that many of us, both ancient and modern, experience. The idea that love isn't something we can control, yet attempt to manipulate anyway, is explained in his speech. He definitely has a close, intimate touch w ...
    Related: christian, waugh, true love, real life, symposium
  • English Theatre - 639 words
    English Theatre How different cultures affected English Theater Theater unites the past and present in a unique cultural experience. Theatre continues to thrive and has become an important subject for study in schools and universities. Reaching back in time and across the world, this ranging new history draws on the latest scholarly research to describe and celebrate theatres greatest achievements over 4,500 years, from festival performances in Egypt to international multicultural theatre in the late twentieth century. English theatre has been changed by different cultures throughout the world. The Father of drama was Thesis of Athens, 535 BC, who created the first actor. The actor performed ...
    Related: english language, theatre, dr. faustus, different cultures, dionysus
  • Humanitiesgrecoroman Culture - 1,208 words
    Humanities/Greco-Roman Culture Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead cha ...
    Related: greek culture, roman culture, athenian women, role model, heroes
  • Lysistrata - 1,204 words
    Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead character of the play. It portrays ...
    Related: lysistrata, role model, internal conflict, social values, cohesiveness
  • Lysistrata - 1,204 words
    Lysistrata Aristophanes was a "craft" comedy poet in the fourth century B.C. during the time of the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes' usual style was to be too satirical, and suggesting the outlandish. He shows little mercy when mocking Socrates and his "new-fangled ideas" which were most likely designed to destroy the cohesiveness of society and lead to anarchy, in his play The Clouds. The most absurd and humorous of Aristophanes' comedies are those in which the main characters, the heroes of the story, are women. Smart women. One of the most famous of Aristophanes' comedies depicting powerfully effectual women is the Lysistrata, named after the female lead character of the play. It portrays ...
    Related: lysistrata, cultural aspect, peloponnesian war, city state, smart
  • Lysistrata - 510 words
    Lysistrata Lysistrata is a play written in 411 BC by Aristophanes. At that time in Greek history, the city-states were constantly warring with one another. Consequently, the women were left at home. One woman, Lysistrata, was so fed up with the fighting that she called all of the women of Greece to a meeting. When they finally showed up, Lysistrata presented her plan for peace: no sex until the wars ceased. She eventually convinced all of the other women that this was the only way to bring peace to the land. The men were miserable and ultimately they negotiated a treaty to stop the hostilities. This play has its merits and its downfalls. As a whole, however, it is well written, humorous, and ...
    Related: lysistrata, sleepless nights, golden age, greek life, amusing
  • Moliere - 1,468 words
    Moliere Molire Molire, pseudonym of JEAN BAPTISTE POQUELIN (1622-73), French dramatist, and one of the greatest of all writers of comedies. His universal comic types still delight audiences; his plays are often produced and have been much translated. Molire was born in Paris on January 15, 1622, the son of a wealthy tapestry maker. From an early age he was completely devoted to the theater. In 1643 he joined a theatrical company established by the Bjarts, a family of professional actors; he married one of the members of the family, Armande Bjart, in 1662. The troupe, which Molire named the Illustre Thtre, played in Paris until 1645 and then toured the provinces for 13 years, returning to Par ...
    Related: moliere, divine right, royal society, century literature, misanthrope
  • Platos Phaedo - 1,333 words
    Plato's Phaedo Beth Kirkpatrick 1 October 13, 2000 Dr. Meadors Phaedo Plato: Concerning Souls, The World of Forms, and Particulars Phaedo, written by Plato, is intended to be an account of the final moments of Socrates' life as he is preparing to be put to death for poisoning the minds of the youth of Athens. Socrates proceeds to explain to his followers that there is a soul and his reasoning. Plato employed the conversational structure as a way of presenting dialogue. He used Socrates in this pattern of argumentation to examine each issue from several perspectives using speculation from Socrates' peers. This explored the interplay of alternative ideas while subjecting all of them to evaluat ...
    Related: phaedo, judeo christian, sensory perception, beth, retreat
  • Socrates - 1,786 words
    Socrates Socrates: A Great Philosopher Kimberly Whitaker Honors Survey of World History: HONR 1151 Dr. Veula J. Rhodes, Instructor Albany State University November 22, 1999 Foreword Thesis: Exploring Socrates and his philosophies give the seeker a new understanding of the life and society in which Socrates lived. With this new understanding, one can compare or contrast other views of the period. In doing this, the researcher is provided with a map of ideas and philosophies throughout history. This map can be used to enhance our present understanding of past cultures. I. Introduction II. The early life of Socrates III. Problem of Socrates IV. Philosophical ideas and techniques A. Universal de ...
    Related: philosophy socrates, socrates, unexamined life, ancient greece, drinking
  • Socrates - 493 words
    Socrates The life of the Greek philosopher Socrates (469-399 BC) marks such a critical point in Western thought that standard histories divide Greek philosophy into pre-Socratic and post-Socratic periods. Socrates left no writings of his own, and his work has inspired almost as many different interpretations as there have been interpreters. He remains one of the most important and one of the most enigmatic figures in Western philosophy. As a young man Socrates became fascinated with the new scientific ideas that Anaxagoras and the latter's associate Archelaus had introduced to Athens. He seems for a time to have been the leader of an Athenian research circle--which would explain why the firs ...
    Related: socrates, human nature, greek philosophy, western philosophy, socratic
  • Socrates - 1,219 words
    Socrates At the elderly age of seventy, Socrates found himself fighting against an indictment of impiety. He was unsuccessful at trial in the year 399 B.C. The charges were corrupting the youth of Athens, not believing in the traditional gods in whom the city believed, and finally, that he believed in other new divinities. In Platos Apology, Socrates defends himself against these charges. He claims that the jurors opinions are biased because they had probably all seen Aristophanes comedy The Clouds. The Socrates portrayed in Aristophanes Clouds is an altogether different character than that of the Apology. The two different impressions of Socrates lead to quite opposite opinions with regard ...
    Related: socrates, falls short, free will, different perspective, lacking
  • Socrates Trial - 1,202 words
    Socrates' Trial Socrates' First Accusers and Athenian Law Of all confrontations in political philosophy, the biggest is the conflict between philosophy and politics. The problem remains making philosophy friendly to politics. The questioning of authoritative opinions is not easily accomplished nor is that realm of philosophy - the pursuit of wisdom. Socrates was the instigator of the conflict. While the political element takes place within opinions about political life, Socrates asks the question What is the best regime and how should I live? Ancient thought is riddled with unknowns and can make no such statement as how should I live. The Socratic philosophy offers an alternative and prepare ...
    Related: fair trial, socrates, trial, socratic dialogue, political thought
  • The History Of Pi - 1,216 words
    Pi The History of Pi A little known verse in the bible reads And he made a molten sea, ten cubits from the one brim to the other; it was round all about, and his height was five cubits; and a line of thirty cubits did compass it about(I Kings 7, 23). This passage from the bible demonstrates the ancient nature of the irrational number pi. Pi in fact is mentioned in a number of verses throughout the bible. In II Chronicles 4,2, in the passage describing the building of the great temple of Solomon which was built around 950BC, pi is given as equal to three. This value is not very accurate at all and should not even be considered accurate for its time, however it should be noted that precision w ...
    Related: history, modern history, ancient greeks, great temple, pacific
  • The Slaughter House Five - 5,060 words
    ... rm of authority, and therefore it is capable of the same or greater evils. How many atrocities have been justified by the claim that God is on our side? - DEATH People are dying constantly in Slaughterhouse-Five, and of course the destruction of Dresden brought death on a massive scale. Vonnegut follows every mention of death with that familiar phrase, So it goes. In this way he attempts to find a saner attitude toward death by emphasizing that death is a common aspect of human existence. Billy Pilgrim finds consolation in the Tralfamadorian notion that people who are dead in the present remain alive in the times of their past. Perhaps the author is saying that we too should be consoled: ...
    Related: slaughter, slaughter house, cape cod, kurt vonnegut, adding
  • Theater And Drama In Ancient Greece Took Form In About 5th - 1,176 words
    ... This was called "deus ex machina", which means god from the machine, and was a technical device that used a metal crane on top of the skene building, which contained the dressing rooms, from which a dummy was suspended to represent a god. This device was first employed by Euripides to give a miraculous conclusion to a tragedy. In later romantic literature, this device was no longer used and the miracles supplied by it were replace by the sudden appearance of a rich uncle, the discovery or new wills, or of infants changed at birth. Many proprieties of the Greek plays were attached to violence. Therefore, it was a rule that acts of violence must take place off stage. This carried through ...
    Related: ancient greece, drama, greece, greek theater, theater
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