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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: literary device

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  • Ache Of Marriage - 714 words
    Ache Of Marriage In "The Ache of Marriage," Denise Levertov attempts to explain the pain this marriage experiences. It is a pain that affects both emotional and physical states of being. Levertov describes the pain as if someone were reading her thoughts. Through Levertov's use of non-conventional form, the theme of the pain of marriage and overcoming that pain jumps from the page. The author divides the poem into two parts. On one hand, Levertov shows the difficulty in making a marriage last. She depicts how a marriage can ache and hurt. On the other hand, Levertov says that a blissful marriage as the ultimate goal. All the trial and tribulations a marriage endures prove to be worth it the ...
    Related: ache, ultimate goal, free verse, literary device, clever
  • Anais Nin - 1,631 words
    Anais Nin Anais Nin was a passionate woman, not only in her works but also in her life. The fact that she lived life to the fullest is what made her books so intriguing. Although her diaries were a chronicle of her experience, her fiction showed the reader sides of her while displaying everyone's innermost desires. In her own words Nin says, "the role of the writer is not to say what we can all say, but what we are unable to say" (Rollins), and she does exactly that. For this reason her works take one on a journey through one's soul and allows the pondering which may never have been considered. This feeling of self discovery is quite powerful and erotic; the enpowerment supplies a feeling of ...
    Related: ethan frome, good company, literary device, surrealism, walsh
  • Aristotles Tragedy - 1,488 words
    Aristotle`s Tragedy Defining a Tragedy Greek philosopher Aristotle proposes components of an ideal tragedy in his work, Tragedy and the Emotions of Pity and Fear. According to Aristotle, there are six components of a great tragedy: plot, character, thought, verbal expression, song, and visual adornment. He dissects these components in great detail and provides standards for all of them. In his play Bacchae, Euripides resembles much of Aristotles components of an ideal tragedy. Euripides has only few deviations from the Aristotelian tragedy. To Aristotle, a tragedy is defined as an imitation of action and life, not of an imitation of men. Therefore, he places higher emphasis the role of plot ...
    Related: greek tragedy, tragedy, literary device, divine intervention, euripides
  • Clarissa Dalloway - 467 words
    Clarissa Dalloway Virginia Woolf creates interesting contrast within the character of Clarissa Dalloway using stream of consciousness narration in her novel Mrs. Dalloway. Clarissas inner thoughts reveal a contrast between her lack of attraction to her husband due to her lesbian feelings and her fear of loosing him as a social stepping stone. These contrasts and many others can be seen throughout the novel using the literary device of stream of consciousness narration. Clarissas character reveals to us early in the book her lack of attraction to her husband. This revelation can be seen in the passage that states: "...through some contraction of this cold spirit, she had failed him...she coul ...
    Related: clarissa, clarissa dalloway, dalloway, mrs dalloway, mrs. dalloway
  • Critics On Slaughter Housefive - 865 words
    CRITICS ON SLAUGHTER HOUSE-FIVE Slaughter house-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut is a post modern novel, attempting to undermine the reader's expectations. The novel does not have smooth transitions from one event to the next. The reason is, because the novel reflects modern man's life. Since the novel is not smooth it is confusing. This is just like modern man's life, confusing. Another literary device is, it is difficult to follow. When the novel is hard to read the reader cannot enjoy and understand the book. This is how modern society is too(difficult to follow). Another literary device is the novel's characters lack depth. The characters need more descriptive details. This reflects man by ...
    Related: slaughter, slaughter house, literary device, modern life, correspondent
  • Critics On Slaughter Housefive - 865 words
    CRITICS ON SLAUGHTER HOUSE-FIVE Slaughter house-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut is a post modern novel, attempting to undermine the reader's expectations. The novel does not have smooth transitions from one event to the next. The reason is, because the novel reflects modern man's life. Since the novel is not smooth it is confusing. This is just like modern man's life, confusing. Another literary device is, it is difficult to follow. When the novel is hard to read the reader cannot enjoy and understand the book. This is how modern society is too(difficult to follow). Another literary device is the novel's characters lack depth. The characters need more descriptive details. This reflects man by ...
    Related: slaughter, slaughter house, different situations, kurt vonnegut, modernism
  • Critics On Slaughter Housefive Slaughter Housefive, Written By Kurt Vonnegut Is A Post Modern Novel, Attempting To Undermine - 865 words
    CRITICS ON SLAUGHTER HOUSE-FIVE Slaughter house-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut is a post modern novel, attempting to undermine the reader's expectations. The novel does not have smooth transitions from one event to the next. The reason is, because the novel reflects modern man's life. Since the novel is not smooth it is confusing. This is just like modern man's life, confusing. Another literary device is, it is difficult to follow. When the novel is hard to read the reader cannot enjoy and understand the book. This is how modern society is too(difficult to follow). Another literary device is the novel's characters lack depth. The characters need more descriptive details. This reflects man by ...
    Related: attempting, kurt, kurt vonnegut, modern life, modern society, post modern, slaughter
  • Earnest Hemmingway - 752 words
    Earnest Hemmingway Ernest Hemingway Ernest Miller Heminway, the second of six children, was born on July 21, 1899 at his grandfather's house in Oak Park, Chicago. His family then moved to Bear Lake, where he spent his first years. It was here that he caught his first fish at the age of three. At the age of six, his granfather died, leaving the family the large home where Ernest was born. It was here, in Oak Park, that Ernest grew up. His father taught him all about nature and the out doors, some of his teachings included; how to build fires, how to cook in the open, how to use an axe, and how to make bullets. Physical endurance and courage were also highly valued characteristics. This kind o ...
    Related: earnest, hemmingway, in another country, another country, reproduction
  • English - 1,044 words
    English Review of Shakespear's "The Tempest" Why is it that people fawn Shakespeare and have unreasonably high reguard for his works, including The Tempest, and label them as"immortal classics"? Indeed Shakespeares works had great significance in the evolution of English literature, but these works, including The Tempest are mostly devoid of significance and literary value in the present day. One can expect to gain little educational benefit of the english language or hightened apreciation for fine literature from the reading of Shakespeares titles for reasons enumerate. First of all, the colorful and sophisticated metephoric vernacular style of the language utilized is archaic; even the spe ...
    Related: english language, english literature, modern english, literary device, twentieth century
  • Explication Of William Blakes Poem London - 1,525 words
    Explication Of William Blakes Poem London Explication of William Blake's "London" William Blake's poem "London" takes a complex look at life in London, England during the late seventeen hundreds into the early eighteen hundreds as he lived and experienced it. Blake's use of ambiguous and double meaning words makes this poem both complex and interesting. Through the following explication I will unravel these complexities to show how this is an interesting poem. To better understand this poem some history about London during the time the poem was written is helpful. London was the ". . . undisputed cultural, economic, religious, educational, and political center" of England in the seventeen an ...
    Related: explication, london, london england, poem, william blake
  • Faces Of The Diamond - 1,287 words
    Faces Of The Diamond Faces of the Diamond - Essay on The Diamond as big as the Ritz "Diamond ... was designed utterly for my own amusement. I was in a mood characterized by a perfect craving for luxury, and the story began as an attempt to feed that craving on imaginary foods." Craving is a strong, urgent and persistent desire. According to Buddhist teachings, desire is the root to all the sufferings and injustices in the world. If it were the goal of mankind to abandon their desires for excessive needs, the world would be a peaceful and harmonious place. Throughout history, there had also been great prophets such as Isaiah and other outstanding preachers who made daring attempts to convert ...
    Related: diamond, american society, small town, george washington, ears
  • Hamlets Soliloquies - 613 words
    Hamlet's Soliloquies Xan Hamlet's Soliloquies Mankind has told stories throughout the generations, fascinating and enthralling one another with tales of woe, humour and passion. The power of a story has always lain primarily within our desire to observe characters that we can relate to, believe in and understand. That is perhaps the area in which Shakespeare's works have always excelled, as he masterfully utilizes numerous devices to draw the audience into his character's minds. The most prominent example of this is his frequent use of soliloquies throughout what is possible his greatest work, Hamlet. This play so effectively blends soliloquies into it's dialogue that the audience is treated ...
    Related: prince hamlet, tragic hero, uncle claudius, literary device, rage
  • Homer - 858 words
    Homer The Odyssey is one of only a few epics still in existence today. An epic is a long narrative poem which focuses on the lives and struggles of a great hero or heroes. Homer used many literary techniques to make his poetry more fully understood. He was very versed in his Greek gods and uses them as great heroes. The Odyssey was written approximately 2500 years ago. Top scholars have spent much time attempting to confirm who created these epics, The Odyssey and The Iliad, when they were written, and where they were written. These scholars have made their educated guesses, however they are not all in agreement as to exactly where these two masterpieces have come from. Today scholars are st ...
    Related: homer, narrative poem, literary techniques, holy bible, grecian
  • Imagery - 2,396 words
    IMAGERY The term imagery has various applications. Generally, imagery includes all kinds of sense perception (not just visual pictures). In a more limited application, the term describes visible objects only. But the term is perhaps most commonly used to describe figurative language, which is as a theme in literature. An example is animal imagery in Othello When Iago tortures Othello with animal images of his wife's supposed infidelity, "were they as prime as goats, as hot as monkeys" (3.3.403), his description so overcomes the Moor that later, in greeting Lodovico, he suddenly blurts out, "Goats and monkeys!" (4.1.256). SIMILE A direct, expressed comparison between two things essentially un ...
    Related: imagery, love song of j alfred prufrock, king herod, dylan thomas, literature
  • In A New England Nun, Mary E Wilkins Freeman Depicts The Life Of The Classic New England Spinster The Image Of A Spinster Is - 1,718 words
    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife. This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary. Both comparisons are of restriction and fear of freedom. The animals and the woman of this story are irreversible tamed by their captivity, and no longer crave freedom. Ideas of sin guilt and atonement are also ...
    Related: classic, domestic life, freeman, married life, mary, new england, wilkins
  • Looking Inside The Hollow Men - 1,673 words
    Looking Inside The Hollow Men A Look Inside "The Hollow Men" Eliot, a master of the written craft, carefully thought out each aspect of his 1925 poem "The Hollow Men." Many differences in interpretation exist for Eliot's complex poetry. One issue never debated is the extensive range of things to consider in his TS Eliot's writing. Because TS Eliot often intertwined his writing by having one piece relate to another "The Hollow Men" is sometimes considered a mere appendage to The Waste Land. "The Hollow Men," however, proves to have many offerings for a reader in and among itself. The epigraph contains two pertinent references (http). First, "Mistah Kurtz - he dead" is an allusion to Conrad's ...
    Related: hollow, university press, heart of darkness, important role, online
  • Njals Saga: A Fictional Account Of Early Iceland - 1,980 words
    Njal's Saga: A Fictional Account Of Early Iceland Njal's Saga: A Fictional Account of Early Iceland "The origin and evolution of saga writing in Iceland are largely matters for speculation. A common pastime on Icelandic farms, from the 12th century down to modern times, was the reading aloud of stories to entertain the household, known as sagnaskemmtun ("saga entertainment"). It seems to have replaced the traditional art of storytelling" (Hermann Palsson, pg. 1). Njal's Saga uses Old Icelandic writing convention and historical data to give a fictional account of a generation's lifestyle and struggles. Icelandic literature has become very valuable because historians have realized the great am ...
    Related: fictional, iceland, law enforcement, country people, icelandic
  • Paradise - 748 words
    Paradise Lost By Milton And Hell Thesis: In Paradise Lost, Milton creates a Hell that is easily imagined through his use of concrete images, powerful diction, and serious tone. I. Paradise Lost is a great epic A. "John Milton....a dedicated figure, in the seventeenth-century English literature" (Diaches 390). B. Paradise Lost is considered to be "a triumph beyond which, in its own kind, the force of English poetry could no farther go" (Hopkins 153). C. In Paradise Lost, Milton creates a Hell that is easily imagined through his use of concrete images, powerful diction, and serious tone. II. Concrete images are used by Milton to create a Hell that is easily imagined. A. "With ... eyes / That s ...
    Related: paradise, paradise lost, critical history, english literature, seventeenth
  • Poes Use Of Diction - 1,143 words
    Poe's Use Of Diction Born in 1809, losing his parents and contact with his siblings before the age of three, Edgar Allen Poe had no idea that he was destined to be a great writer. Before he mysteriously died in 1849, he wrote many tales, including poems and short stories, which immortalized his name. The Raven was one of Poe's greatest poems that brought him much fame. Poe's The Raven displays his poetical prowess through the use of his method to writing, diction and literary techniques. Like others held in the spotlight, Poe's talent and works were analyzed by critics. A few critics thought his popularity was just luck; however, other critics acknowledged Poe's intellect. Poe, in response t ...
    Related: diction, edgar allen, last word, drink alcohol, stability
  • Scarlet Letter Symbolism - 1,910 words
    Scarlet Letter Symbolism Symbolism of The Scarlet Letter A symbol is a literary device which is employed to portray another object or individual. In the Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, it is most often a tangible object he uses to represent an undefined idea, complex in scope and significance. More times than not, it represents reverent, profound, or virtuous concepts of merit. From the substitution of one idea or object for another, to creations as massive, complex, and perplexing as the veil in the Minister's Black veil, are the domain symbols may encompass. Hawthorne's notable and unique use of the inanimate letter A, the scenery of the rose bush, and the settings of forest to make ...
    Related: scarlet, scarlet letter, symbolism, the scarlet letter, evil spirit
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