Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: limb

  • 134 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • The Civil Strife And Chaos That Had Torn Russia Limb From Limb In The Early 20th Century, Although Brutally Devastating, Did - 1,182 words
    The civil strife and chaos that had torn Russia limb from limb in the early 20th Century, although brutally devastating, did not hail the end of the stability and power that had characterized the massive country for so much of history. The continuing strength of what was now the Soviet Union lay in the newly formed support structure provided by Socialist Realism, a force that directed the awareness of, and the arts produced by, the Soviet people. The ideals of Socialist Realism deified Lenin and Marx, attributed the Bolshevik ranks with heroism undaunted by overwhelming opposition, and directed the proletariat towards a better future through reconstruction and industrialization of the state. ...
    Related: chaos, civil war, limb, russia, russian civil, russian civil war, torn
  • The Civil Strife And Chaos That Had Torn Russia Limb From Limb In The Early 20th Century, Although Brutally Devastating, Did - 1,173 words
    ... st Realist films was Chapaev, based on the aforementioned novel by Furmanov. It remains the most popular Socialist Realist film ever made. As in the Furmanov's novel, Vasilii Chapaev is portrayed as a socialist hero whose successful exploits glorify the ideals of the Party. Chapaev was exactly the cinematic model that Stalin was hoping for, and he praised it as the formula that all subsequent films should follow. The filmmaker Eisenstein didn't reach instant success as the creator of Chapaev did, for Eisenstein was reluctant to replace his previous cinematic style with that of the burgeoning socialist era. His films, which focused primarily on life in Russia before the revolution and thu ...
    Related: chaos, civil war, limb, russia, torn
  • A Dolls House And Tess Of The Durbevilles - 497 words
    A Doll's House and Tess of the D'Urbevilles A Doll's House and Tess of the D'Urbevilles During the late nineteenth century, women were beginning to break out from the usual molds. Two authors from that time period wrote two separate but very similar pieces of literature. Henrik Ibsen wrote the play A Doll's House, and Thomas Hardy wrote Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Ibsen and Hardy both use the male characters to contrast with their female counterparts to illustrate how women are stronger by following their hearts instead of their minds. Ibsen uses Torvald, to depict a world where men choose to follow their minds in place of their hearts. Ibsen has Torvald believe that he is truly in love with ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, tess, tess of the d'urbervilles, nineteenth century
  • A Separate Peace - 414 words
    A Separate Peace A Separate Peace by John Knowles is a complex novel that portrays war in many different forms. Gene Forrester was attending Devon School during World War II. This was a representation of different wars he was having within himself. Gene was feeling a kind of jealousy toward his friend Finny. He also felt like Finny was trying to sabotage him with relation to his schoolwork. Lastly Gene felt guilt, guilt from what was described by him as a "blind impulse" and also from having the truth revealed to him resulting in a fatal accident. Gene fought with his fears throughout the story. He thought that he was a complete person, full of what a man should be, but when he got to Devon ...
    Related: separate peace, john knowles, book reports, different forms, remorse
  • A Separate Peace - 768 words
    A Separate Peace Breaking The Mold In John Knowle's, A Separate Peace, there is a transformation in all the key elements in the book, from the rivers to the tree to the seasons to the characters. The transformation is specifically seen in Leper, Gene, and Phineas. These three young men experience a change not just because of the transitions through adolescence. These changes also come about because of the war, the school, and an injury. Leper Lepellier is a very odd young man. He is quiet and is finds himself always taken by surprise. He really is not popular and that does not concern him in any way. Leper really has no true friends at the Devon school, but talks to Gene. He entertains himse ...
    Related: separate peace, john knowles, lonely, collecting
  • A Separate Peace Thematic Analysis - 765 words
    A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis A Separate Peace - Thematic Analysis An analysis of John Knowles A Separate Peace brings up the theme of man's inhumanity to his fellow man. What makes this novel unique is that in protesting war, Knowles never overtly referred to the blood and gore of war; he showed the consequences of war, some paralleling the nature of war and some simply laying out how World War II affected noncombatants thousand miles away. There have been many books written about war, what happens, why it happens, and why wars should stop. Knowles explains through the life of Finny why war never will cease, with only one death in the entire book; a quiet one at that. When Gene is re ...
    Related: separate peace, thematic, thematic analysis, world peace, ideal society
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • A Seperate Peace - 1,304 words
    A Seperate Peace In Knowles novel, A Separate Peace, Gene is portrayed as an intelligent student who is motivated by academics. He is also a thinker that considers a situation from all sides before making a decision. Gene is also a person who follows all the rules and regulations. He always obeys his teachers, studies hard, never misses a class, and makes excellent grades. He does not really enjoy sports, for he is not a good athlete. While in school he lets many distractions such as his friend Finny take part in his life. This leads to his internal wars. Finny is Genes roommate and best friend, who has a completely opposite personality from Gene. He always acts on blind impulse, never think ...
    Related: separate peace, seperate, seperate peace, real world, best friend
  • Abortion - 1,028 words
    Abortion Abortion As of right now, abortion is legal in all nine months of the pregnancy for any reason. This controversial issue is a question of how important the value of life is. The turning point came in 1973 when the Supreme Court's decision in Roe vs. Wade saying, that women have the right to murder an innocent child only up to 24 weeks. This false perception is fueled part by groups supporting abortion rights and it is then uncritically unaccepted by the media. The fact is that the current law allows a woman to get an abortion for any reason she deems necessary. It seems ironic that a people can get so emotional when it comes to animal rights, yet see no wrong in ripping a developed ...
    Related: abortion, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, animal rights, controversial issue
  • Abortion - 1,964 words
    Abortion One of the most controversial topics over the years, and still today, is abortion. Is abortion murder or not? When does a fetus become a human? There are no answers to these questions. Everyone individual has their own beliefs on whether or not abortion is justifiable. Abortions have been performed throughout many of centuries. Recently, there has been a number of court cases that has changed the legality of abortions, especially in the United States, for example Roe v. Wade. Even religions have changed their views on abortions over the course of the years. In the abortions wars there are two parties, pro-life and pro-choice. Pro-life believes that abortion is murder and is complete ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, stress disorder
  • Abortion - 966 words
    Abortion A womans right or murder? The topic I chose was abortion ~ a womans right or murder? I set out to interview a various range of citizens and professionals about this topic and to listen to their views. Abortion is a very personal and controversial topic especially in todays society. I did not expect to get an accurate answer to my topic, but rather two or even more very different sides to this study. I do not have a particular view on this issue, so I did aim to see if my mind could be made clearer from my interviews. I was expecting the communication to be very formal and hard to find people who knew exactly what their views are and able to comment on them easily. I did a lot of res ...
    Related: abortion, legal system, unborn child, short term, oppose
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn By Twain - 661 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn By Twain Mark Twains novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a perfect example of how ones heart and morals can change in difficult situations. Hucks journey down the Mississippi River tested him to his limits of being able to handle situations in the way which he had been raised. Huck shows that how one is raised is something that will impact them tremendously in the rest of their life and that it is hard to change from what youve been molded into. Early in the novel Huck shows how much of a rebellious and joking boy he truly is. "I put out the light and I scrambled out of the window...,"(pg. 17) says Huck. Huck, at a young age, began getting himself into many di ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, twain
  • Adventurism In Human Nature - 843 words
    Adventurism In Human Nature Human history is littered with example where a few individual risked life and limbs to venture into the unknown, which then came to be discovered, thanks to their spirit of adventurism or as some would say, fool hardy bravado. Of course, certain names come to mind, Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, Lois and Clark etc. There is another side to this tale of fame as well. Even the success stories sometimes had a ring of failure about itself. A person might be a pioneer in the field of discovery but the fruits of his labor are enjoyed by those who follow him. He might in fact have served as an expendable instrument in the road to discovery, in the big schemes ...
    Related: human history, human nature, human spirit, to build a fire, captain james cook
  • American Dream - 847 words
    American Dream America, our great country, is strong, powerful, and influential. Americans exemplify positive values, selflessness, hospitality, and the American way of life. The mighty oak tree that stands taller, bigger, and older than all others best represents this grand country. Each part of the tree illustrates a facet of our nation. Shapely emerald leaves covering the tree symbolize the values many Americans hold concerning themselves, others, and their nation. Leaves help the tree grow and flourish just as our value of caring for our neighbors help us to unite and become more successful as a whole. The beautiful shade and distinct shape of these leaves make the tree more attractive a ...
    Related: american, american dream, american life, american values, dream
  • Anesthetics - 1,467 words
    ... amount of side effects. Throughout the country there are many different types of anesthetics used. Some of the most popular anesthetics are used in U.S. hospitals across the region. Among general anesthetics, cyclopropane, ethylene, and halothane are the most popular. Cyclopropane and ethylene are used with caution because they are highly explosive. Halothane is the most prefered over the three because it is neither inflammable or explosive. Amongst intravenous anesthesia, Pentothal sodium is the most popular. This is because it produces the least amount of side effects during and after a surgical procedure. Block anesthesia is the most common and popular of the group known as local anes ...
    Related: different types, new england, side effects, concentration, 1984
  • Antisemitism Influence - 2,194 words
    ... od alone operating from within, and not of man working-or rather playing-from without. If these offences be taken away, worse will follow. For they are thus given over by the wrath of God to reprobation, that they may become incorrigible, as Ecclesiastes says, for every one who is incorrigible is rendered worse rather than better by correction. Farewell in the Lord; pardon my words, and pray the Lord for my sinning soul." "Martin Luther's to George Spalatin," from Luthers Correspondence and Other Contemporary, Letters, trans. by P. Smith (1913), Vol. 1, pp. 28-29. www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1514luther.html So we see he was absolutely determined that the Jews would and should convert to ...
    Related: antisemitism, lord jesus, german people, the bible, omitted
  • Assisted Suicide - 1,178 words
    Assisted Suicide Over the past ten to twenty years a big issue has been made over a person1s right to commit suicide or not. The American courts have had to deal with everything from assisted suicides to planned suicides, and whether the constitution gives the American people the right to take their own lives or whether it says they have the power to allow someone else to take their lives. They have had to determine in some cases whether or not homicide charges needed to be brought up and others times whether or not it was done for an underlying reason such as insurance fraud. There are several aspects to suicide and the law, but we are only going to discuss a few of them. First of all we wi ...
    Related: assisted suicide, suicide, right to life, family member, terminally
  • Babi Yar Analysis Of The Poem - 998 words
    Babi Yar - Analysis of the Poem Yevtushenko speaks in first person throughout the poem. This creates the tone of him being in the shoes of the Jews. As he says in lines 63-64, "No Jewish blood is mixed in mine, but let me be a Jew . . . " He writes the poem to evoke compassion for the Jews and make others aware of their hardships and injustices. "Only then can I call myself Russian." (lines 66-67). The poet writes of a future time when the Russian people realize that the Jews are people as well accept them as such. If you hate the Jews, he asks, why not hate me as well? True peace and unity will only occur when they have accepted everyone, including the Jews. Stanza I describes the forest of ...
    Related: babi yar, poem, first person, anne frank, atrocities
  • Babylonian Civilization - 1,516 words
    Babylonian Civilization Babylonian Civilization What was the Babylonian civilization? What was so great about this particular civilization anyways? Babylonia was a civilization that had a way of life that was so effective that it underwent relatively little change for some 1200 years. In the following essay, I will be discussing their daily life, their economy, government, the people and society, arts, and religion, to show why and how their way of life was so effective. Daily life in Babylonia was very "down-to-earth". Law and justice were key concepts in the Babylonian way of life. People did a lot of farming in this ancient civilization. Each day people would go to work for a living. The ...
    Related: babylonian, civilization, legal rights, law and justice, arranged
  • 134 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>