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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: liberal democracy

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  • Adolf Hitler - 1,870 words
    Adolf Hitler For the past week I have been researching three men, Joseph Stalin, Mao, and Adolf Hitler for an answer to a question; who is the most evil? Which, means that I had to think about what exactly was evil for me. Now the dictionary they have a simple definition for it, which is: morally reprehensible, sinful, wicked. But there could be so many different meanings, because there are many different people in the world. So, these three men were judged on my definition of evil. Evil to me is someone who consciously knows what there doing but still doesnt care, someone who purposely tries to cause destruction on other people, one who possibly thinks that they are somewhat of a messiah, a ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, vienna hitler, right to vote
  • Australian Bicameralism - 1,252 words
    Australian Bicameralism Australian Bicameralism. Bicameralism in Australia has a long history dating back to the pre-Federation colonial parliaments. These structures, in turn, evolved from their British forbear, the parliament at Westminster. At federal and state levels there has been considerable debate and controversy over the continuing efficacy and efficiency of the two-house model. Is it necessary or desirable to maintain two houses of parliament for state and federal governments in Australia? Did the Queensland government do the right thing in abolishing its upper house? What is the future of bicameralism in Australia? These are some of the questions that this essay will seek to addre ...
    Related: australian, australian government, party system, proportional representation, limit
  • Colonization Within France - 1,383 words
    Colonization within France Weber, Eugen. Peasants into Frenchmen: The Modernization of Rural France 1870-1914. Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press. 1976. The nineteenth century witnessed a massive amount of change on almost all levels. The birth of liberal democracy during the French Revolution continued to expand as the growing middle classes demanded more political power to be equal with the economic clout. Nationalism began to play a significant role in the way people and countries viewed themselves. The flourishing Industrial Revolution is what gave rise to the middle class as they were about to use the technological advances in transportation, communications, and the production of energy to ...
    Related: colonization, france, popular culture, french revolution, warm
  • Democracy Movements In China - 2,323 words
    ... 1989 democracy movement enjoyed great popular support. Student groups received food and other supplies and money. People saw more and more corruption amongst the party elite and were angered by falling wages and living standards despite party promises to the contrary. Meisner paints a picture of China at this time which shows a country in moral chaos. The government had basically lost control of officials in the southern coastal regions where there was cut-throat competition for scarce raw materials. Officials had access to supplies at low state-regulated prices, and they caused there to be an overproduction of consumer goods, while necessities were in short supply. Basically, the econo ...
    Related: china, democracy, liberal democracy, standard of living, government officials
  • Foreign Aid - 1,654 words
    Foreign Aid Since the 90's, the Western governments have increased their interest in funding civil society in Africa to promote democratization. This discussion paper examines how a range of foreign donors, including Western Governments, multilateral agencies and Non- Governmental Organizations (NGO's) have developed "civil society" in Ghana, South Africa and Uganda. Other important assistance comes from Civil Society Organizations (CSO's) to assist in basic provisions for food health and shelters. The three countries discussed in this essay are viewed as models by the Western World since they are amongst the African nations that receive the most foreign aid. For example, in 1995 South Afric ...
    Related: foreign aid, human rights, michigan state, important role, democratization
  • Hobbes And Locke - 1,767 words
    Hobbes And Locke Hobbes and Locke Outcome 2 . Thomas Hobbes was born in Wiltshire, England in 1588 just prior to the Spanish Armada. Philosophy is defined by Hobbes as the reasoned knowledge of effects from causes, and causes from effects. Hobbes was educated in Oxford where he learnt about the great classics and also of Aristotle, however Hobbes disliked Aristotles approach that democracy was the best form of government. Hobbes spent many a year on the continent and his disliking for Aristotles works grew, when he returned to Britain there was a civil war underway so he left the country again and wrote several pieces of literature, these include the, De Cive and The Elements of law. Later o ...
    Related: hobbes, john locke, locke, locke hobbes, thomas hobbes
  • How Far Do We In Britain Live In A Democracy - 1,130 words
    How Far Do We In Britain Live In A Democracy? The definition of democracy is 'rule by the people', or 'the power of the people'. The 'demos' comes from the ancient Greek, it is the people and 'kratos' is to rule. Democracy today has come to mean the decisions arrived by the majority (or a simple majority), the right of every citizen to vote and hold office, and the duty of all citizens to participate actively in the system. So in an undefined sense, political power is ultimately in the hands of the whole adult population, and no smaller group has the right to rule. But only when democracy is qualified by other words, such as liberal, representative and direct, can it take on a more useful me ...
    Related: britain, democracy, direct democracy, liberal democracy, power over
  • How Far Do We In Britain Live In A Democracy - 1,114 words
    ... ey act will effect whether they get voted into power again. And it is possible for an individual to have their voice heard as specific interests can go into parliament through lobbying through an MP. A parties policies are very clearly laid out before an election, you know what values you are voting for when you hand over your power. And most importantly, because of a representative democracy, representatives have a close attachment with their constituency. They will be there frequently, holding surgeries and be expected to answer mail from their constituents. Linking back to the liberal democracy, in Britain, the way that it works is through the parliamentary system, so it is known as p ...
    Related: athenian democracy, britain, democracy, direct democracy, liberal democracy
  • In The Following Assignment, I Will Discuss The Issue Of Native Sovereignty In Canada, And Address The Question Can Native So - 1,257 words
    In the following assignment, I will discuss the issue of native sovereignty in Canada, and address the question; "Can native sovereignty coexist with Canadian sovereignty?" To answer this question I will summarize two articles that discuss the issue. The first by John A. Olthius and Roger Townshend entitled "The Case for Native Sovereignty", and the second, by Thomas Flanagan, entitled "Native Sovereignty: Does Anyone Really want an Aboriginal Archipelago?" I will be taking the position against the coexistence of native sovereignty with Canadian sovereignty. These two articles will help me support my position on the issue. Olthius and Townshend are in favour of native sovereignty within Cana ...
    Related: native, native people, sovereignty, aboriginal people, european nations
  • Karl Marx - 1,055 words
    Karl Marx Full Text: COPYRIGHT 1998 M.E. Sharpe Inc. I had the good fortune of meeting Eric Hobsbawm in London while I was writing this review. He gave me a copy of the edition cited above with his striking introduction. It is one of several pieces that I have come across commemorating the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of The Communist Manifesto. Probably there are many more. Marx and Engels were thirty and twenty-eight when the Manifesto was published in an infinitesimal German edition in February 1848. A tiny group of workers and intellectuals, the League of the Communists, had commissioned a statement of principles late in 1847. It was approved at a meeting in London a few months later ...
    Related: karl, karl marx, marx, atomic bomb, political parties
  • Kyrgyzstan - 761 words
    Kyrgyzstan The collapse of the Soviet Union created 15 new states. These states over the last 5 years have all struggled with economic, ethnic, political and territorial problems left to them by the Soviet empire. Kyrgyzstan, is a former Soviet Republic (FSR) located in the Central Asia. This paper will give a statistical representation of the state, Kyrgyzstan. The statistical data will reflect the basic geography of the subject country containing population, size and location. This miniature report will also contain brief descriptions of current political and economic situations. Included in the current information section of this report, is an outlook for possible near future events conce ...
    Related: collapse of the soviet union, political spectrum, environmental concerns, highlight, floor
  • Market Economy Vs Command Economy - 1,216 words
    ... moderately each year and safely meet, but not noticeably exceed, their assigned production assignments: In other words, they ratcheted up production one notch each year. (Dyker, 1992, P26) In a similar fashion, centrally assigned production goals discouraged Soviet management from developing or employing technological innovations. (Dyker, 1992, P29) The excessive emphasis on central planning discouraged both managerial and technological innovation, as a consequence of this emphasis on steady mediocrity, and an excessive emphasis on centrally assigned production goals, a style of management that encouraged complacency and consistency at the expense of productivity and innovation developed ...
    Related: command, command economy, economy, free market, market, market economy
  • Perceptions Of Islam - 728 words
    Perceptions Of Islam How the West Perceives Islam and what Mazrui thinks is the Reality Most Westerners tend to view the Islamic societies as somewhat backward in their beliefs according to Mazrui. Commonly Westerners believe that this is due to the oppressed religious beliefs of Islamic's. They also believe that the Islamic society is governed inhumanely in comparison to the enlightened, well-rounded democracy of the Western world. However the measurement of cultural differences between the West and Islam is somewhat complex, and the differences between the two is narrower than assumed by most Western beliefs. Islam is not considered just a religion, and most certainly is not just a fundame ...
    Related: islam, political movement, muslim world, liberal democracy, violence
  • Russian Revolutions Of 1917 - 1,114 words
    Russian Revolutions of 1917 Russian Revolutions of 1917 The abdication of Emperor Nicholas II in March 1917, in conjunction with the establishment of a provisional government based on Western principles of constitutional liberalism, and the seizure of power by the Bolsheviks in November, are the political focal points of the Russian Revolutions of 1917. The events of that momentous year must also be viewed more broadly, however: as an explosion of social tensions associated with rapid industrialization; as a crisis of political modernization, in terms of the strains placed on traditional institutions by the demands of Westernization and of World War I; and as a social upheaval in the broades ...
    Related: russian, russian revolution, social order, economic policy, peasant
  • The Shocking Fall Of Communism In Eastern And Central Europe In - 1,731 words
    The shocking fall of communism in Eastern and Central Europe in the late eighties was remarkable for both its rapidity and its scope. The specifics of communism's demise varied among nations, but similarities in both the causes and the effects of these revolutions were quite similar. As well, all of the nations involved shared the common goals of implementing democratic systems of government and moving to market economies. In each of these nations, the communist regimes in power were forced to transfer that power to radically different institutions than they were accustomed to. Democracy had been spreading throughout the world for the preceding two decades, but with a very important differen ...
    Related: central europe, communism, eastern, eastern europe, eastern european, shocking
  • Wwii Rise Of The Superpowers - 1,968 words
    ... ould be definite spheres of influence, as long as it was clear that the Soviet Union was not to interfere with the governments of the affected nations. The reason that Roosevelt did not object to a large portion of Eastern Europe coming under the totalitarian control of the Soviet Union was that he believed the weakness in the Soviet economy caused by the war would require Stalin to seek Western aid, and open the Russians to Western influence. Many historians feel that Roosevelt was simply naive to believe that the Soviet Union would act in such a way. Arthur Schlesinger saw the geopolitical and ideological differences between the United States and the Soviet Union. He stressed however, ...
    Related: wwii, military-industrial complex, cold war, central europe, communism
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