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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: liberal

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  • Allan Bloom Clearly Distinguishes Between Prestigious Private Liberal Arts Colleges And State Universities In The Liberal Stu - 454 words
    Allan Bloom clearly distinguishes between Prestigious Private Liberal Arts Colleges and State Universities in the Liberal Studies selection of his book, The Closing of the American Mind. He strongly believes that the University has to stand for something. There is not a clear definition of what an educated human being is, and it is the responsibility of a University to decide what subjects are going to be required by their students to obtain a degree. Allan Bloom characterizes the prestigious institutions as colleges that are supposed to provide liberal education. He classifies the State Schools as colleges that are to prepare specialists to fit the systematic demands of this complex society ...
    Related: allan, allan bloom, arts, bloom, liberal, liberal arts, liberal education
  • An Education In Liberal Arts - 415 words
    An Education in Liberal Arts An Education in Liberal Arts Liberal arts is a universal education that provides a strong foundation of knowledge in many subjects. Liberal arts can observe the capabilities as well as the limitations of each field of study. This allows students to find connections between different fields of study, to explore them, and to discover new theories and/or inventions. Liberal arts also allows students to investigate areas of interest and to make new ones by combining diverse subjects. A liberal arts education provides students with a broad spectrum of information enabling them to expand their knowledge and to advance society in a positive direction. It is imperative t ...
    Related: arts, arts education, liberal, liberal arts, alexander graham bell
  • I See Myself As A Quite Liberal Person On Political, Social, And Economic Issues I Believe The Public Has Some Duties To The - 560 words
    I see myself as a quite liberal person on political, social, and economic issues. I believe the public has some duties to the government such as pay taxes. In turn, the government should fund programs to help the people who need assistance. Unfortunately, much of the American public has lost its trust in the federal government because of corruption and special interest groups. However, now we are solving many of these problems, and hopefully America will again trust Washington. Once the public puts its trust with its government without criticizing each step of the way, we will see improvements in areas such as education and health care. Through federal mandates, each person will be given the ...
    Related: american public, liberal, political issues, social issues, melting pot
  • Liberal Party Of Canada - 738 words
    Liberal Party Of Canada A liberal, by definition is a person who favours reform, especially in government, economics, and religion, and who prefers democratic or republican forms of government in a constitutional state. This definition generally outlines the definition of the Liberal Party of Canada but as we will see the Liberals are often difficult to define because they occupy the centre of the political spectrum. Part of the reason for the Liberals past success is based on their ability to keep both French and English Canada relatively happy. I. History The Liberal Party was formed around the year 1867. This name was given to the party from the reform groups of Canada East and Canada Wes ...
    Related: canada, english canada, liberal, liberal party, political spectrum
  • Liberal Perspective On Britains Trade Policies - 1,521 words
    Liberal Perspective On BritainS Trade Policies Ideologies can play a significant role when it comes to politics. Once politicians strongly believe in something, it is hard for them to realize that their conducts might be destructive. Political ideologies committed Great Britain to free trade in the late nineteenth century. During seventeenth and eighteenth century, Great Britain pursued protectionism. However, in the first half of nineteenth century, as a result of its establishment as industrial hegemon in Europe, Britain began to adopt free trade policies (Protectonism, Britannica). Liberal economists emphasize the importance of the free market and call for only a limited government role i ...
    Related: free trade, great britain, liberal, world trade, economic environment
  • Liberal Perspective On Britains Trade Policies - 1,464 words
    ... ce was capable to compete in a free market. Nevertheless, he was concerned about protectionist policies of foreign governments. He believed that they imposed unfair obstacles for British trade (Halstead 17). However, John V. Nye expressed opposing view on this issue in his article. He argued that the notion of Britain being the only European country engaging in free trade while the rest of states maintain protectionist policies is wrong. For his argument Nye uses trade policy of France. He claims that according to analysis of British and French trade statistics, average tariff levels in France were below of those in Britain throughout the nineteenth century. That means that French commer ...
    Related: britain france, free trade, great britain, international trade, liberal, trade barriers, trade liberalization
  • Liberal Vs Marxist Feminism - 2,042 words
    Liberal Vs. Marxist Feminism SECTION ONE: Liberal vs. Marxist Feminism Liberal feminists believe that oppression and inequality must be justified. In other words, any inequality between genders must be explained and justified, in order for it to be accepted by the liberal feminists. According to our textbook, the liberal feminism originated from the social contract theories. Such theories state that all forms of social domination or authority must be justified, according to the textbook. Liberal feminists hold a view that every member of the society should be equal. They also insist that the violent forms of oppression should be controlled throughout the society, for they find domestic viole ...
    Related: feminism, liberal, marxist, corporate executive, different aspects
  • Liberal Vs Marxist Feminism - 2,075 words
    ... r state that keeping mommy home is not an excuse, for many women are forced to take lower paid jobs with much heavier physical load in order to provide for their children. In the past, it was very clearly defined that office was man's job and home was women's place. Industrial revolution and technological changes forced men to use women out in the workplace. I don't think that a traditional woman of the past would make such transition. Instead, wars, diseases, poverty, labor shortages, and other influences made it necessary for many women to work. I think that our society still considers that woman's place is in her home. Why? I may think so, because women, who make up over one half o th ...
    Related: feminism, liberal, marxist, angela davis, power over
  • The Fall Of The Liberal Consensus - 1,243 words
    The Fall Of The Liberal Consensus The Fall of the Liberal Consensus Looking at the United States in 1965, it would seem that the future of the liberal consensus was well entrenched. The anti-war movement was in full swing, civil rights were moving forward, and Johnson's Great Society was working to alleviate the plight of the poor in America. Yet, by 1968 the liberal consensus had fallen apart, which led to the triumph of conservatism with the election of President Reagan in 1980. The question must be posed, how in the course of 15 years did liberal consensus fall apart and conservatism rise to the forefront? What were the decisive factors that caused the fracturing of what seemed to be such ...
    Related: consensus, fall apart, liberal, united states economy, president johnson
  • The Fall Of The Liberal Consensus - 1,218 words
    ... ca in reaction to the rise of fragmented civil rights groups such as the Black Panthers when he writes, as for white America, perhaps it can stop crying out against black supremacy,' black nationalism,' racism in reverse,' and begin facing reality. While we now have an understanding of how the fragmentation of the liberal consensus occurred, we still need to look at how this fragmentation gave rise to the conservatism, culminating in the election of Reagan in 1980. In order to do this we must look at how the events of the 1970's give shape and understanding to the turn from the liberal consensus to conservatism. To do this it is important to look at three specific issues that arose durin ...
    Related: consensus, liberal, unemployment rate, economic growth, conservatism
  • The Sun Also Rises The Remarkable Thing About The Book Was Its Liberal Use Of Dialogue And How Hemingway Used It To Carry The - 381 words
    The Sun Also Rises The remarkable thing about the book was its liberal use of dialogue and how Hemingway used it to carry the reader through the book. There was no plot in the book in the sense that there was no twists, intrigue, or goals for any of the characters and the dialogue was the only thing that moved the reader through the book. Hemingway used so much dialogue that it was difficult at times to follow who was saying what, but I believe this didn't matter because any of the characters, except for maybe Jake, could have been carrying on those conversations. I say anyone except Jake because he was different than all the other characters in more ways than just being the narrator. He obv ...
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  • To What Extent Did The Liberal Government 1906 To 1914 Set Up A Welfare State In Britain - 1,115 words
    To What Extent Did The Liberal Government (1906 To 1914) Set Up A Welfare State In Britain? To what extent did the Liberal Government (1906 to 1914) set up a welfare state in Britain? A welfare state is a state with social services controlled or financed by the Government. These services aim to protect society's weakest members from the cradle to the grave; from birth to death. As Beveridge described it, a welfare state is the provision of services for the prevention of "disease, squalor, want, idleness and ignorance." As the national Government from 1906 to 1914, the Liberals passed several reforms which many, including the historian G. Williams, claim heralded the arrival of the welfare st ...
    Related: britain, liberal, national government, state education, welfare, welfare state
  • Buckley Jr - 2,624 words
    ... alleviate the symptoms of glaucoma; to improve appetite dangerously reduced from AIDS. They use it as an effective medicine, yet they are technically regarded as criminals, and every year many are jailed. Although more than 75 per cent of Americans believe that marijuana should be available legally for medical purposes, the Federal Government refuses to legalize access or even to sponsor research. 2. Drugs are here to stay. The time has come to abandon the concept of a "drug-free society." We need to focus on learning to live with drugs in such a way that they do the least possible harm. So far as I can ascertain, the societies that have proved most successful in minimizing drug-related ...
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  • 100 Years Of Solitude - 917 words
    100 Years Of Solitude 100 Years of Solitude Just as Edmund Spenser believes in the ever-whirling wheel of Change; that which all mortal things doth sway, so too does Gabriel Garca Mrquez. In One Hundred Years of Solitude, Colonel Aureliano Buenda experiences life and the changes which accompany it. Spenser views human life as a constant change from one stage to another. The change may be either good or bad; but one thing is certain, change is inevitable. Colonel Buenda is a dynamic character who transforms from an idealistic leader into an increasingly cynical and corrupt man. Toward the end of his life, he isolates himself from the rest of the world. In the beginning of Aurelianos career, h ...
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  • 65279the Establishment In The 1960s - 1,012 words
    The Establishment in the 1960's The nineteen sixties were times of great change. Many people went from moderates to radicals because of the environment around them. That environment was called the establishment. It included all of the events going on in the nineteen sixties. Some of the main events taking place were the Vietnam War, the government, the Democratic National Convention and the culture (*). Many protested things that they did not believe in or thought was wrong (*). There were many things that made the radical's different from the moderates. They were the music they listened to and the clothes they wore. Most obviously was the way they acted. In the summer of 1967, society and r ...
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  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Current Look At Japans Financial And Political Risk - 985 words
    ... me of the worlds most powerful banks, also Japanese. The term "Mof-tan" combines the ministrys acronym with part of the Japanese word "tanto", meaning "person in charge". If the banks of Japan were able to persuade the "person in charge" they then would have the ability to change the rules of the game in which they play, and without a doubt these adjustments would work in their favor. This type of scandalous action would not only create an unleveled playing field but eliminated the Japanese method of monitoring and obtaining information about the validity and integrity of Japanese banking policies. The only answer to the problem would be to eliminate the Mof-tan and create a new way to g ...
    Related: financial sector, political risk, democratic party, japanese economy, resign
  • A Study Of The Book Of Mark - 1,441 words
    A Study of the BOOK of MARK annon An Essay for Humanities Courses That Treat The Bible As A Historical Document MARK'S THEOLOGY REFLECTED IN WRITING Mark and the other evangelists used basically five ways to change, edit or enhance Jesus' sayings to reflect their own views of Christianity. According to the Five Gospels Book, plagiarism and changing of writing was not a crime, but actually very common Mark's time. Besides, Mark never knew Jesus first-hand, he somehow had to make a 'story' from basically Hearsay! Mark groups different parables and sayings of Jesus by topic; making a false impression that these things happened in order. This may have little effect on changing the meaning of the ...
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  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,108 words
    ... s people in the criminal justice system. The Liberal Party reached an agreement with all states and territories to develop critical plans, in association with indigenous people, for the coordination of funding and service delivery aimed at reducing indigenous over-representation in the criminal justice system. This shows that the Liberal government is addressing the problem of Aboriginal deaths in custody, and giving weight to the issue in regards to their policies. While governments did in fact begin to respond to some of the affects of forcible removal during the 1980s, it was during the Labor governments reign that the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody handed down its ...
    Related: aborigines, common law, political issues, royal commission, liberal
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