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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: leo tolstoy

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  • Anna Karenina By Leo Tolstoy 1828 1910 - 1,757 words
    Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910) Type of Work: Tragic love story Setting Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia; nineteenth century Principal Characters Robert Jordan, an American fighting with Spanish Loyalists Anna Karenina, a beautiful young woman Alexey, her cold, vindictive husband Count Vronsky, a young military officer who falls in love with Anna Stepan Oblonsky, Anna's spendthrift brother Dolly, Stepan's frustrated wife Kitty, Dolly's sister Levin, Stepan's rusticc friend, and Kitty's suitor Story Overveiw Stepan Oblonsky's wife Dolly had discovered that her husband was having an affair. With her beauty fading and her household a wreck, ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, tolstoy
  • How Much Land Does A Man Need By Leo Tolstoy - 988 words
    "How Much Land Does A Man Need?" by Leo Tolstoy The Greed of Americans During Westward Expansion The story, "How Much Land Does a Man Need?", by Leo Tolstoy is a story about Americans taking advantage of the Indians. Although it is set in Russia, it is about the greed that many people had at the time and the outcome of that greed. The opening scene represents the Europeans coming over to America. During that time, the mid-1800s, the Europeans were rich and their relatives in America were poor. The younger sister in the story represents the Americans and the older sister represents the Europeans. The poor Americans, like the younger sister in the story, did not mind having to work hard all th ...
    Related: leo tolstoy, tolstoy, english speaking, east coast, english-speaking
  • How Much Land Does A Man Need By Leo Tolstoy The Greed Of Americans During Westward Expansion The Story, How Much Land Does A - 988 words
    "How Much Land Does A Man Need?" by Leo Tolstoy The Greed of Americans During Westward Expansion The story, How Much Land Does a Man Need?, by Leo Tolstoy is a story about Americans taking advantage of the Indians. Although it is set in Russia, it is about the greed that many people had at the time and the outcome of that greed. The opening scene represents the Europeans coming over to America. During that time, the mid-1800s, the Europeans were rich and their relatives in America were poor. The younger sister in the story represents the Americans and the older sister represents the Europeans. The poor Americans, like the younger sister in the story, did not mind having to work hard all the ...
    Related: american people, expansion, greed, leo tolstoy, native americans, tolstoy, westward
  • War And Peace By Leo Tolstoy - 1,119 words
    War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy Then novel War and Peace was written by a famous Russian author Leo Tolstoy in 1865. The novel describes the war with Napoleon in which many countries were involved such as Russia, Austrian, Prussia, Spain, Sweden, and Britain. The novel mainly focuses on Russia. It reflects the different views and participation in the war of Russian aristocracy and peasants and also shows Tolstoys negative viewpoint on the war. Showing the war, Tolstoy describes Napoleons attack on Russia, the battle of Borodino, the slow retrieval of the Russian army, the conquest of Moscow by Napoleon, the fire in Moscow, and the retrieval of Napoleons army during a deadly winter. Naopleon had ...
    Related: leo tolstoy, tolstoy, war and peace, russian army, french army
  • Anna Karanina - 786 words
    Anna Karanina L.E.A.P. Journal for Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy A. Section covered: Part 1 and 2 (pages 17-245) B. Summary: This story first starts out with chaos in the Oblonsky's household. Prince Stephen Oblonsky's wife Dolly found out that he was having an affair with their children's French governess and threatened to move out of the house and take the kids with her. Stephen Oblonsky does not feel bad for having an affair. What he feels bad for is getting caught by his wife. Even though he is upset he is happy to hear the news that his sister, Anna Karenina, is coming to town though. Later in the section Anna convinces Dolly to stay with her husband and not move out. It did not take muc ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, personal reaction, family problems, glad
  • Anna Karenina - 1,352 words
    Anna Karenina Leo Tolstoy's novel, Anna Karenina, upon its release received a mix critical reception, with Russian critics either condemning or applauding the novel primarily on its views of Russian society. Thematically, the novel parallels its heroine's, Anna Karenina, moral and social conflicts with Constantin Levin's internal struggle to find the meaning of life. There are many others underlying themes which links the novel as a whole, yet many critics at the time only looked upon its critical view of Russian life. Henry James called Tolstoy's novels as "loose and baggy monsters' of stylessness, but Tolstoy stated of Anna Karenina ".....I am very proud of its architecture--its vaults are ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, leo tolstoy, true essence
  • Anna Karenina - 764 words
    Anna Karenina This story first starts out with chaos in the Oblonskys household. Prince Stephen Oblonsky's wife Dolly found out that he was having an affair with their childrens French governess and threatened to move out of the house and take the kids with her. Stephen Oblonsky does not feel bad for having an affair. What he feels bad for is getting caught by his wife. Even though he is upset he is happy to hear the news that his sister, Anna Karenina, is coming to town though. Later in the section Anna convinces Dolly to stay with her husband and not move out. It did not take much to convince her because her threats were empty. Oblonsky is the head of a distinguished Government Board in Mo ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, social behavior, family problems
  • Assessment Of Into The Wild - 841 words
    Assessment Of Into The Wild Although precisely on target in his assessment of Chris McCandless being in touch with the bare-bones essence of nature, Gordon Young's preceding description of Chris should be rephrased: A profoundly Un-American figure, uncompromising in his approach and thoroughly optimistic about the future. For Chris McCandless did not set out to show or prove his American character. Neither does he approve or want to exemplify a true modern American character, because true American character does not seek solitude, preferring the saddle to the streetcar, or the star-sprinkled sky to a roof, or, especially, the obscure and difficult trail, leading into the unknown, to any pave ...
    Related: assessment, modern american, different ways, huck finn, charity
  • Comparison Of Peter The Great And Louis The 14th - 1,017 words
    Comparison Of Peter The Great And Louis The 14Th Video Paper # 1 In this paper I will be comparing the rule of Peter the Great and Louis the XIV. I will also be telling you about the similarities and differences between the videos on the Sun King and Peter I. Information on the leaders Homes St. Petersburg and Versailles will also be included in this essay. For the first paragraph I would like to start off by talking about Chateau de Versailles. Versailles took over 50 years to build, which took hundreds of workers lives. The original residence, built from 1631 to 1634, was primarily a hunting lodge and private retreat for Louis XIII. Not the least important element at Versailles was the lan ...
    Related: comparison, king louis, king louis xiv, louis, louis xiv, peter, peter the great
  • Death Of Ivan Ilych By Tolstoy - 676 words
    Death of Ivan Ilych By Tolstoy Leo Tolstoy, born in Russia in 1828, wrote The Death of Ivan Ilych. The story was written eight years after Tolstoys spiritual conversion and was inspired by his own brothers death. The Death of Ivan Ilych has several ironies expressed in the story. Ilych expressed his denial, anger, depression and acceptance towards dying very visibly. Ilych expressed denial of his condition when he laughed about his accident. Ilych was explaining to the upholsterer how he wanted the drapes to hand and he slipped off the ladder. He hit his side against the knob of the window frame. He told his wife it was only a bruise. Since he was fairly athletic, he said he did not get seri ...
    Related: death of ivan ilych, ilych, ivan, ivan ilych, leo tolstoy, tolstoy
  • Gandhi - 1,537 words
    Gandhi Gandhi Gandhi, lived from 1869-1948 and was also known as Mahatma Gandhi, was born in Porbandar, in the modern state of Gujarat, on October 2, 1869, into a Hindu family, Both his father and grandfather having been prime ministers of two adjacent and tiny states. After a modest career at school, he went to London in 1888 to train as a lawyer, leaving behind his young wife, whom he had married when she was in her teens. In London, Gandhi encountered theosophists, vegetarians, and others who were disenchanted not only with industrialism, but with the legacy of Enlightenment thought. They themselves represented the fringe elements of English society. Gandhi was powerfully attracted to the ...
    Related: gandhi, mahatma gandhi, rabindranath tagore, british india, species
  • Gandhi Teachings - 1,287 words
    Gandhi Teachings From Gandhi, to Gandhiji, to Mahatma and Bapu, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi has traveled the distance from being the national hero to a legend. Gandhi, in life, was much more. Gandhi was a thinker, a philosopher, and also a statesman. He believed he could lead only if he was a worthy leader. To be a worthy leader he had to be morally strong. As he used to say, "A liar could not teach his pupils to speak the truth, a coward can not train young men to be brave." So to be morally strong, he believed one has to be strong in spirit. To be strong in spirit, one must live in accordance with one's beliefs, by a strict code of conduct. With such an all-encompassing vision of life, ever ...
    Related: gandhi, karamchand gandhi, mahatma gandhi, mohandas karamchand gandhi, south african
  • Moral And Philosophical History Of Vegetarianism - 1,994 words
    Moral And Philosophical History Of Vegetarianism Vegetarianism is the theory or practice of living solely on vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts. It is practiced for moral, ascetic or nutritional reasons In Western society today meat in many different forms is readily and economically available, yet the current trend shows a growing number of voluntary vegetarians around the world. In the United States, roughly 3 to 4 percent of the total populations are considered vegetarian. The origins of modern day Vegetarian philosophy and its influences can be traced back nearly three thousand years. . Most vegetarians are people who have understood that to contribute towards a more peaceful society we ...
    Related: history, moral issue, philosophical, vegetarianism, greek philosopher
  • Shakespeare Also Spelled Shakspere, Byname Bard Of Avon, Or Swan Of Avon - 600 words
    Shakespeare also spelled SHAKSPERE, byname BARD OF AVON, or SWAN OF AVON English poet, dramatist, and actor, often called the English national poet and considered by many to be the greatest dramatist of all time. Shakespeare occupies a position unique in world literature. Other poets, such as Homer and Dante, and novelists, such as Leo Tolstoy and Charles Dickens, have transcended national barriers; but no writer's living reputation can compare with that of Shakespeare, whose plays, written in the late 16th and early 17th centuries for a small repertory theatre, are now performed and read more often and in more countries than ever before. The prophecy of his great contemporary, the poet and ...
    Related: avon, shakespeare, swan, comedy of errors, john henry
  • Snows Of Kilimanjaro And Death Of Ivan Illych - 1,448 words
    Snows Of Kilimanjaro And Death Of Ivan Illych The Snows of Kilimanjaro" by Ernest Hemingway and "The Death of Ivan Ilych" by Leo Tolstoy are both excellent literary works that both deserve equal praise. Hemingway's story is about a regretful, wasted author named Harry who is lying on an African plain dying of gangrene. Ivan, the main character in Tolstoy's story, is dying of a incurable illness and reminiscing of his life and grieving over everything he did not do right. Both stories have equally effective points of view told in third person narrative. "The Death of Ivan Ilych" has more realistic conflicts than does "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" which has extremely powerful symbols. Both Heming ...
    Related: death of ivan ilych, ivan, ivan ilych, kilimanjaro, snows of kilimanjaro, the snows of kilimanjaro
  • Soviet Downfall - 2,177 words
    Soviet Downfall Abstract This essay concentrates on two representatives of the dissident movement in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and in the 1970s--Andrei Sakharov and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The essay introduces the history of the dissident movement in the Russian Empire under the Tsars and in the Soviet Union under various leaders, mainly under Nikita Khruschev, Leonid Brezhnev and Michael Gorbachev. It presents the historical conflict of Slavophils and Westernizers that began in the time of Peter the Great and discusses its impact on Russian thinkers over the years. The essay proposes that Solzhenitsyn and Sakharov are representatives of two branches of Russian philosophy, modified with ...
    Related: downfall, soviet, soviet bloc, soviet government, soviet union
  • The Death Of Ivan Illych - 1,267 words
    The Death Of Ivan Illych The short story, The Death of Ivan Ilych, written by Leo Tolstoy, is about the reactions of a man and his friends to his suffering and death. Everyone who knows Ivan including Ivan himself has led a life of total disconcern for the feelings and sufferings of others. They all lead shallow lives not daring to probe into the feelings deep down inside for fear of stepping outside the lines of propriety. That is the biggest rule that people of that society follow. Do not say or show what you are thinking. Ivan Ilych's attitude toward life is the same all the way up to his death. He was as the author put it, ...a capable, good-natured, and social man, though strict in the ...
    Related: death of ivan ilych, ivan, ivan ilych, good time, health problems
  • The Ending Of Anna Karenina - 598 words
    The Ending Of Anna Karenina The ending of Anna Karenina As we saw at the end of the novel Anna Karenina, Anna ends her tragic life by throwing herself onto the tracks underneath an oncoming train, while begging God for forgiveness during that time. The way Anna's life ended symbolized the rise and fall of her life put together into one incident that took place on the subway. Anna, who at one point was a very prominent woman in the Russian Society, now lived a sad and dreadful life of misery. By reading at the end, it became very obvious that Anna had by far reached her lowest point in life. Her social problems with Vronsky, Karenin, as well as her other surroundings leave her old and alone. ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, upper class, vice versa
  • War And Peace - 1,255 words
    War And Peace War and Peace The famous Russian author Leo Tolstoy wrote War and Peace in 1865. It is a story about the lives of the Russian royal family from 1805 to 1815. This book depicts things and events that happened during the war. The novel describes the war with Napoleon in which many countries were involved such as Russia, Austrian, Prussia, Spain, Sweden, and Britain. However, the novel mainly focuses on Russia. It reflects the different views and participation in the war of Russian aristocracy. Showing the war, Tolstoy describes Napoleon's attack on Russia, the battle of Borodino, the slow retrieval of the Russian army, the conquest of Moscow by Napoleon, the fire in Moscow, and t ...
    Related: war and peace, french army, french culture, royal family, bigger
  • With Malice Toward None By Stephen Boates - 1,244 words
    ... Lincoln had become the sixteenth President of the United States with 1,866,452 popular votes. However he, did not receive a single vote in ten Southern states, and largely because of his victory, frustrated, humiliated, and defeated Southerners began the process of secession, beginning with South Carolina in 1860. Abraham Lincoln was chosen by destiny as the man to lead the Nation through its most trying hour, and it is quite probable that he understood just how trying it would be. Upon recalling how he felt immediately after learning of his victory, Lincoln replied, "I went home, but not to get much sleep, for I then felt as I never had before, the responsibility that was upon me." (p 2 ...
    Related: malice, stephen, president johnson, abraham lincoln, ralph
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