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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: arctic

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  • Arctic Power A Case Analysis - 1,286 words
    Arctic Power - A Case Analysis ARCTIC POWER - A CASE ANALYSIS CURRENT SITUATION It is the summer of 1987. Arctic Power laundry detergent has contracted with the consulting firm of Smith and Jones, LTD to assist Arctic Power in determining their strategic direction and their product positioning. BACKGROUND AND HISTORY Arctic Power, a laundry detergent specially formulated to clean in cold water, is part of Colgate-Palmolive Canada family of products. Colgate-Palmolive Canada is a wholly owned subsidiary of the multinational corporation Colgate Palmolive. In 1986 Colgate-Palmolive had worldwide sales of $4.9 billion with profits of $178 million, with Colgate-Palmolive Canada having sales of $2 ...
    Related: arctic, case analysis, external analysis, current situation, senior management
  • Arctic Power A Case Analysis - 1,364 words
    ... .6 3.5 3.3 3.2 Removing tough stains 3.0 3.1 2.8 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.7 Being a good value for the price 3.1 3.1 3.3 3.1 2.8 3.0 2.4 Cleaning well in cold water 2.4 2.3 2.6 2.5 2.4 2.3 1.9 Competitive Analysis CPC's competitors consist of two large consumer packaged goods companies: Procter and Gamble--with annual sales exceeding $1 billion, and Lever Detergents--with annual sales in excess of $400 million. Both are subsidiaries of multi-national firms. Each firm has talented and experience marketers, but they compete in a low-growth market where increased sales could be achieved only by taking market share from competitive brands. While Tide and Arctic Power are equivalent brands in terms of c ...
    Related: arctic, case analysis, competitive analysis, environmental analysis, industry analysis, internal analysis
  • Arctic Power Canada - 1,542 words
    Arctic Power Canada Colgate-Palmolive Canada Arctic Power Detergent Introduction The Canadian laundry detergent market is mature, very competitive and dominated by three major consumer packaged goods companies, one of which is Colgate-Palmolive Canada (CPC). Arctic Power is CPC's top-of-the-line offering in its laundry detergent line. Arctic Power is specially formulated for washing in cold water. The detergent has risen in market share from 4% in 1981 to 6.5% in 1986, and the Senior Product Manager has established a goal of reaching 12% market share by 1996. Problem Definition Linda Barton and Gary Parsons face two problems. First, they must determine whether to continue developing the bran ...
    Related: arctic, canada, eastern canada, contribution margin, advertising campaign
  • The Arctic Circle - 1,126 words
    The Arctic Circle Ditions enclose roughly the same territory, which is somewhat larger than the region bounded by the Arctic Circle, and will be used as the basis for this article.The largest Arctic tundra areas are in Canada, Russia, Greenland (Kalatdlit-Nunat), Scandinavia, Iceland and Alaska.Climate and Land Formation Tundra climate is characterized by harsh winters, low average temperatures, little snow or rainfall, and a short summer season (Goudie 1993). The arctic tundra, in particular, is influenced by permafrost, a layer of permanently frozen subsoil in the ground. The surface soil, which tends to be rocky, thaws in summer to varying depths. The combination of frozen ground and flat ...
    Related: arctic, arctic circle, arctic national, arctic national wildlife refuge, circle
  • A Global War Or An Intercontinental Nuclear Exchange Is Highly Unlikely In The Current World Political Climate But As Long As - 1,605 words
    A global war or an intercontinental nuclear exchange is highly unlikely in the current world political climate. But as long as considerable nuclear weapons and long range delivery systems exist in other countries and a developing threat resides with potential adversaries, the possibility of an aerospace attack on North America cannot be discounted. Furthermore, the proliferation of cruise and ballistic missiles, and weapons of mass destruction, has made the post-Cold War world more, rather than less, dangerous. New generations of these weapons may be in the hands of governments or organizations which could threaten the North American continent, or American and Canadian military personnel dep ...
    Related: climate, intercontinental, nuclear, nuclear weapons, political climate
  • Acid Rain - 1,731 words
    Acid Rain Introduction: What Causes Acid Rain? One of the main causes of acid rain is sulfur dioxide. Natural sources, which emit this gas, are Volcanoes, sea spray, rotting vegetation and plankton. However, the burning of fossil fuels, such as Coal and oil, are largely to be blamed for approximately half of the emissions of this gas in the world. When sulfur dioxide reaches the atmosphere, it oxidizes to first form a sulfate ion. It then Becomes sulfuric acid as it joins with hydrogen atoms in the air and falls back down to earth. Oxidation occurs the most in clouds and especially in heavily polluted air where other compounds such as ammonia and ozone help to catalyze the reaction, changing ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, case study, ohio river
  • Adventurism In Human Nature - 843 words
    Adventurism In Human Nature Human history is littered with example where a few individual risked life and limbs to venture into the unknown, which then came to be discovered, thanks to their spirit of adventurism or as some would say, fool hardy bravado. Of course, certain names come to mind, Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, Lois and Clark etc. There is another side to this tale of fame as well. Even the success stories sometimes had a ring of failure about itself. A person might be a pioneer in the field of discovery but the fruits of his labor are enjoyed by those who follow him. He might in fact have served as an expendable instrument in the road to discovery, in the big schemes ...
    Related: human history, human nature, human spirit, to build a fire, captain james cook
  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,519 words
    ALASKAN AVIATION ALASKAN AVIATION Have you ever looked real close at the maps of Alaska? The next time you see a map look for the little airplane symbol in every little town and village in Alaska. That symbol indicates an airstrip. That symbol also means that that is were some unfortunate bush pilot crashed and said, "This looks like a good place for an airstrip." In the early days of Alaskan aviation it was not possible to call ahead and determine if a community had a suitable landing strip. The pilot simply flew to the village and looked for a open spot to land. A controlled crash into deep snow usually resulted. Once aviation became routine, the landing strips were refined and smoothed, b ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, aviation industry, military aviation, arctic circle
  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,481 words
    ... made a timed distance run with a stopwatch and compass, and dropped bombs on an unseen target. This became known as dead reckoning bombing or "DR" runs. Eareckson also began using time-delayed fuses on his bombs that prevented the bombs from exploding under the low flying aircraft that had just dropped its ordnance (Garfield 106). His experiences in Alaska were to contribute significantly to the air war in the Pacific. Having flown in the worst weather imaginable, Col. Eareckson was more than capable of handling a few enemy fighters. Another unique aspect of the war in Alaska was the Lend -Lease program. The Lend- Lease program was established to send supplies and equipment to the embat ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, international airport, ozone layer, elmer
  • Asia - 1,713 words
    Asia Asia Asia, largest of the earth's seven continents. With outlying islands, it covers an estimated 44,936,000 sq km (17,350,000 sq mi), or about one-third of the world's total land area. Asia has more than 3.2 billion inhabitants. Its peoples account for three-fifths of the world's population. Lying almost entirely in the northern hemisphere, Asia is bounded by the Arctic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. The conventional boundary between Europe and Asia is drawn at the Ural Mountains in Russia. Asia and Africa are separated by the Red Sea. Asia is divided for convenience into five major realms: the areas of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); East Asia, including China, Mo ...
    Related: asia, central asia, east asia, eastern asia, south asia, southeast asia, southwest asia
  • Bears - 360 words
    Bears Bears occupy a diversity of habitats, but human encroachment has squeezed them primarily into mountain, forest, and arctic wildernesses. The animals occur on all continents except Africa, Antarctica, and Australia. (Crowther's bear of North Africa's Atlas Mountains is believed to be extinct.) The Arctic coast areas of northern countries are the home of the polar bear, the only marine bear. It is also known as the ice bear in some languages because of its preference for sea ice for hunting; the bottoms of its paws are furred for traction. Brown bears have been successful in the plains and forests of the North Temperate Zone. Their range is dangerously reduced in the lower United States, ...
    Related: bears, black bear, polar bear, sri lanka, north africa
  • Big Oil And Bus Ethics - 1,775 words
    Big Oil And Bus Ethics Big Oil in the Arctic It can be argued (convincingly) that human's usage of fossil fuels is responsible for a large part of the world's pollution problems. The area that I will discuss is the interaction that the big oil companies have had with the environment surrounding their businesses in Alaska. I will not tackle the issue of whether it is right or wrong to extract or use fossil fuels. Instead, I will ignore the larger issue and concentrate on specific issues concerning the Arctic Slope activities of oil companies in Alaska. Because the North Slope oil fields are on American soil, the regulation of the industrial activities is far more stringent than other areas in ...
    Related: ethics, specific issues, legal rights, natural environment, hunt
  • Big Oil And Bus Ethics - 1,640 words
    ... al erosion, and if they blame oil companies then they don't show it. Regardless of the Natives' opinions, their rights are still being violated. The workers at the Alang ship-wrecking yards were happy for the work they had and the meager wages they were being paid, but a slew of their rights were being violated. A group of people, such as the Arctic slope natives can be in favor of activities and still have their rights (unspoiled environment) violated. Wildlife The right of habitat for the wildlife in the Arctic has been infringed upon to a degree by the oil companies. The problem with this argument is that the oil companies can offer proof that the wildlife in the area hasn't really su ...
    Related: ethics, ethical business, california press, economic development, alaska
  • Bioethics - 2,327 words
    Bioethics As our technology continues to advance, new breakthroughs in medicine are discovered. With these new developments serious ethical and moral questions arise. Advancements in genetic engineering, reproductive technologies, cloning, organ transplanting, and human experimentation are all causes of concern. The Human Genome Project, an incredible scientific undertaking determined to produce a map of the human DNA code, will tell us how each gene or group of genes function (Lemonick and Thompson 44). With this map, scientists and doctors will be able to figure out how genes can malfunction and cause deadly diseases. Of course, they will also know what each gene controls, and how to manip ...
    Related: heart disease, cosmetic surgery, genetic engineering, genetically, engineer
  • Blitzkrieg - 1,453 words
    Blitzkrieg The First Phase: Dominance of the Axis Man for man, the German and Polish forces were an even match. Hitler committed about 1.5 million troops, and the Polish commander, Marshal Edward Smigy-Rydz, expected to muster 1.8 million. That was not the whole picture, however. The Germans had six panzer (armored) and four motorized divisions; the Poles had one armored and one motorized brigade and a few tank battalions. The Germans' 1600 aircraft were mostly of the latest types. Half of the Poles' 935 planes were obsolete. Result of German Blitzkrieg on Poland On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. The Polish army expected the attack to come along the Polish frontiers. But ...
    Related: blitzkrieg, polish army, denmark norway, north africa, history
  • Call Of The Wild - 1,175 words
    Call Of The Wild The main character of the novel, The Call of the Wild, is a St. Bernard and Scotch Shepherd mix, named Buck. As I read the book, I found out that Buck can be very loyal and trustworthy to his master, if his master is loyal to him. Also, at times I found that Buck could turn into an enraged beast very easily. At home, which was a large house called Judge Miller's Place, in the sun kissed Santa Clara Valley in California, Buck ruled over all of the dogs that were there. Buck was Judge Miller's inseparable companion, until a man named Manuel, who was one the gardener's helpers, committed a treacherous act. In order to cover his Chinese lottery gambling debts, he stole Buck from ...
    Related: call of the wild, the call of the wild, santa clara, management skills, bloody
  • Canada Did You Ever Stop And Wonder How Much We Take The Place We Live For Granted If You Were To Take The Time, You Would Di - 708 words
    CANADA Did you ever stop and wonder how much we take the place we live for granted? If you were to take the time, you would discover how diverse are Canada's history, geography, climate, economy, cultures and government. Did you know it is the largest country in the world now that U.S.S.R broke up. Specifically, Canada is 9,922,330 square km. Did you know that Canada used to be named "Kanata"? Yes, Kanata is an Indian word meaning village. It was not until July 1,1867 that Kanata was renamed Canada. Canada was originally discovered by Jacques Cartier an explorer from France who sailed down the St.Lawrence in 1534. Cartier we believe was the first to set foot on Canadian soil. He marked his p ...
    Related: canada, eastern canada, french canada, royal canadian, governor general
  • Canadian Fur Trade - 1,435 words
    Canadian Fur Trade The Canadian fur trade, which grew out of the fishing industry, began as a small business, but would expand and become not only the exploiter of a primary Canadian resource, but the industry around which the country of Canada itself developed. The fur trade started shortly after the discovery of the Grand Banks off the coast of Newfoundland. The fishermen who fished there were the first people who traded furs with the Indians; this trade was a secondary means of profit for the fishermen. Later this secondary industry became a profitable big business due to changes in European fashion, and fashion techniques. While the fur trade brought economic growth and land discoveries, ...
    Related: canadian, fur trade, adverse effects, america after, stroke
  • Chlorofluorocarbons Cfcs - 701 words
    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) CFCs are a family of man-made gases used for various industrial purposes. First developed in the 1920's in the United States, CFCs have been used in large quantaties since 1950. The industrialized countries can account for over 80% of CFCs use. CFC-11 is used primarily as a propellant in aerosol cans, although its use has been phased out it is still used in the production of plastic foams. CFC-12 is used in foam production as well as cooling coals of refrigerators and air conditioners. HCFC-22 was recently introduced as a replacement for CFC-12 because of its shorter life in the atmosphere, and thus is less of an ozone depleting drug. CFC-113, methyl chloroform, an ...
    Related: cfcs, greenhouse gases, montreal protocol, aerosol cans, industrialized
  • Cold Water Discovered In The Subtropical Atlantic Was Brought There By A Current Which Had Originated In The Polar Region Tem - 638 words
    Cold water discovered in the subtropical Atlantic was brought there by a current which had originated in the polar region; temperature measurements in the real ocean and computer models show there is a southward outflow of cold deep water from the Arctic throughout the Atlantic. This cold water is replaced by warm surface waters, which gradually give off their heat to the atmosphere as they flow northward towards Europe. This acts as a massive heating system for all the land downwind. The heat released by this system is enormous: it measures around 1015 W, equivalent to the output of a million large power stations. If we compare places in Europe with locations at similar latitudes on the Nor ...
    Related: atlantic, north atlantic, originated, polar, polar region
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