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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: learning disability

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  • Adhd: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments For Illness - 1,232 words
    Adhd: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments For Illness ADHD: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments for Illness A child named Alva comes to mind. Alva's teacher taught by rote, which was too mechanical for the boy's creative mind. His thoughts often wandered, while his body seemed in perpetual motion in his seat. The teacher found Alva, inattentive and unruly and often threatened punishment. Alva, fearful and out of place, ran away from school (Robbins 2). The preceding quote is an example of a student that lived many years ago that would most likely be diagnosed today with ADHD. There is an increasing debate on the subject of using prescription drugs to treat the condition of Attent ...
    Related: illness, medical news, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, high blood pressure, medicalization
  • Attention Deficit Disorder - 1,480 words
    Attention Deficit Disorder Attention Deficit Disorder Five year old Danny is in kindergarten. It is playtime and he hops from chair to chair, swinging his arms and legs restlessly, and then begins to fiddle with the light switches, turning the lights on and off again to everyone's annoyance--all the while talking nonstop. When his teacher encourages him to join a group of other children busy in the playroom, Danny interrupts a game that was already in progress and takes over, causing the other children to complain of his bossiness and drift away to other activities. Even when Danny has the toys to himself, he fidgets aimlessly with them and seems unable to entertain himself quietly. To many, ...
    Related: attention deficit, attention deficit disorder, compulsive disorder, conduct disorder, defiant disorder, deficit, deficit disorder
  • Cerebral Palsy - 908 words
    Cerebral Palsy Katherine Dillon Child Psychology Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a term used to describe disorders of movement that result from injury to the brain. It is a problem of muscle coordination. The muscles themselves are not effected but the brain is unable to send the appropriate signals necessary to instruct the muscles when to contract or relax. Cerebral Palsy can be caused by numerous problems occurring in the prenatal period, prematurity, labor and delivery complication in the newborn period due to genetic or chromosomal abnormality to the brain may not develop in the typical way. Some environmental factors such as drugs metabolic problems, and placental dysfunction may also lead to C ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, palsy, technical support, resource center
  • Colorado - 1,477 words
    Colorado Colorado: Then and Now Hard to get and heavy to hold. (Coel 1) Headlines in 1858 when gold was found along the Platte River. Which started a booming economy in mining. Some struck it rich and some moved on. Some did farming and ranching, while others started a new business and some saw the money in tourism. In time some of these people have continued to become successful and others have found wealth. But what has really happened to the businesses of Colorado as a whole? Mining, farming and ranching, and tourism were important parts of Colorado around 1900 at the turn of the century, but many wonder if at the start of a new century is it the same. As many people look back at the begi ...
    Related: colorado, drinking water, hot springs, tourist attractions, highlands
  • Dyslexia - 1,572 words
    Dyslexia Whether we graduate from highschool or college we all hope to find a challenging career that will propel us forward in today`s society. For those suffering from dyslexia this only adds to the frustration and fears associated with seeking employment. Many adults with dyslexia or other forms of learning disabilities never disclose their disability in interviews or once employed for fear of being discriminated against. Several investigators have noted, however, that many persons with learning disabilities adjust well to the demands and complexities of adulthood. (Greenbaum et al. 1996). The basic cause of dyslexia is still not known, however, much research is being done to determine th ...
    Related: dyslexia, information processing, real estate, mechanical engineer, mechanical
  • Dyslexia - 1,542 words
    ... nts is considered to have some type of learning disabilities. Due to the passage of the Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 schools are now becoming involved in assisting disadvantaged students. Congress passed the 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation Act, which focused on providing equal education for any and all students with learning disabilities. This law mandates that students with learning disabilities receive supplemental services while attending educational settings (Barga, 1996). Today, the number of students in higher educational settings who have experienced some type of learning disability has increased from .3 percent in 1983 to 1.2 percent in 1987 (Heath, 1992). This same survey ...
    Related: dyslexia, state university, written communication, learning disability, director
  • Esl And Reading Theories Midterm - 1,574 words
    Esl And Reading Theories Midterm Mid-Term/Spring 1998 This Termpaper was for an Educational Class for the Teaching Credential Program. The questions listed below describe various theories and questions related to ESL and reading. Hope you find this paper useful. I got an 'A' for this termpaper Bibliography : Author - Ruddell Reading in Secondary Education 1. Krashen's theory of comprehensible input states: We learn a second language containing linguistic structures that are just beyond the structures we already know. (Ruddell, Page 341). According to Krashen, Comprehensible input is symbolized by the following formulated statement: i (input + 1). This means that comprehensible input is just ...
    Related: midterm, reading comprehension, paying attention, language development, native
  • Exceptional Education Referral To Placement - 1,056 words
    Exceptional Education Referral To Placement Abstract This paper will reflect upon the school-wide dilemma of students, families and schools involved in the referral and placement process of students with special needs such as specific learning disabilities and beyond. This is a genuine problem in our Florida school system as each year is seems to take longer for a student who has been referred by an educator to be placed into a situation which best meets their academic and/or emotional needs. This paper will concentrate on stories derived from primary stakeholders dealing with this situation. The stakeholders for this particular story are; Diana, a 3rd grade student in need, and her family, ...
    Related: exceptional, placement, referral, grade level, regular classroom
  • Exceptional Education Referral To Placement - 1,013 words
    ... gardless of a child's needs. The county psychologists, who have on average 4-7 schools a piece, have been told they must reduce the number of students tested county-wide by 10%, rather than allowing for the possibility that some schools may have a larger exceptional needs population of students. Exceptional Education Teacher Another important stakeholder in this cycle of referrals to placement is the ESE (exceptional student education) teacher. The ESE teacher at Diana's school has held this position for ten years in three different states and is also a parent herself of a child diagnosed with a learning disability. After speaking with Mrs.V, I learned much valuable information. Accordin ...
    Related: exceptional, placement, referral, publishing group, school psychologist
  • Flowers For Algernon - 606 words
    Flowers For Algernon When was the last time you wanted something so much, you would sacrifice your life to have it; even if just for a moment? Charlie Gordon, a 37 year old man with a learning disability, did just that. In the story "Flowers for Algernon", by Daniel Keyes, Charlie gets a chance to alter his I.Q. substantially through operation. The only drawback to this is, the long-term outcomes of the operation are unknown. The operation does succeed, but later Charlie is sent on a riveting downward spiral into the life he tried to run away from. The operation hurt Charlie in every imaginable way; and did nothing to help him. Is it not better to do your best than to be the best? Charlie Go ...
    Related: algernon, flowers for algernon, last time, higher level, happier
  • Injuries In Sports - 1,280 words
    Injuries In Sports Despite the high prevalence and potentially serious outcomes associated with concussion in athletes, there is little systematic research examining risk factors and short- and long-term outcomes. Objectives To assess the relationship between concussion history and learning disability (LD) and the association of these variables with neuropsychological performance and to evaluate postconcussion recovery in a sample of college football players. Design, Setting, and Participants A total of 393 athletes from 4 university football programs across the United States received preseason baseline evaluations between May 1997 and February 1999. Subjects who had subsequent football-rela ...
    Related: sports, sports medicine, american college, learning disability, cumulative
  • Learning Disabilties - 804 words
    Learning Disabilties Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Learning Disabilties "I'm just starting my sophomore year in college.... I first knew I had a learning disability when I was in first grade. A learning disability is like any other disability, but in this case it's the learning process that is disturbed. There is something that's stopping me from learning in the average way. I know it's not that I can't learn. I can, but I learn differently and it's often much harder for me.... This in turn means that I have difficulty with reading and spelling, and also with remembering what I hear" (Wren 3). Like Cory, almost 20% of children, of the total school population, su ...
    Related: learning disability, learning process, early childhood, social problems, foot
  • Motor Training - 2,108 words
    ... h, and Bryant Crate. Marianne Frosting has a test based system (Gearheart, 1973). The classroom teacher may administer her test in groups. She has five subtests which measure various skills which she states "are necessary to success in academics". She has a series of training exercises in both gross and fine motor skills. Her test is limited to visual-perceptual skills, and the program is basically a visual-perception program. Musk Moisten (Hellmuth, 1968) involves a theoretical framework in which a child can be led in an orderly manner from situations in which he simply responds to commands, to situations in which he actively engages in problem solving and can see for himself the qualit ...
    Related: motor, motor development, motor skills, training program, saint louis
  • Motor Training - 296 words
    Motor Training Motor training to develop readiness, motivation and means of expression, as a basis for learning programs Motor activity is fast becoming a valuable aid in the teaching of academic subjects to elementary school children. The realization of the place motor activity has in the classroom does not imply that physical activity is a prerequisite to learning but rather a method through which a child can learn more easily and understand more fully. Training in physical coordination is not only helpful in providing a child with a mode for expressing what has been learned, but it has become a factor in instilling in the child a willingness and readiness to learn and has also introduced ...
    Related: motor, motor development, school children, elementary school, expressing
  • Psychology: Use Of Language - 1,225 words
    Psychology: Use Of Language Jennifer Mull Psychology Human speech makes possible the expression and communication of thoughts, needs, and emotions through vocalization in the form of words. It is a process whose specialized adaptations differentiate it from the mere making of sounds--a capacity humans share with most animals. In addition to the capacity for laryngeal production of sound (which some animals also possess), speech requires a resonance system for modulation and amplification of that sound and an articulation process for the shaping of that sound into the communally established word-symbols of meaning that constitute the language of a given culture. (Dean Edell) The use of langua ...
    Related: cerebral palsy, hearing loss, mental retardation, parental, dystrophy
  • Short Stories - 2,456 words
    ... little bit. She thought of her crazy idea to cut off her hair for money. Once she got her haircut off and had the money, she was so happy to buy Jim a present. They exchanged presents only to find that Jim bought her a brush set and she bought him a chain for the watch he sold for her brushes. Once again, she cried because they gave up their lovely possessions for each other and had nothing to do with their new presents. Stephen Crane, "The Open Boat" "The Open Boat" is a dramatic short story based on Stephen Crane's own real-life experience. In this short story, Crane provided biographical facts and also added a lot of description. In the story there are a lot of psychological meanings ...
    Related: short story, willa cather, american society, learning disability, willa
  • The History Of Special Education In The Twentith Century - 1,304 words
    ... f All Handicapped Students Act (EHA). This act authorized state grants to help give all handicapped children a free and appropriate education, and also tried to combat the misclassification and exclusion of school age children between the ages of six and eighteen. As EHA was being executed, and schools became more and more accessible and appropriate for those students with disabilities, Congress was willing to include more children under EHA's protection. In 1983 and 1986, Congress amended the law to provide early childhood special education for children ages three to five. It was also believed that children with disabilities could also use assistance in the transition from childhood to ...
    Related: appropriate education, department of education, education classes, education plan, education program, education programs, general education
  • Verbal Threats Of Suicide - 517 words
    Verbal Threats Of Suicide verbal threats of suicide. So how can the physician determine when a patient should be diagnosed as depressed or suicidal? Brown (1996) suggested the best way to diagnose is to screen out the vulnerable groups of children and adolescents for the risk factors of suicide and then refer them for treatment. Some of these risk factors include verbal signs of suicide within the last three months, prior attempts at suicide, indication of severe mood problems, or excessive alcohol and substance abuse. Many physicians tend to think of depression as an illness of adulthood. In fact, Brown (1996) stated that it was only in the 1980's that mood disorders in children were includ ...
    Related: suicide, verbal, young people, adolescent depression, episode
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