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  • Analytical View Of James Joyces Araby - 1,085 words
    Analytical View Of James Joyces' Araby # Goldstein ## Sara Goldstein Ernst Narrative Fiction 22 October 2000 An Analytical View of Araby Viewpoints from which stories are written are used to enhance the overall point a story is making. James Joyces Araby is no exception. Narrated by a young boy of about twelve or thirteen, it depicts his personal coming of age. The usage of a first person narration allows the reader to see things the way the boy sees them; be as innocent and wistful as he is, thus feeling the incredible intensity of his eventual realization. In addition to this coming of age theme, intricately woven throughout are hints to Joyces contemptuous view of Roman Catholicism, as we ...
    Related: analytical, araby, james joyce, the narrator, roman catholic
  • Araby - 1,143 words
    Araby "Araby" Lesson in Adolescence In his brief but complex story Araby, James Joyce concentrates on character rather than on plot to reveal the ironies within self-deception. On one level Araby is a story of initiation, of a boy's quest for the ideal. The quest ends in failure but results in an inner awareness and a first step into manhood. On another level the story consists of a grown man's remembered experience, for a man who looks back to a particular moment of intense meaning and insight tells the story in retrospect. As such, the boy's experience is not restricted to youth's encounter with first love. Rather, it is a portrayal of a continuing problem all through life: the incompatibi ...
    Related: araby, first love, the girl, james joyce, vitality
  • Araby - 1,644 words
    Araby And Sunrise On Veld Awareness "Araby" by James Joyce and "A Sunrise On The Veld" by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and dissimilar aspects of both characters and various components of the short stories. In the two stories, both characters were experiencing an initiation or awareness of new actualities that were outside of themselves. The main chara ...
    Related: araby, james joyce, the narrator, first person, eager
  • Araby By James Joyce - 400 words
    Araby By James Joyce Love at a young age is just an obsession. As children, our first relationships are object relationships. The people we like aren't people; they are objects of our obsession, and our obsessions are driven by vanity and narcissism. We are obsessed with what we consider an ideal, something we create. The main character in the short story "Araby" by James Joyce is a young boy that looks at every event in his life through narcissistic eyes. He thinks he is in love with a girl, but in reality, he is obsessed by his thoughts and his ideal. In the story, the boy lives in a home that once belonged to a priest that passed away. While looking around the house, the protagonist notic ...
    Related: araby, james joyce, joyce, walter scott, young boy
  • Araby By James Joyce - 1,434 words
    Araby By James Joyce The short story, "Araby", by James Joyce is about a lonely boy who makes a pilgrimage to an eastern-styled bazaar in hopes that it will alleviate his miserable life. Throughout the story he battles withdrawal and a lack of control. Moreover, the themes of alienation and control are inherently linked because the source of the boy's emotional distance is his lack of control over his life. The story begins as the boy describes his neighborhood. Immediately a feeling of alienation and bleakness prevails. The street that the boy lives on is a dead-end; he is literally trapped. Furthermore, he feels ignored by the houses on his street. Their "brown imperturbable faces make him ...
    Related: araby, james joyce, joyce, short story, young boy
  • Araby By James Joyce And A Sunrise On The Veld By Doris Lessing - 1,648 words
    Araby by James Joyce and A Sunrise On The Veld by Doris Lessing Araby" by James Joyce and "A Sunrise On The Veld" by Doris Lessing are both short stories in which the protagonists gained a consciousness that was beyond themselves. The main characters are both initiated into new realities and truths of which they were not previously aware. Both short stories will be examined with reflections according to the type of initiation that was experienced, the nature of the narrators, the similar and dissimilar aspects of both characters and various components of the short stories. In the two stories, both characters were experiencing an initiation or awareness of new actualities that were outside of ...
    Related: araby, doris, doris lessing, james joyce, joyce, lessing, sunrise
  • Araby Vanity - 552 words
    Araby- Vanity The characters in Araby display a wide spectrum of vanity that encompasses a variety of people. The narrator of the story is the best example of vanity. He is obsessed with a girl that lives next door to him. He never remarks about her personality but does remark that her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance. A mind that is only intrigued by images is the pinnacle of vanity. Another example of this vanity in the narrator is noted within other statements about the girl. The narrator remarks that her name sprang to my lips at moments in strange prayers. Her image and vision was now controlling his prayers and the girl is the only God that he now acknowl ...
    Related: araby, vanity, the girl, james joyce, selfishness
  • Araby, James Joyce - 741 words
    Araby, James Joyce Comment on the narrative voice of the story. Why does the boy get disillusioned at the end of the story? Does the confrontation with the reality take place only at the end? At what moment in the story and in what details does he confront the actual? The narrative voice of Araby by James Joyce is the author taking on the role of a male whose name is never mentioned. From the description of the setting we learn that he lives with his aunt and uncle in a working class area of Dublin. In the beginning of the story we are led to believe that he is a boy, playing in the streets with his friends as children do The career of our play brought us through the dark muddy lanes . (Joyc ...
    Related: james joyce, joyce, mangan's sister, the girl, approaches
  • John Updikes A P And James Joyces Araby - 1,326 words
    JOHN UPDIKE'S A & P AND JAMES JOYCE'S ARABY John Updike's A & P and James Joyce's Araby share many of the same literary traits. The primary focus of the two stories revolves around a young man who is compelled to decipher the different between cruel reality and the fantasies of romance that play in his head. That the man does, indeed, discover the difference is what sets him off into emotional collapse. One of the main similarities between the two stories is the fact that the main character, who is also the protagonist, has built up incredible,yet unrealistic, expectations of women, having focused upon one in particular towards which he places all his unrequited affection. The expectation th ...
    Related: araby, james joyce, john updike, young boy, the girl
  • Definition Of Hope - 845 words
    Definition Of Hope The dictionary definition of hope is 'a desire accompanied by expectation of or belief in fulfillment.' The meaning of despair according to the dictionary is 'the utter loss of hope.' So we can see how these two terms are related. In Kundera's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being," the first time we see Tomas go through both of these emotions is when he dealing with the issue of his son. After his divorce he has some hope that he will remain a part of his son's life with scheduled visits. However, when his ex repeatedly cancels these visits he loses all this hope and is in a state of despair and then decides that he will no longer see or speak to his son again. For the longe ...
    Related: mother tongue, young boy, james joyce, prague, vacation
  • Dubliners - 1,192 words
    Dubliners Literature is constantly showing its readers aspects of people and societies that would not normally be shown to the public. The various aspects of society that writers choose to focus on are done for a reason. Whether or not it is a positive or negative aspect of society doesn't hold any significance. The only thing that matters in society is why writers choose to focus on the subjects that they do. Most writers are trying to push their readers further by challenging them with an aspect that the reader may overlook in everyday situations. In his Dubliners, James Joyce uses the function of religion in society to show how corruption has overtaken the Irish. Joyce portrays the immora ...
    Related: dubliners, men and women, deadly sins, catholic church, holy
  • Dubliners By James Joyce - 1,073 words
    Dubliners By James Joyce Joyce said that in "Dubliners" his intention was "to write a chapter in the moral history of my country and I chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to me the centre of paralysis".The 15 stories which make up the collection are studies on the decay and banality of lower middle-class urban life and the paralysis to which Joyce refers is both intellectual and moral.The characters who appear in the stories lead uneventual and frustrated lives,which are described through carefully chosen detaila.The fact that there is very little action points again to the paralysis and monotony of life in a modern city.The stories are divided into 4 groups.As Joyce explained ...
    Related: dubliners, james joyce, joyce, urban life, public life
  • Dubliners By James Joyce - 1,080 words
    ... ire of it has a much more complicated meaning.Eastward movement theme finds its roots in the catholicism; the ancient custom of building churches with their heads to the east so that the celebrant of the mass faced east: in doing so the priest looked toward Eden,the earthly paradise; the cathecumens 4th century turned to the west to renounce Satan and to the east to recite the creed before they stepped into the baptismal font; Chist returning for the Last Judgment was expected to come from east; East: universally accepted emblem of beginning and place of birth. So, that "unity of Dubliners" which critics talk about , is realized in terms of religious images and ideas(most of them distinc ...
    Related: dubliners, james joyce, joyce, last judgment, mangan's sister
  • Main Street By Sinclair Lewis - 456 words
    Main Street by Sinclair Lewis Annonymous For as long as I can remember, I've loved to read: short stories, fiction, nonfiction sometimes, even philosophy if nothing else were available. This term I've been given more reading assignments than I can ever remember having to deal with. This term has been extra special because we studied no less than three types of literature: short stories, poetry, and drama. While I was in high school, a short story was a book with less than three hundred pages. This term I learned that even though a short story may be only a few pages long, there are chapters of interpretation, ambiguity, and symbolism to understand. In 'The Lottery' by Shirley Jackson, I foun ...
    Related: lewis, main street, sinclair, sinclair lewis, dylan thomas
  • Religion As A Captor - 1,514 words
    Religion As A Captor A collection of short stories published in 1907, Dubliners, by James Joyce, revolves around the everyday lives of ordinary citizens in Dublin, Ireland (Freidrich 166). According to Joyce himself, his intention was to "write a chapter of the moral history of [his] country and [he] chose Dublin for the scene because the city seemed to [b]e the centre of paralysis" (Friedrich 166). True to his goal, each of the fifteen stories are tales of disappointment, darkness, captivity, frustration, and flaw. The book is divided into four sections: childhood, adolescence, maturity, and public life (Levin 159). The structure of the book shows that gradually, citizens become trapped in ...
    Related: religion, middle class, an encounter, literary criticism, romance
  • Short Stories - 2,456 words
    ... little bit. She thought of her crazy idea to cut off her hair for money. Once she got her haircut off and had the money, she was so happy to buy Jim a present. They exchanged presents only to find that Jim bought her a brush set and she bought him a chain for the watch he sold for her brushes. Once again, she cried because they gave up their lovely possessions for each other and had nothing to do with their new presents. Stephen Crane, "The Open Boat" "The Open Boat" is a dramatic short story based on Stephen Crane's own real-life experience. In this short story, Crane provided biographical facts and also added a lot of description. In the story there are a lot of psychological meanings ...
    Related: short story, willa cather, american society, learning disability, willa
  • Winter Dreams - 482 words
    Winter Dreams Final Paper Question #1 A. In the opening of the story, James Joyce carefully described the protagonists neighborhood and surroundings in two paragraphs. As he used real names like North Richmond Street and Christian brothers School, thus by reading the first paragraph, readers are able to figure out a map of the community in which the protagonist lived. Then he went on to lead us to the late priests drawing room. The detailed description of the room appealed to our senses. Following the footsteps of the protagonist, the readers can smell the musty air of the room, see the littered kitchen, touch the curl and damp books found in the kitchen. This realistic description enables t ...
    Related: dreams, winter, winter dreams, the lottery, detailed description
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