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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: kidney failure

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  • California, Gurse Books, 1983 - 1,203 words
    California, Gurse Books, 1983 The book I read was about the hard difficult task of overcoming this terrible eating disorder known as Bulimia. It is a secret addiction that dominates thoughts, severely undercuts self esteem, and threatens lives. Bulimia is a food obsession characterized by repeated overeating binges followed by purges of forced vomiting, prolonged fasting, and/or abusive laxatives, enemas and diuretics. A typical binge/purge cycle, who and why people become involved with bulimia, and the medical complications of bulimia, are all amazing factors that we should be able to recognize this deadly disease by, enabling us to suggest treatment. What is a typical binge? "Typical" depe ...
    Related: time passes, eating disorder, social isolation, disorder, exercise
  • Cloning Technology - 1,787 words
    Cloning Technology Technology is changing the world as we know it. Not all of these advances in technology are viewed as positive. One of the breakthroughs that has received mixed responses is the issue of cloning. There has been much debate on this topic, and the debate is certain to rage on for many years to come. You may be asking yourself: What is cloning? How can I benefit from cloning? Is cloning legal? Why should we clone human beings? What is the world community doing to control cloning? I hope to answer these and other questions throughout the course of this paper. What is cloning? According to the Human Cloning Foundation (HCF1998), cloning is a scientific process in which a strand ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, technology, heart attack, tay sachs disease
  • Creatine In Ncaa Baseball - 1,344 words
    ... of the NCAA players who take it do understand that the long-term effects have not been determined. They know that some players have had bad experiences. They are certainly aware that Creatine decreases fatique and can build muscle mass. However, they do not know what they are getting in each bottle. The FDA (Food and Drug Administration) found many bottles of Creatine with different ingredient levels. Doctor Kuehl, Director Human Performance at OHSU Department of Medicine, says that calcium and calorie levels were sometimes different then what the bottle read. What does this do to the athlete? Dr. Kuehl says they have not yet found what kind of impact this could have on athletes. We don ...
    Related: baseball, baseball players, creatine, ncaa, kidney failure
  • Diabetes - 3,161 words
    Diabetes Diabetes Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, is a chronic illness this means that it has no cure and the symptoms persist over a long period of time. This illness is a result of an imbalance of hormones, insulin, produced in the pancreas. Insulin plays an important role in how the body uses food. Insulin enables the cells in the bloodstream to absorb and use glucose for fuel. If the pancreas produces too little or no insulin or if the insulin doesnt work properly the person may become diabetic. Therefore, diabetics are not able to properly convert food into fuels needed by the body to function, which can seriously lead to physical consequences. The pancreas, located behind the stomach, is ...
    Related: american diabetes, dependent diabetes, diabetes, diabetes association, diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetes - 692 words
    Diabetes Diabetes is a very serious disease that attacks millions of people around the world. It can strike at any age and can happen to anyone. Although we are not exactly sure about the causes of diabetes, we believe that it has to do with the body's own immune system attacking and destroying insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Without insulin, the glucose that we need to live, has a hard time entering the cells of the body that need it. If too much glucose builds up in the blood, then a diabetic may begin to have headaches or blurry vision. They may become very thirsty and have dry, itchy skin. If glucose levels go too low, then a diabetic may feel shaky, tired, hungry, confused, or ...
    Related: dependent diabetes, diabetes, diabetes type, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes
  • Euthanasia - 2,327 words
    Euthanasia The Right to Choose The main issues of euthanasia are maintaining the status of illegality, legalizing the procedure, and regulating the procedure. The controversy of euthanasia involves moral, ethical, and legal concerns. In this country, according to a survey reported in the Journal of American Medical Association, nearly 63 percent of Americans favor legalizing physician-assisted suicide, yet most state statutes criminalize it (Stark, np). People fear that if legalized, the choice to die will eventually be taken out of their hands and placed in the hands of people who will choose to kill select people based on their own private criteria. Maybe this is true, but it is doubtful. ...
    Related: euthanasia, voluntary euthanasia, insurance industry, fourteenth amendment, illegal
  • Government - 2,325 words
    GOVERNMENT Government can not exactly be described as an industry segment but it has significant effect on the rest of the industry in every segment. Due to this big effect, we agreed that the two major effects of the government come in the form of Medicare and Medicaid. These two programs effect millions of people and eventually the health industry overall. Analyzing these programs that are very complex and intertwined with each other was a complex job. Even though we tried our best to separate them as two different segments, many problems are similar. We believe this information is essential while analyzing the rest of the industry. MEDICARE AND MEDICAID A) MEDICARE HISTORICAL CONTEXT Medi ...
    Related: federal government, cost containment, short term, health maintenance, discretionary
  • Hypertension - 722 words
    Hypertension Hypertension is a common disorder characterized by a sustained elevation of systolic arterial pressure (top number) of 140 mm Hg or higher, or a diastolic arterial pressure (bottom number) of 90 mm Hg or greater, or both. Hypertension is divided into two categories: essential (or primary) hypertension and secondary hypertension. Etiology: Research has shown that hypernatremia (elevated serum sodium) increases the volume of blood, which raises blood pressure. Primary hypertension may also develop from alterations in other bosy chemicals. For some clients who respond to stress at a higher degree, hypertension may be related to a higher degree, hypertension may be related to a high ...
    Related: hypertension, weight loss, high blood pressure, medical history, muscle
  • Isaac Asimov - 1,774 words
    Isaac Asimov Isaac Asimov was born on January 2, 1920 in Petrouchi, Russia. His parents were Judah and Anna Asimov. Isaac also has a sister Veronica and a brother Stanley. In 1923 his family immigrated to the United States. He and his family grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In Brooklyn his family ran a small candy and magazine store. This is one of the places where Asimov began to learn about printing. Also it was here that Asimov learned good business and self-discipline skills (Bloom, 251). Asimov attended school and was a very bright student. He went to college at Columbia University. He graduated from there with his masters degree in Chemistry in 1941. His career was cut short though becau ...
    Related: asimov, isaac, isaac asimov, house publishers, new jersey
  • It Was A Typical August Afternoon For Florida Temperatures Simmered In The Eighties And The Humidity Was So Thick You Could C - 1,152 words
    ... engulfed me. I saw the vision of the smashed vehicle in the center of the road and could only hear my mother's hysterical crying while Claudia and my cousin comforted her. Was it fear? Was it shock, or was it those emotions that deluged me, still yet to come out? Reality settled in for a while when a policeman and Claudia ordered me to drive my mother, Katie and me home because my mother was too emotional to drive. As we departed, Claudia instructed me to pack my mother a bag. I wondered why, but dutifully put my mother in the car as she insisted that I drove as close to the helicopter landing sight as possible so she could see that my grandmother was safely on board. My mother managed t ...
    Related: eighties, florida, thick, kidney failure, care unit
  • Lena Horne - 1,390 words
    Lena Horne Lena Horne Lena Horne was born on June 30, 1917 in Brooklyn, New York. Her parents were Teddy and Edna Scottron Horne. After her father left her at the age of two in order to pursue his gambling career; her mother leaving soon after that to pursue her acting career; she went to live with her grandparents. Through her grandparents influence she became involved with organizations like the NAACP, at an early age. In 1924 she went back to live with her mother, traveling and being schooled all over the state until she was fourteen. At the age of fourteen she decided to drop out of school and go to work. Because she was talented and light skinned it was not hard for her to find a job. S ...
    Related: horne, lena, jazz singer, cosby show, achievement
  • Meaning Of Death - 1,830 words
    Meaning Of Death Death is a word that we know and fear, but what exactly does the word death mean to you? The end of life? The end of time? The end of hope? Wellmaybe. Some see Death as a messenger sent by god to take away people's lives. For some people, death is the worse of the worse thing of all, but for the protagonists in the plays Amadeus and Waiting for Godot death is something that they do not fear. They actually want to die or use death as a tool to achieve a certain goal. Although this might sound odd, there is a solid logic behind it. While death is a significant theme in both plays, the meaning of death between the two plays varies. In the play Waiting for Godot, Estragon and Vl ...
    Related: natural death, more important, waiting for godot, amadeus mozart, despair
  • Mozart - 611 words
    Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria on January 27th, 1756. He was born to Leopold and Anna Maria Pertl. Leopol was a very successful composer, voilinist, and the assistant concertmaster at the Salzburg court. Mozart showed musical talent at a very young age. By age five he was composing minuets.And at age six he played before the Bavarian Elector and the Austrian Empress.His father taught him, but said teahcing Wolfgang was hard because he knew so much already. His father was also his largest influence. In 1763 Wolfgangs father, Leopold, took him and his sister, Maria Anna, on a concert tour of Europe. The children performed in many courts and large cities including ...
    Related: amadeus mozart, mozart, wolfgang amadeus mozart, anna maria, kidney failure
  • Mozart Death - 1,802 words
    Mozart Death For the past two hundred years, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's death has been shrouded in mystery. Some say his great rival, Antonio Salieri, or the Freemasons murdered him. Others say he was simply exhausted. And some believe he died from sickness. It has been established that Mozart suffered from various illnesses, which no doubt contributed to his death. But some researchers have concluded that physical and mental exhaustion greatly affected Mozart, and contributed to his early death. These researchers claim that by cramming more work and play into one year than most people did in ten years, Mozart literally"burned himself out". The constant strain on his body forced it to succumb ...
    Related: amadeus mozart, mozart, wolfgang amadeus mozart, financial crisis, people believe
  • Nursing Care Plan - 4,502 words
    Nursing Care Plan Course: NUR 1210L Instructor: Dates of Care: 12, 13, 19 & 20 Sept 96 Date Submitted: 11/15/96 Student Names: Anthony Bernardi, SN/SPJC HOLISTIC NURSING CARE PLAN STUDENT Anthony Bernardi GRADE DATE November 15, 1996 Client's Clinical Picture (5) (Initial Cephacaudal assessment) Textbook Description of Diagnosis (5) Summary of Client's Progress (5) Completion of Holistic NCP Tool (30) NURSING DIAGNOSIS (15) GOALS (10) INTERVENTIONS (10) RATIONALES (5) EVALUATIONS (10) REFERENCES (5) TABLE OF CONTENTS SUBJECT PAGE # Cover Page 1 Grading Point Scale 2 Table of Contents 3 Summary Page 4 Client's Clinical Picture (Cephacaudal Assessment) 5 Medical Diagnosis 6 Textbook Des ...
    Related: care plan, nursing, nursing care, disease process, pulmonary tuberculosis
  • Sports Supplements - 1,822 words
    Sports Supplements Athletes are competitive. They go out there to win. But, at all costs? Why are athletes willing to sacrifice their long term health in order to have one outstanding season? Will it be worth it when they are hooked up to machines in order to stay alive? Many athletes do not think that taking a supplement will harm them. They are strong, tough athletes, nothing can harm them, right? So, they start taking creatine or andro, or both. For most, they lose body fat, gain strength and muscle. That sounds great, but that is not always what happens. The use of over-the-counter sports supplements is dangerous and the FDA should take them off the shelf. Supplements are supposed to be ...
    Related: dietary supplements, nutritional supplements, professional sports, sports, sports medicine
  • Steroids - 1,201 words
    Steroids Drugs have been used in sports almost as long as sports themselves have been around. The ancient Incas discovered that the ashes from burned leaves of the Coca tree gave the people great stores of energy, and made sleep unnecessary for hours or even days, it was later discovered to be the stimulant cocaine. They would take it before long hunts, battles, and even found it useful in ancient sport competitions. It wasn't until 1886 that the first drug-related death in sports occurred. A bicyclist took a mixture of cocaine and heroine, called the speedball, and died from it. Little were the doctors aware the epidemic that would follow in the next century. Anabolic steroids, developed in ...
    Related: anabolic steroids, steroids, unborn child, kidney failure, chemicals
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - 1,169 words
    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS HOPE IS GROWING Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory disease which may affect many different organs and tissues in the body. Women of child bearing age are typically affected, but individuals of any age, sex, or race may develop the disease. SLE while uncommon, is not rare, with an estimated disease prevalence of 1 in every 2,000 population. It is a condition which appears to be increasing in prominence especially over the last 15 to 20 years. This is likely explained by the earlier recognition of milder cases because of increased patient and physician awareness and by the enhanced availability of sensitive lab ...
    Related: erythematosus, lupus, lupus erythematosus, systemic, systemic lupus erythematosus
  • The Benefits Of Human Cloning - 1,044 words
    The benefits of human cloning There are many ways in which in which human cloning is expected to benefit mankind. Below is a list of ways that it is expected to help people. This list is far from complete. Human cloning technology could be used to reverse heart attacks. Scientists believe that they may be able to treat heart attack victims by cloning their healthy heart cells and injecting them into the areas of the heart that have been damaged. Heart disease is the number one killer in the United States and several other industrialized countries. There has been a breakthrough with human stem cells. Embryonic stem cells can be grown to produce organs or tissues to repair or replace damaged o ...
    Related: cloning, human cells, human cloning, cosmetic surgery, heart attack
  • The Ebola Virus - 1,594 words
    The Ebola Virus A virus is an ultramicroscopic infectious organism that, having no independent metabolic activity, can replicate only within a cell of another host organism. A virus consists of a core of nucleic acid, either RNA or DNA, surrounded by a coating of antigenic protein and sometimes a lipid layer surrounds it as well. The virus provides the genetic code for replication, and the host cell provides the necessary energy and raw materials. There are more than 200 viruses that are know to cause disease in humans. The Ebola virus, which dates back to 1976, has four strains each from a different geographic area, but all give their victims the same painful, often lethal symptoms. The Ebo ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, virus, respiratory system, most dangerous
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