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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: kantian

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  • Active Euthenasia A Kantian Perspective - 1,259 words
    Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective Euthanasia is one of society's more widely, and hotly debated moral issues of our time. More directly, active euthanasia, which by definition, is; "Doing something, such as administering a lethal drug, or using other means that cause a person's death."1 Passive euthanasia, defined as; "Stopping (or not starting) some treatment, which allows a person to die, the person's condition causes his or her death,"2 seems not to be as debated, perhaps not as recognized, as it's counterpart. I have chosen to look more closely at the issue of active euthanasia, ...
    Related: active euthanasia, kantian, concise oxford dictionary, health care, personally
  • Democratic Ecohumanism, Market Civilization - 1,363 words
    ... ntal/ humanistic dichotomy in order to realize the essential interconnectedness of these two arenas, so that when Shiva describes the over fishing of the shrimp beds off of the coast of India, we are reminded that the costs are equally felt in the environment and the dissolution of local fishing cultures. (Shiva, 37-54) Because the priorities of the market, (namely continuous development and wealth generation for the small minority which sits atop the neo-liberal hierarchy), are radically opposed to eco-humanistic ideal which we can assume are basically shared by the resource-poor majority of the world, the neo-liberal system is forced to manufacture consent in a manner that Gill finds e ...
    Related: civilization, market, market economy, money supply, american system
  • Egoism Ethics - 1,866 words
    Egoism Ethics In ethics egoism entails that the individual self is either the motivating moral force and is, or should, be the end of moral action. Egoism divides into both a positive and normative ethic. The positive ethic views egoism as a factual description of human affairs, that is people are motivated by their own interests and desires. The normative ethic is that they should be so motivated. Positivist egoism: Psychological Egoism The positivist egoist, whose theory is called psychological egoism, offers an explanation of human affairs, in effect a description of human nature, which he or she believes to be wholly self-centred and self-motivated. In its strong form the theory asserts ...
    Related: egoism, ethics, more successful, enquiry concerning, logically
  • How Does Descartes Try To Extricate Himself From The Sceptical Doubts That He Has Raised Does He Succeed - 2,342 words
    ... llows: "If a conviction is so firm that that it is impossible for us ever to have any reason for doubting what we are convinced of, then there are no further questions for us to ask; we have everything we could reasonably want." Under my interpretation, this is what it is about the cogito that makes it so important for Descartes, so we cannot have any argument with the principle expressed by him in the above passage. But can it help break the circle? When we clearly and distinctly perceive something, Descartes says, fairly I think, that this perception compels our assent, that we cannot but believe it. God's rle in the system, to these commentators, is as a guarantor of our memory regard ...
    Related: descartes, succeed, make sense, western philosophy, grant
  • Human Values And Ethics Vs Philisophical Ethics - 1,349 words
    Human Values And Ethics Vs. Philisophical Ethics HUMAN VALUES AND ETHICS VS. PHILIOSOPHICAL ETHICS "They had discussed it, but not deeply, whether they wanted the baby she was now carrying. 'I don't know if I want it,' she said, eyes filling with tears. She cried at anything now, and was often nauseous. That pregnant women cried easily and were nauseous seemed banal to her, and she resented banality" (p. 389 Alice Walker The Abortion). It could sound familiar to many of us. Either in personal life or while discussing and debating, whether during college courses or encircled by close friends, I am sure that each and everyone of us has come across with the issue of abortion, developing a disti ...
    Related: ethics, human history, human life, human values, alice walker
  • Human Values And Ethics Vs Philisophical Ethics - 1,353 words
    ... nature and it's laws. He was arguing that everything in nature operates in conformity with certain rules and standards. More specifically, Kantian personal moral law -- "categorical imperative" says the following: "Act as if the maxim [that is the subjective governing principle] of your action were to become through your will a universal law of nature" (p. 31 Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals). Now, could you imagine what it would be like, if abortion had became 'a universal law of nature?' The existence of human species would come to an end. Therefore, I think that deontologists, based on the facts I've just given, would consider abortion in general as an immoral thing to do. Neve ...
    Related: ethics, human values, catholic church, roman catholic, fetus
  • Hume's Views On Kant's Concept Of God - 747 words
    Hume'S Views On Kant'S Concept Of God For Hume, all objects of human reason are divided into two kinds: Relations of Ideas and Matters of fact. All reasoning of matters of fact are founded on Cause and Effect. Cause and Effect play a big role in Hume's philosophy. David Hume is a man of logic, who believes in experience over knowledge. This is the main in idea in his philosophy. Contrary to many critiques Hume does believe that there is a God, however he does not believe that God is all greatness like society commonly assumes and excepts. Hume argues that because one sees an effect that doesn't mean that we can automatically know or assume its cause. This argument can be used to explain the ...
    Related: kant's, cause and effect, self satisfaction, david hume, snow
  • Is Feminism Harmful - 1,921 words
    Is Feminism Harmful? PART B- IS FEMINISM A HARMFUL IDEOLOGY? Describe two central moral issues. In Issue 4, Is Feminism a Harmful Ideology? I believe that the two central moral issues to this debate are as follows : (1) Is it immoral to infringe upon individual liberty (even if some other good can come of it)? (2) Is it immoral to discriminate based on sex (even if there are innate differences, which are relevant to the situation)? What makes these distinctly moral issues, as opposed to legal, religious, or socio-political issues? These are distinctly moral issues for a few reasons. First, answers to these questions require normative statements (yes it is immoral, or no it isn't immoral to i ...
    Related: feminism, harmful, playing field, political issues, procreate
  • Kant And Mill - 1,023 words
    Kant And Mill The task that stands before me in this paper is to address two situations and determine the ethical parameters in which a person should act. The two philosophical approaches that I will examine the situations with the Kantian and Utilitarian point of view. Kant deciphers his ethical questions by examining a persons motivation for performing an act regardless of the consequences. A person who utilizes the Kantian view believes that the only pure good is pure human reason without consequences. This pure human reason works without the influence of human emotions and desires. A truly good act as defined by Kant is performed because of an obligation to the categorical imperative. Th ...
    Related: kant, mill, the girl, ethical decision, sadness
  • Kant And Utilitarianism - 1,360 words
    Kant And Utilitarianism In the story, The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas, two points of view are introduced. The Kantian point of view is contrasted with the Utilitarian point of view. In the story there is a city named Omelas, in which a single child suffers so that the community may live with great happiness. Most of the community accepts the fact that one child must suffer for happiness to exist. However, the odd citizen becomes so disgusted with the fact the child is allowed to suffer that they leave Omelas for good. In this essay, one character will be a Utilitarian and another character will be Kantian. The two characters will debate the issue of sacrificing one person for the good of ...
    Related: kant, utilitarianism, happy life, planet earth, shouldnt
  • Mill And Kants Theories - 1,570 words
    ... an achieve a level of cognition equal to one another, for without that equanimity of cognition and judgement, then the conflict issues cannot be rationalized through creation of universal law. That all people can achieve a similar level of cognition seems preposterous in our modern world cognition in the sense of like thought. Because we need the principles of Kant's categorically designed thought and action to have universal acceptance, we must be willing to accept the undesirable psychological deviants within the "republic." I can think of no person that would (Ted Bundy, Jeffery Dahmer, Zodiac Killer) a universal law. Yet, if we can't accept that Dahmer's cognition is capable of unive ...
    Related: mill, code of ethics, categorical imperative, empirical evidence, entirety
  • Moral Judgement Kant Utilitarian - 659 words
    ) Moral Judgement (Kant / Utilitarian.) ) Moral Judgement (Kant / Utilitarian.) First of all I want to state the Kantian and the Utilitarian views butt heads on this issue. The Kantian view is nonconsequential, that is as a matter of principle with the consequences be damned. The Utilitarian view is consequential with the results given as much consideration as possible. I will attempt to explain what I mean through some examples. Some school systems hand out condoms free of charge to their students. The Utilitarian view would be that this is a good thing. They would state that by doing so they are stopping unwanted pregnancies that in turn could cost society. This program would help stop the ...
    Related: judgement, kant, utilitarian, utilitarian view, good thing
  • Philosophy Kants Universal Law Formation Of The Categorical Imperative - 1,541 words
    Philosophy - Kants Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative Kantian philosophy outlines the Universal Law Formation of the Categorical Imperative as a method for determining morality of actions. This formula is a two part test. First, one creates a maxim and considers whether the maxim could be a universal law for all rational beings. Second, one determines whether rational beings would will it to be a universal law. Once it is clear that the maxim passes both prongs of the test, there are no exceptions. As a paramedic faced with a distraught widow who asks whether her late husband suffered in his accidental death, you must decide which maxim to create and based on the test whic ...
    Related: categorical, categorical imperative, formation, imperative, philosophy
  • Racial Profiling - 1,596 words
    Racial Profiling Racial profiling is the tactic of stopping someone because of the color of his or her skin and a fleeting suspicion that the person is engaging in criminal behavior (Meeks, p. 4-5). This practice can be conducted with routine traffic stops, or can be completely random based on the car that is driven, the number of people in the car and the race of the driver and passengers. The practice of racial profiling may seem more prevalent in today's society, but in reality has been a part of American culture since the days of slavery. According to Tracey Maclin, a professor at the Boston University School of Law, racial profiling is an old concept. The historical roots "can be traced ...
    Related: profiling, racial, racial discrimination, racial profiling, american renaissance
  • Sartres Existentialism - 1,654 words
    Sartre`s Existentialism The word philosophy comes from Greek and literally means "love of wisdom." The Merriam- Webster dictionary defines philosophy as "a critical study of fundamental beliefs and the grounds for them." Because of the diversity of positions associated with existentialism, the term is impossible to define precisely. However, existentialism is a philosophical movement of the 19th and 20th century that centers on the analysis of individual existence and the given situation of the individual who must assume complete responsibility for his acts of free will without any certain knowledge of what is right or wrong or good or bad. Existentialism was started in the late 19th century ...
    Related: existentialism, jean paul sartre, jean-paul sartre, paul sartre, human nature
  • Tim St Amour - 1,240 words
    Tim St. Amour Mrs. McKenny English 10 Honors May 15, 2000 Transcendentalism and Ralph Waldo Emerson So what is Transcendentalism anyway and how have mens thoughts and outlooks been able make it what it is remembered as? I. Ralph Waldo Emerson A. Emersons Life 1. Childhood 2. Adulthood B. Emersons thoughts and views 1. Thoughts on resolutions 2. Views of people 3. Feelings about the universe and soul II. Transcendentalism A. History 1. When it occurred a. what was going on around the time of transcendentalism? b. How did these events affect its development 2. Where it comes from a. where did Emerson get his ideas? b. What cultures influenced the philosophy? B. The movement 1. The transcendent ...
    Related: amour, absolute truth, literary movement, german philosopher, spiritual
  • Unjust People Rectification - 954 words
    Unjust People Rectification Robert Nozick, in his essay Rights and the Entitlement Theory, discusses the rights of individuals and just acquisition. He makes it clear that these rights and/or acquisitions cannot be taken away by anyone, either by an individual or by a collective identity such as the state. Individual people and the state have an obligation to not interfere with ones rights or just acquisitions. As long as one does not interfere with anothers life and intrinsic rights then no one else shall interfere with anothers life, it is a reciprocal obligation. Furthermore, the government should be involved minimally in the life of the individual. According to Nozick, the state should b ...
    Related: unjust, central theme, hypothetical situation, private property, initiation
  • Utilitarianism V Kantianism - 1,287 words
    Utilitarianism V. Kantianism Ethics can be defined as "the conscious reflection on our moral beliefs with the aim of improving, extending or refining those beliefs in some way." (Dodds, Lecture 2) Kantian moral theory and Utilitarianism are two theories that attempt to answer the ethical nature of human beings. This paper will attempt to explain how and why Kantian moral theory and Utilitarianism differ as well as discuss why I believe Kant's theory provides a more plausible account of ethics. Immanuel Kant's deonotological ethical theory assesses if actions are moral based on the person's will or intention of acting. Kant's theory can be categorized as a deonotological because "actions are ...
    Related: utilitarianism, different ways, categorical imperative, right thing, lecture
  • Where Is The Meaning Of Human Existence Located According To Sartre - 863 words
    Where Is The Meaning Of Human Existence Located? According To Sartre Where is the meaning of human existence located? According to Sartre The word philosophy comes from Greek and literally means love of wisdom. Webster dictionary defines philosophy as a critical study of fundamental beliefs and the grounds for them. Both explanations of philosophy are correct and concrete, while where the meaning of human existence is located has no such concrete answer, but in this paper we will examine where Sartre believes it to be. Sartre's existentialism is a philosophy, which deals with man. It states that man is that which he makes of himself and that he has to make his own choices in a state of angui ...
    Related: human existence, human nature, sartre, webster dictionary, working class
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