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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: kant

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  • An Overview Of Immanuel Kant - 1,043 words
    ... tegorical imperative focuses on the principle, rather than the people, involved. Kants theory also avoids utilitarianism, which would permit lying, murder, stealing, and the like, if it produces happiness. His theory is for capital punishment(2). Kant writes: Even if a civil society resolved to dissolve itself with the consent of all its members- as might be supposed in the case of a people inhabiting an island resolving to separate and scatter through the whole world- the last murder lying in prison ought to be executed before the resolution was carried out. This ought to be done in order that every one may realize the desert of his deeds, and that bloodguiltiness may not remain on the ...
    Related: immanuel, immanuel kant, kant, overview, categorical imperative
  • Hume Vs Kant - 1,751 words
    Hume Vs. Kant Hume vs. Kant On the Nature of Morality From the origin of Western philosophical thought, there has been an interest in moral laws. As Hume points out in the Treatise, morality is a subject that interests us above all others (David Hume A Treatise of Human Nature'). Originally, thoughts of how to live were centered on the issue of having the most satisfying life, with virtue governing one's relations to others (J.B. Schneewind 'Modern Moral Philosophy'). However, the view that there is one way to live that is best for everyone and the view that morality is determined by God, came to be questioned, and it is this that led to the emergence of Modern moral philosophy. The moral de ...
    Related: david hume, hume, immanuel kant, kant, categorical imperative
  • Hume Vs Kant - 1,407 words
    Hume Vs Kant Morality Hume vs. Kant David Hume and Immanuel Kant each made a significant break from other theorists in putting forward a morality that doesnt require a higher being or god, for a man to recognize his moral duty. Although Hume and Kant shared some basic principals they differed on their view of morality. In comparing the different views on human will and the maxims established to determine moral worth by David Hume and Immanuel Kant, I find their theories on morality have some merit although limited in view. Hume and Kant shared some basic principle of empiricism, but each took different directions on the theory of morality. The moral theory of Hume was based on his belief tha ...
    Related: david hume, hume, immanuel kant, kant, moral life
  • Hume's Views On Kant's Concept Of God - 747 words
    Hume'S Views On Kant'S Concept Of God For Hume, all objects of human reason are divided into two kinds: Relations of Ideas and Matters of fact. All reasoning of matters of fact are founded on Cause and Effect. Cause and Effect play a big role in Hume's philosophy. David Hume is a man of logic, who believes in experience over knowledge. This is the main in idea in his philosophy. Contrary to many critiques Hume does believe that there is a God, however he does not believe that God is all greatness like society commonly assumes and excepts. Hume argues that because one sees an effect that doesn't mean that we can automatically know or assume its cause. This argument can be used to explain the ...
    Related: kant's, cause and effect, self satisfaction, david hume, snow
  • Immanuel Kant Enlightenment - 1,104 words
    Immanuel Kant - Enlightenment What is enlightenment? Immanuel Kant attempts to clarify the meaning of enlightenment while composing the essay, "What is Enlightenment?". This document was written in response to political and social changes brought about by King Frederick of Prussia. The goal of Kant's essay was to discuss what the nature of enlightenment was. It also taught one how enlightenment can be brought about in the general public. Kant explains that, "enlightenment is man's release from his self-incurred tutelage" (Kant 85). Tutelage is man's incompetence to have direction for oneself. In other words, enlightenment is the progress of a society through the free activity of rational tho ...
    Related: age of enlightenment, enlightenment, immanuel, immanuel kant, kant
  • Immanuel Kant Simply Stated The Creed Of The Enlightenment: Dare To Know, Kant 1 To Thinkers Like Kant, To Achieve Enlightenm - 1,261 words
    Immanuel Kant simply stated the creed of the enlightenment: "Dare to know," (Kant 1). To thinkers like Kant, to achieve enlightenment was to "gain release from...self-incurred tutelage...[the] inability to make use of [ones] understanding without direction from another," (Kant 1). Enlightenment thinkers addressed this issue. They present to us the question; why is it so hard to think for oneself? They propose answers to this puzzle, as well as provide solutions that will teach us how to think for ourselves. Through Immanuel Kants "What is Enlightenment" and J.S. Mills On Liberty, we can gain a deeper understanding of this question, and its answers. According to Kant, "laziness and cowardice" ...
    Related: creed, dare, immanuel, immanuel kant, kant
  • Kant - 1,618 words
    Kant How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled CLOSE TO NONSENSE, but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us explore the schools of rationalism and empiricism and compare his views with that of other rationalists and empiricists (mainly Hume), and see where he ends up on the finish line towards the nature of huma ...
    Related: kant, finish line, innate ideas, primary sources, ideology
  • Kant - 689 words
    Kant Kant starts off making two distinctions regarding kinds of knowledge, empirical/rational and formal/material. Empirical or experience-based knowledge is compared with rational knowledge, which is independent of experience. This distinction between empirical and rational knowledge rests on a difference in sources of evidence used to support the two different kinds of knowledge. Formal is compared with material knowledge. Formal knowledge has no specific subject matter; it is about the general format of thinking about any subject matter whatsoever. Material knowledge is of a specific subject matter, either nature or freedom. Rational knowledge is metaphysics, of which there are two branch ...
    Related: kant, different kinds, moral obligation, moral philosophy, intrinsic
  • Kant And Mill - 1,023 words
    Kant And Mill The task that stands before me in this paper is to address two situations and determine the ethical parameters in which a person should act. The two philosophical approaches that I will examine the situations with the Kantian and Utilitarian point of view. Kant deciphers his ethical questions by examining a persons motivation for performing an act regardless of the consequences. A person who utilizes the Kantian view believes that the only pure good is pure human reason without consequences. This pure human reason works without the influence of human emotions and desires. A truly good act as defined by Kant is performed because of an obligation to the categorical imperative. Th ...
    Related: kant, mill, the girl, ethical decision, sadness
  • Kant And Utilitarianism - 1,360 words
    Kant And Utilitarianism In the story, The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas, two points of view are introduced. The Kantian point of view is contrasted with the Utilitarian point of view. In the story there is a city named Omelas, in which a single child suffers so that the community may live with great happiness. Most of the community accepts the fact that one child must suffer for happiness to exist. However, the odd citizen becomes so disgusted with the fact the child is allowed to suffer that they leave Omelas for good. In this essay, one character will be a Utilitarian and another character will be Kantian. The two characters will debate the issue of sacrificing one person for the good of ...
    Related: kant, utilitarianism, happy life, planet earth, shouldnt
  • Moral Judgement Kant Utilitarian - 659 words
    ) Moral Judgement (Kant / Utilitarian.) ) Moral Judgement (Kant / Utilitarian.) First of all I want to state the Kantian and the Utilitarian views butt heads on this issue. The Kantian view is nonconsequential, that is as a matter of principle with the consequences be damned. The Utilitarian view is consequential with the results given as much consideration as possible. I will attempt to explain what I mean through some examples. Some school systems hand out condoms free of charge to their students. The Utilitarian view would be that this is a good thing. They would state that by doing so they are stopping unwanted pregnancies that in turn could cost society. This program would help stop the ...
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  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • Abortion - 1,429 words
    Abortion In our society, there are many ethical dilemmas that we are faced with that are virtually impossible to solve. One of the most difficult and controversial issues that we are faced with is abortion. There are many strong arguments both for and against the right to have an abortion which are so complicated that it becomes impossible to resolve. The complexity of this issue lies in the different aspects of the argument. The essence of a person, rights, and who is entitled to these rights, are a few of the many aspects which are very difficult to define. There are also issues of what circumstances would justify abortion. Because the issue of abortion is virtually impossible to solve, al ...
    Related: abortion, american society, self defense, birth control, defining
  • Absolutism And Relativism - 1,251 words
    Absolutism And Relativism Absolutism and relativism are two extreme ethical approaches to reality. While they are both valid and supported by facts, they are very contrasting in their views. Values are what a person cares about and thinks is worthwhile. For example, values can include life, love, religious faith, freedom, relationships, health, justice, education, family and many other things. Usually these values are what provides the passion in a person's life, and gives them hope and a reason for being. A person might go to any lengths to protect what they feel is right and to preserve these values. Values can be divided up into two subcategories: absolute and relative. Absolute values de ...
    Related: absolutism, relativism, john stuart mill, more important, fundamental
  • Aesthetics - 921 words
    Aesthetics Kant defined aesthetic as both, "the analysis of taste and the analysis of sensible cognition or intuition" (1). Aesthesis, means "sensation", the Greeks made a distinction between aesthesis autophues (natural sensation) and aesthesis epistemonike (acquired sensation) (1). We may say that aesthetics is both the study of aesthetic objects and of the specific and subjective reactions of observers, readers, or audiences to the work of art. Aesthetics is necessarily interdisciplinary and may be interpretive, prescriptive, descriptive, or a combination of these. The big, obvious question about aesthetic value is whether it is ever 'really in' the objects it is attributed to. This issue ...
    Related: aesthetic experience, bears, realism
  • Anna Karenina - 1,503 words
    Anna Karenina The world of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow's Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and forced into action against their will by coincidence and, sometimes, misfortune. That Anna and Vronsky ever meet and begin the fateful affair that becomes the centerpiece of the novel is itself a consequence of a long chain of unrelated events: culminating Anna's sharing a berth with Vronsky's mother on her way to reconcile Dolly and Stiva in Mosco ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, immanuel kant, book of deuteronomy
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 979 words
    Approaches To Environmental Ethics And KantS Principle 1. All of the three approaches to environmental ethics use Kant's principle to various extents. The differences between them lie in their individual definitions of moral categories. It's like looking at the same slide under three different powers on a microscope. Each approach relies on Kant's principle to protect the interest of that which they deem worthy. Baxter's anthropocentric approach clearly states that our obligations regarding the environment are to be determined solely on the basis of human interests. Our welfare depends on breathable air, drinkable water and edible food. Thus, polluting the environment to the extent that it d ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, intrinsic value
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, philosophical views
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, alan turing
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,508 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as the universe extending to a single thinkin ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, carnegie mellon university
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