Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: kansas nebraska

  • 35 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Kansas Nebraska Act Resolved: The Kansasnebraska Act Was Fair - 369 words
    Kansas & Nebraska Act Resolved: The Kansas-Nebraska Act Was Fair. The Kansas-Nebraska act was a proposal by Sen. Stephen A. Douglas which said that Kansas and Nebraska territory could be allowed to govern for itself whether or not to be a slave state or a free state. By a vote of its residents the territories would become a slave or a free state.This caused many fights between Northerners and Southerners. As a result many people were killed. This act was fair because it gave the majority of the population the choice. This would be better because if the government just said that the land was a free state the people who had slaves would have to move out of their state and travel to a slave sta ...
    Related: kansas, kansas nebraska, nebraska, kansas-nebraska act, free state
  • A Gold Rush Leads To War - 1,304 words
    A Gold Rush Leads to War A Gold Rush Leads to War The American Civil War (1861-1865) and the Reconstruction period that followed were the bloodiest chapters of American history to date. Brother fought brother as the population was split along sectional lines. The issue of slavery divided the nation's people and the political parties that represented them in Washington. The tension which snapped the uneasy truce between north and south began building over slavery and statehood debates in California. In 1848, settlers discovered gold at Sutter's Mill, starting a mass migration. By 1849, California had enough citizens to apply for statehood. However, the debate over whether the large western st ...
    Related: gold rush, rush, senate race, democratic party, invalid
  • Abe Lincoln - 1,112 words
    ... him from the chores Lincoln attended ABC school.10 This is where Lincoln learned to become a hard worker. Lincolns working days started in 1831. Abe and his brother were hired to build a boat and float it down the Mississippi with a load of cargo on it. The boat was headed towards New Orleans and this is where Lincoln saw his first, but not last, slave auction. Lincoln is quoted in saying, if I ever got a chance to hit that thing, I would hit it hard. 11 Lincoln was not in favor of slavery but he was certainly to abolitionist. Lincolns career in politics began in the spring of 1832, when Lincoln was 23, he ran for a seat on the Illinois House of Representatives. In his campaign, Lincoln ...
    Related: abe lincoln, lincoln, interest rate, republican party, auction
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,920 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Kentucky. When he was two, the Lincolns moved a few miles to another farm on the old Cumberland Trail. A year later, his mother gave birth to another boy, Thomas, but he died a few days later. When Lincoln was seven his family moved to Indiana. In 1818, Lincolns mother died from a deadly disease called the "milk-sick." Then ten years later his sister died and left him with only his father and stepmother. Lincoln traveled to New Salem in April 1831 and settled there the following July. In the fall of 1836 he and Mrs. Bennett Abell had a deal that if she brought her single sister to New Salem he had to promise to marry her. When ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, john wilkes booth, president johnson
  • Abraham Lincoln - 1,117 words
    Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln, the 16th president of the United States, guided his country through the most devastating experience in its national history--the Civil War. He is considered by many historians to have been the greatest American president. Early Life Lincoln was born on Feb. 12, 1809, in a log cabin in Hardin (now Larue) County, Ky. Indians had killed his grandfather, Lincoln wrote, "when he was laboring to open a farm in the forest" in 1786; this tragedy left his father, Thomas Lincoln, "a wandering laboring boy" who "grew up, litterally [sic] without education." Thomas, nevertheless, became a skilled carpenter and purchased three farms in Kentucky before the Lincolns left th ...
    Related: abraham, abraham lincoln, lincoln, mary todd lincoln, nancy hanks lincoln, thomas lincoln, todd lincoln
  • American Identity - 1,828 words
    American Identity The American Identity It can strongly be argued, as it has for many years, whether or not an American identity ever occurred between 1776 and 1861. The answer to this question really depends on your definition of what an identity consists of. An identity is the sameness in all that constitutes the objective reality of a thing; oneness. The thirteen colonies tried hard to find a sense of themselves as a nation even before they had a nation. Nationality became an American invention (notes). To find an identity the thirteen colonies created a flag, symbols of nationality (bald eagle, pluribus Unum), and they established national heroes (George Washington). Next they began to s ...
    Related: american, american identity, national identity, huckleberry finn, missouri compromise
  • American Parties From The Civil War - 1,731 words
    American Parties from the Civil War American Parties from the Civil War This essay conains American party systems from the end of George Washingtons first term as president through the Civil War. Included are the creations, the building up of, and sometimes the break down of the various parties. As well as the belief in which the parties stood for. The Origins of the Democratic Party In colonial politics tended to organize and electioneer in opposition to the policies of royal, mercantile, banking, manufacturing, and shipping interests. Agrarian interests later become a principal source of support for the Democratic Party. Many of the colonies had so-called Country parties opposing the Court ...
    Related: american, american party, american political, civil war, native american, political parties
  • Carl Sandburg - 1,717 words
    Carl Sandburg As a child of an immigrant couple, Carl Sandburg was barely American himself, yet the life, which he had lived, has defined key aspects of our great country, and touched the hearts and minds of her people. Sandburg grew up in the American Midwest, yet spent the majority of his life traveling throughout the states. The country, which would define his style of poetry and his views of society, government, and culture, would equally be defined by his writing, lecturing, and the American dream he lived: The dream of becoming successful with only an idea and the will to use it. Historically, Sandburg's most defining poetic element is his free verse style. His open views towards Ameri ...
    Related: carl, carl sandburg, sandburg, puerto rico, american dream
  • Civil War - 880 words
    Civil War Albert Gallatin Brown, U.S. Senator from Mississippi, speaking with regard to the several filibuster expeditions to Central America: I want Cuba . . . I want Tamaulipas, Potosi, and one or two other Mexican States; and I want them all for the same reason -- for the planting and spreading of slavery. [Battle Cry of Freedom, p. 106.] Richmond Enquirer, 1856: Democratic liberty exists solely because we have slaves . . . freedom is not possible without slavery. Lawrence Keitt, Congressman from South Carolina, in a speech to the House on January 25, 1860: African slavery is the corner-stone of the industrial, social, and political fabric of the South; and whatever wars against it, wars ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, civil rights, civil war, presidential election
  • Civil War - 3,706 words
    ... iority. They also feared competition from freed slaves for their trades. The economic viability of slavery is a debatable issue. Slavery as an efficient labor system was not feasible, as the slaves did not have enough compulsion to do more than would be extracted from them by force. Slavery made the souths economic system less flexible and progressive. The success of plantation agriculture hindered the growth of a more diversified economy. The reluctance of white men to work as a free labor force due to the social stigma attached to it meant that the economy never progressed beyond the rural character to industrialization uniformly. Huge profits were made by businessmen at the expense of ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, causes of the civil war, civil government, civil war
  • Civil War Ap Paper - 940 words
    Civil War (Ap Paper) 02-23-2001 The name Civil War is misleading because the war was not a class struggle, but a sectional combat, having its roots in political, economic, social, and psychological elements. It has been characterized, in the words of William H. Seward, as the irrepressible conflict. In another judgment the Civil War was viewed as criminally stupid, an unnecessary bloodletting brought on by arrogant extremists and blundering politicians. Both views accept the fact that in 1861 there existed a situation that, rightly or wrongly, had come to be regarded as insoluble by peaceful means. In the days of the American Revolution and of the adoption of the Constitution, differences be ...
    Related: civil war, john c calhoun, presidential election, half free, destructive
  • Civil War In Us - 402 words
    Civil War In US The annexation of Texas to the United States and the gain of new territory by the Treaty of Guadeloupe Hidalgo aggravated the hostility between the North and South. The controversial issue of slavery in the new territories arose again along with many other political differences that needed to be resolved. In the midst of fear that the southern states might withdraw from the Union altogether, Senator Henry Clay of Kentucky created a series of five legislative enactments. These enactments, known as the Compromise of 1850, answer the question of whether slavery was to be sanctioned or prohibited in the newly acquired regions. The first two measures included the admission of Cali ...
    Related: civil war, henry clay, final solution, kansas nebraska, senator
  • Civil War Inevitability - 1,220 words
    Civil War Inevitability THE INEVITABILITY OF THE BREAKUP OF THE UNION By Sam Tooker The breakup of the Union was inevitable. The south was always going to secede; it was just a question of when. The southern and northern states varied on many issues. There were deep economic, social, and political differences between the north and the south. All of this was a different interpretation of the United States Constitution on both sides. In the end, all of these disagreements led to the Civil War. There were reasons other than slavery for the souths secession.(5) The south relied heavily on agriculture, as opposed to the north which was highly populated by factories. The south grew cotton, which w ...
    Related: civil war, inevitability, kansas-nebraska act, republican party, utah
  • Constitution - 1,401 words
    ... to resist the reenslaving a man on the coast of America.' In the flyer created by an abolitionist, it pointed out that man was able to capture free or runaway slaves' to be on the lookout. This flyer had no right to allow whites to kidnap a man due to the color of his skin, free or runaway. Transcendentalists such as Emerson and Thoreau, both supported a variety of reforms, especially the antislavery movement. Emerson's essays argued for self-reliance, independent thinking and the primacy of spiritual, matters over material ones. Thoreau used observations of nature to discover essential truths about life and the universe. The Fugitive Slave Law is definitely a reason why the Constitutio ...
    Related: constitution, runaway slaves, compromise of 1850, white house, determining
  • Events In Slavery - 996 words
    ... to organize a territorial government, which could then open the way to lay down railroad tracks. Southern senators, however, balked at any bill that would allow the ban on slavery in the territories to continue. Douglas reworked his bill. His new proposal divided the area into two territories: that of Kansas and that of Nebraska. It was implied, but not started, that Kansas would become a slave state, and Nebraska would be free of slavery. He also proposed an idea called Popular Sovereignty, or the right of the voters in each territory to decide whether to become a free or slave state. The bill rendered the Missouri Compromise meaningless. Congress passed the Kansas-Nebraska act in 1854. ...
    Related: slavery, popular sovereignty, right to vote, confederate states, freedmen
  • Individuals That Contributed To The Civil War - 1,912 words
    Individuals That Contributed To The Civil War Who Were Some of the Individuals That Contributed to the Coming of the Civil War The Civil War was brought about by many important people, some that wanted to preserve and some that wanted to eradicate the primary cause of the war, slavery. There were the political giants, such as Abraham Lincoln, and Stephen Douglas. There were seditious abolitionists such as John Brown, escaped slaves such as Dred Scott, and abolitionist writers like Harriet Beecher Stowe. These were the people who, ultimately, brought a beginning to the end of what Lincoln called "a moral, a social, and a political wrong"(Oates 66). Southern states, including the 11 states tha ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, causes of the civil war, civil war, abraham lincoln
  • John Browns Raid On The Federal Armory At Harpers Ferry, Virginia, In October 1859, Involved - 382 words
    John Brown's raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, In October 1859, involved only a handful of abolitionists, freed no slaves, and was over in two days. Although many Northerners condemned the raid, by 1863 John Brown had become a hero and a martyr in the North. The views about John Brown expressed in the documents illustrate the strained relationship between the North and South before the civil war(1859-1860) and the severely crippled relationship after the civil war. In 1859 before the Civil war the Northern-Southern relationship was strained with such laws as the Kansas-Nebraska act, 'legalizing' slavery through popular soveirgnty in the territories, and the Dredd Scott d ...
    Related: harpers ferry, john brown, raid, kansas-nebraska act, popular sovereignty
  • Lincoln - 2,328 words
    Lincoln Abraham Lincoln, Honest Abe, is one of the greatest American Presidents. He is known today for his Presidency in which he fought the Confederacy during the Civil War and abolished slavery with the Emancipation Proclamation and later the Thirteenth Amendment. He was an intelligent, honest, and just leader who governed at a critical time in American history. PRE-PRESIDENCY Lincoln was born on the twelfth of February 1809 in a cabin three miles outside of Hodgenville, Kentucky. He was later forced to move to Indiana. As a child Lincoln worked on his familys farm clearing fields and tending crops. He liked to read but unfortunately received hardly any formal education. In fact, his entir ...
    Related: abraham lincoln, lincoln, illinois senate, state legislature, injustice
  • Lincolns Journey To Emancipation - 1,447 words
    Lincolns Journey to Emancipation He comes to us in the mists of legend as a kind of homespun Socrates, brimming with prarie wit and folk wisdom. There is a counterlegend of Lincoln, one shared ironically enough by many white Southerners and certain black Americans of our time. Neither of these views, of course, reveals much about the man who really lived--legend and political interpretations seldom do. As a man, Lincoln was complex, many-sided, and richly human. He was an intense, brooding person, he was plagued with chronic depression most of his life. At the time he even doubted his ability to please or even care about his wife. Lincoln remained a moody, melancholy man, given to long intro ...
    Related: emancipation, emancipation proclamation, northern democrats, foreign policy, expansion
  • North Vs South - 1,175 words
    North Vs. South The Civil War Causes of the civil war 200 Years of Slavery In 1808, congress prohibited importing anymore slaves into the country. But Slavery still went on until 1850. That was was about the two hundredth year it had existed in the United States. They had sent several thousand slaves back to what is now Liberia. Eli Whitney and the Cotton Gin Eli Whitney was in Savannah, Georgia visiting a friend. Whitney was a Yale college graduate. He invented an easy to make and cheap cotton gin that was very profitable. It removed the seeds from cotton. How Cotton Affected Slaves After the cotton gin and the cotton press had been invented, production was increased a lot. The slaves were ...
    Related: north star, south carolina, northern states, jefferson davis, maryland
  • 35 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2