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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: journalistic

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  • A Call To Arms Style And Tone - 525 words
    A Call to Arms - Style and Tone A Call to Arms - Style and Tone "After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain" (332). This last line of the novel gives an understanding of Ernest Hemingway's style and tone. The overall tone of the book is much different than that of The Sun Also Rises. The characters in the book are propelled by outside forces, in this case WWI, where the characters in The Sun Also Rises seemed to have no direction. Frederick's actions are determined by his position until he deserts the army. Floating down the river with barely a hold on a piece of wood his life, he abandons everything except Catherine and lets the river take him to ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell to arms, tone, stream of consciousness, love story
  • Andy Worhal - 1,891 words
    Andy Worhal Andy Worhal Andy Warhol, the American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and film maker was born in Pittsburgh on August 6, 1928, shortly afterwards settling in New York. The only son of immigrant, Czech parents, Andy finished high school and went on to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, graduating in 1949 with hopes of becoming an art teacher in the public schools. While in Pittsburgh, he worked for a department store arranging window displays, and often was asked to simply look for ideas in fashion magazines . While recognizing the job as a waste of time, he recalls later that the fashion magazines "gave me a sense of style and other career opportunities." Upon ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, jasper johns, corporate image, rows
  • Atomic - 2,303 words
    Atomic Bomb Then a tremendous flash of light cut across the sky . Mr. Tanimoto has a distinct recollection that it traveled from east to west, from the city toward the hills. It seemed like a sheet of sun. РJohn Hersey, from Hiroshima, pp.8 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was slightly bigger than an ordinary bomb, yet could cause infinitely more destruction. It could rip through walls and tear down houses like the devils wrecking ball. In Hiroshima it killed 100,000 people, most non-military civilians. Three day ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, albert einstein, cuban missile, eliminate
  • Barrons Book Notes - 5,371 words
    BARRON'S BOOK NOTES ERICH MARIA REMARQUE'S ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT ^^^^^^^^^^ERICH MARIA REMARQUE: THE AUTHOR AND HIS TIMES Born Erich Paul Remark on June 22, 1898, he grew up in a Roman Catholic family in Osnabruck in the province of Westphalia, Germany--a city in the northwest part of what is now West Germany. He adored his mother, Anna Maria, but was never close to his father, Peter. The First World War effectively shut him off from his sisters, Elfriede and Erna. Peter Remark, descended from a family that fled to Germany after the French Revolution, earned so little as a bookbinder that the family had to move 11 times between 1898 and 1912. The family's poverty drove Remarque as a ...
    Related: book notes, notes, prisoners of war, west germany, volunteer
  • Bill Howe The Printing Press Vital Yesterday And Today I Believe That Everyone Has Heard The Phrase, The Pen Is Mightier Than - 1,087 words
    Bill Howe THE PRINTING PRESS - VITAL YESTERDAY AND TODAY I believe that everyone has heard the phrase, "The pen is mightier than the sword." This statement I cannot argue, but the point I want to make is that the printing press is the mightiest of them all. The origin of printing itself was only the first stage in the development of books as we know them. To understand the modern book, one should know of its history and realize the gradual process it came from since the pre-written manuscript. THERE WERE FOUR DISTINCT PHASES IN THIS METAMORPHOSIS (Butler xi). 1. In the beginning, this was just a means for performing a writer's work more quickly, neatly, and cheaply than was possible by hand ...
    Related: howe, printing, printing press, vital, yesterday
  • Boundaries Of Ownership - 2,946 words
    ... Court decision in an earlier case. Blackmun, treading carefully along a fine line between the different kinds of rights accorded to different kinds of owners, stresses that infringement of copyright does not easily equate with theft, conversion or fraud. . . . The infringer invades a statutorily defined province guaranteed to the copyright holder alone. But he does not assume physical control over the copyright; nor does he wholly deprive its owner of its use. While one may colloquially liken infringement with some general notion of wrongful appropriation, infringement plainly implicates a more complex set of property interests than does run-of-the-mill theft, conversion or fraud. Howeve ...
    Related: ownership, technological tools, more important, personal financial, tech
  • Charles Dickens - 1,040 words
    Charles Dickens Charles John Huffam Dickens was born February 7, 1812, in Ports Mouth, Hampshire. In his infancy his family moved to Chatham, where he spent his happiest years and often refers to this time in his novels (1817-1822). From 1822 to 1860 he lived in London, after which he permanently moved to a quiet country cottage in Glads Hill, on the outskirts of Chatham. He grew up in a middle class family. His father was a clerk in the navy pay office and was well paid, but his extravagant living style often brought the family to financial disaster. The family reached financial "rock bottom" in 1824. Charles was taken out of school and sent to work in a factory doing manual labour, while h ...
    Related: charles dickens, christmas carol, oliver twist, historical novel, navy
  • Darwinism - 214 words
    Darwinism Darwin doesn't work here any more Richard Milton spent some twenty years studying the geology and palaeontology of the British Isles before writing Shattering the Myths of Darwinism. It was the absence of transitional fossilsthat first made me question Darwin's idea of gradual change. I realised, too, that the procedures used to date rocks were circular.Rocks are used to date fossils: fossils are used to date rocks. From here I began to think the unthinkable: could Darwinism be scientifically flawed? I became an almost daily visitor at the Natural History Museum, looking more closely again at all the famous evidence I had been taught about:the evolution of horses, Archaeopteryx -- ...
    Related: darwinism, natural history, human sexuality, british isles, stone
  • Defoe Moll Flanders - 736 words
    Defoe Moll Flanders J Johnson English Novel to 1832 7/10/00 Moll Flanders: Freedom or Fate In New Hampshire I had a Philosophy teacher that used to say, and I believe he was quoting another, People who believe in freewill are ignorant of the reasons of their actions. This quote, in the context of Defoes Moll Flanders, brings about a multitude of questions and discussion. Was Flanders free or was she predetermined to live a wicked and improper life mired in years of penitence? Was the fact that her mother a whore before her enough to dismiss the question? It is, in fact, these questions that persuaded me to abandon my philosophy major and follow my love of literature, but that is a different ...
    Related: defoe, flanders, moll, moll flanders, first offense
  • Eric Glave 266 Words - 1,669 words
    Eric Glave 266 Words ECO 2013 "Death of Outrage" By William J. Bennet William J. Bennett, secretary of education and chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities under President Reagan captured the public imagination with the best-selling Book of Virtues, a compendium of other people's writing that had something to teach about morality. In his new book, Bennett advances his own credo of right and wrong, and it is far less compelling. It is a slim book with a correspondingly slim premise: that the American public's failure to be outraged at President Clinton's lies about his private life is evidence of our moral and intellectual disarmament. The book has six brief chapters with the gran ...
    Related: eric, hillary clinton, white house, monica lewinsky, excuse
  • Ernest Miller Hemingway: His Influences - 1,274 words
    Ernest Miller Hemingway: His Influences Ernest Miller Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Illinois, on July 21, 1899. From a young man interested in sport and drink, Hemingway grew into and old man who was interested in sport and drink. Al1ong the way he became one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century. Throughout his life, he had many influences. Among them were; his wounding in Italy, his time in Paris as an expatriate, and his love of sport and excitement. These things helped shape Hemingways life, and, as will soon be shown, Hemingways art imitated his life very often. After graduating from High School, Hemingway soon went to work for the Kansas City Star, which was, at that time, ...
    Related: ernest, ernest miller hemingway, influences, miller, gertrude stein
  • Freedom Of Press - 2,698 words
    ... steady drumbeat of coverage, pounding on the same few facts amid great speculation, historical reminiscences, and anecdotes. Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism said that, "In 12 hours of coverage, there were only about 10 minutes' worth of actual facts." Stephen Lacy, acting director of Michigan State University's School of Journalism in East Lansing said through the coverage of the Kennedy tragedy, he saw, "a bigger disconnect between the press and the public. It was a bit of overkill, especially on television." He went on to say that "The media have not quite realized that overplaying does not help their credibility, but continues to show examples of t ...
    Related: associated press, free press, freedom of expression, freedom of the press, westview press
  • George Orwell Research - 1,003 words
    ... y Orwell as the “Political book...a sort of enlarged pamphlet combining history with political critiscism”. Orwell came to believe that Homage to Catalonia was the best book he had ever written. During winter in 1938, Orwell wrote his sixth novel Coming Up for Air. It is the discovery of George Bowling, that his boy-hood home has changed like everything else. It is regarded as his best novel (with the exception of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four). It illustrates in great detail, the fact that everything peacefull eventually becomes corupt. After Coming Up for Air, Orwell wrote one of his most-loved novels, Animal Farm. It is the “fairy story” of an animal revolut ...
    Related: george orwell, orwell, big brother, manor farm, bowling
  • I Know, I Know, I Was Just Kidding, Lindberg Lied Give Me A - 1,978 words
    ... cking. Floating in the back of my mind was an image of Mary Striker and my mom sitting in the staff lounge at the Thistle Shopper's Mall huddled around a direct line to Winnipeg. At that moment I rationalized I was far too new at this job to be handcuffed by anything so stuffy as professional pride. I ripped the bloody page off the machine and read it. From this Thistle and I learned that, in fact, there was a lone, masked gunman holding several hostages inside the Northern Isles Credit Union and that police were currently negotiating for their safe release. The suspect was also reported to have several sticks of dynamite strapped to his waist. Primer cord ran from these to a battery pac ...
    Related: lindberg, town council, late night, main street, journalistic
  • Ida B Wellsbarnett - 1,522 words
    Ida B. Wells-Barnett IDA B. WELLS-BARNETT Ida B. Wells-Barnett is first among many. She was a civil servant and fought injustices amongst the black community. Ida was born a slave in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1862. There she witnessed the Civil War and the dramatic changes it brought to her life. During Reconstruction she found possession of previously unheard-of freedoms, her civil rights. The most dramatic change was the institution of schools for the education of blacks. The establishment of the Freedman's Aid Society founded by Shaw University, later renamed Rust College, and was where Ida attended classes. Ida possessed an interest in school, and she quickly worked her way through e ...
    Related: booker t. washington, supreme court, the awakening, mississippi, suit
  • In The Belly Of The Beast By Jack Henry Abbott And Newjack By Ted Conover - 576 words
    In The Belly Of The Beast by Jack Henry Abbott and Newjack by Ted Conover Jack Henry Abbott's book, In The Belly Of The Beast is as autobiographical account of the authors lifelong experiences in penal institutions while serving time for numerous petty crimes as a child to murder in later years. He offers a wide array of attacks on various American institutions in society while trying to defend his position as "victim" of societys pitfalls. The self-educated author encapsulates the reader by presenting stories, through letters, of the horrific reality of prison life. Although considered psychopathic, his rendition lends an enormous amount of insight and allows us to feel a need to reform a p ...
    Related: abbott, beast, belly, conover, jack
  • It Seems That There Is An Everincreasing Trend In Our Society Big Corporations Are Becoming More And More Influential In Our - 999 words
    It seems that there is an ever-increasing trend in our society. Big corporations are becoming more and more influential in our lives. As they gain more and more muscle in our government they also invade our schools and many other facets of our lives. Perhaps the most disturbing area of potential influence, however, is corporate control of the media. Can the American media uphold its values of free press under pressure from big corporations? Can they continue to present the absolute truth? The simple answer, especially in my opinion, is no. The movie The Insider provides us with an excellent case to back that point of view. Perhaps one of the biggest stories of this decade has been the tobacc ...
    Related: influential, trend, absolute truth, profit margin, sharp
  • Journalismmediatelevision - 1,502 words
    Journalism/Media/Television Journalism/Media/Television 27 Influential Years of 60 Minutes 27 Years of Influential 60 Minutes Since 1968 America has been better enlightened than previously concerning current events and happenings around the world. A considerable factor for this occurrence is the television program 60 Minutes which debuted on the air in September of 1968. Many other television newsmagazines have been produced since its creation, however none have possessed the longevity nor the influence of 60 Minutes. In fact, 60 Minutes, which is owned by CBS News, was the first regular network news program to cover actual stories as opposed to topics. Today, similar newsmagazines can be se ...
    Related: television programs, american people, news program, surprising, scan
  • Libel And Invasion Of Privacy - 1,182 words
    Libel And Invasion Of Privacy Libel and invasion of privacy Libel and invasion of privacy are two very important issues dealing with broadcast media. The two are very similar but different from each. Libel deals more with what was actually printed or broadcast, where as invasion of privacy deals with how the information was actually gathered. Both have laws to regulate and influence what kind of information is gathered and, how it is actually obtained Libel simply is defamation of character by published word, the publishing of falsities to hurt a person's reputation or standing. However, now it is not limited to only printed word as in newspapers or magazines. Slander, which is defined as de ...
    Related: invasion, invasion of privacy, libel, privacy, privacy issues
  • Lift Every Voice And Sing By James Weldon Johnson - 1,551 words
    Lift Every Voice And Sing By James Weldon Johnson The author of Lift Every Voice and Sing (often called the Negro National Anthem), James Weldon Johnson had a long career as a creative writer, black leader, teacher, lawyer, diplomat, and executive secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Through his writing he protested racial injustice, encouraged black achievement, and added immeasurably to the wealth of American literary art. A native of Jacksonville, Florida, Johnson attended Atlanta University through graduate school. In 1901 he became the first African American admitted to the Florida Bar, but he did not re-main in Florida very long. Forming a creati ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, lift, sing, weldon, weldon johnson
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