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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: joseph conrad

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  • Amy Foster By Joseph Conrad And The Mythology Of Love By Joseph Campbell - 1,005 words
    Amy Foster by Joseph Conrad and The Mythology of Love by Joseph Campbell In "Amy Foster", Joseph Conrad has written a great story that shows the different types of love felt between Amy and Yanko as described by Joseph Campbell in his essay on "The Mythology of Love". The relationship of Yanko and Amy is dynamic and changes as the story progresses. At first, Amy feels compassion for Yanko; she does not see the differences between him and the English people as the others of Brenzett do. However, later in the story, compassion turns to passion. Amy's son is then born; distinctions appear and she is either no longer able to love Yanko or she loves Yanko to such an extent that she finds she is i ...
    Related: campbell, conrad, foster, joseph, joseph campbell, joseph conrad, mythology
  • Heart Of Darkness By Joseph Conrad - 1,173 words
    Heart of Darkness By Joseph Conrad Heart of Darkness By Joseph Conrad Main Characters Marlow - Young man who decides that it would be exiting to travel into Africa hunting ivory and does so by taking the place of a dead steamboat captain. Kurts - Famous man among the ivory seekers who has lived and hunted on the continent for a while and has exploited the savages becoming much like a savage himself. Russian fool - Man who is known by his clothes with many colorful patches making him look much like a harlequin. He works with Kurtz who proves to be poor company for him. The Intended - Kurtzs bride to be who at the end of the book still thinks that Kurtz was the great man that she remembered hi ...
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  • Heart Of Darkness By Joseph Conrad - 1,209 words
    Heart Of Darkness By Joseph Conrad There have been few novels that have had the ability to change my perspectives about life and the world around us. Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad, is not one of them. Not because I disagree with or dislike his work. He cant, after all, change my outlook on life if he and I share the same opinions. One such thing is reflected in how our view of Kurtz is not too far from Marlows own, in the beginning, middle, or end of the book. This is, of course, not to say that our opinions and views of Kurtz do not change. Far from it. However, as Marlows myopic views of Kurtz melt away in the light of truth (which ironically revealed nothing but darkness), ours do a ...
    Related: conrad, darkness, heart of darkness, joseph, joseph conrad
  • Joseph Conrad - 2,002 words
    Joseph Conrad Conrad's novel, Heart of Darkness, relies on the historical period of imperialism in order to describe its protagonist, Charlie Marlow, and his struggle. Marlow's catharsis in the novel, as he goes to the Congo, rests on how he visualizes the effects of imperialism. This paper will analyze Marlow's "change," as caused by his exposure to the imperialistic nature of the historical period in which he lived. Marlow is asked by "the company", the organization for whom he works, to travel to the Congo river and report back to them about Mr. Kurtz, a top notch officer of theirs. When he sets sail, he doesn't know what to expect. When his journey is completed, this little "trip" will h ...
    Related: conrad, joseph, joseph conrad, charlie marlow, congo river
  • Joseph Conrad - 1,981 words
    ... eans apply the terms 'enemy' and'criminals' to the natives. In actuality, they are simply "bewildered and helpless victims...and moribund shadows"(Berthoud. 46). Clearly, the injustice done by the simple misnaming of someone is unbelievable. After witnessing all of these names which bare no true meaning, as well as possibly degrade a person's character, Marlow understands that he can not continue in his former ways of mindlessly giving random names to something in fear of diminishing the essence of the recipient. As a result, Marlow finds himself unable to label something for what it is. While under attack, Marlow reefers to the arrows being shot in his direction as "sticks, little stick ...
    Related: conrad, joseph, joseph conrad, moral code, true meaning
  • Joseph Conrad - 885 words
    Joseph Conrad In Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, there is a great interpretation of the feelings of the characters and uncertainties of the Congo. Although Africa, nor the Congo are ever really referred to, the Thames river is mentioned as support. This intricate story reveals much symbolism due to Conrad's theme based on the lies and good and evil, which interact together in every man. Today, of course, the situation has changed. Most literate people know that by probing into the heart of the jungle Conrad was trying to convey an impression about the heart of man, and his tale is universally read as one of the first symbolic masterpieces of English prose (Graver,28). In any event, this s ...
    Related: conrad, joseph, joseph conrad, thames river, different aspects
  • Africa - 1,680 words
    Africa European Imperialism European Imperialism European expansion was almost a certainty. The continent was relatively poor place for agriculture, which pushed Europeans outside of Europe in search of new soil. Different countries sent explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, to find unknown trade routes to India and Asia. They stumbled onto new sources for raw materials and goods and Europe was suddenly substantially profiting. The exploration of Africa, Asia, and South America provided new wealth. It increased the standard of living for Europeans, introduced them to spices, luxurious goods, silver, and gold (class notes). Later revolutions and reformers throughout the 19th and 20th centuri ...
    Related: africa, africa asia, power over, european society, indochina
  • Apocalypse Now And Heart Of Darkness - 992 words
    Apocalypse Now And Heart Of Darkness Placed in various time periods and settings, the novel Heart of Darkness, written by Joseph Conrad, and the movie Apocalypse Now, produced and directed by Francis Ford Coppola, both create the same mysterious journey with various similarties and differences. The journeys mystery lies in the scene; it is one down a river by boat, deep in the jungle. The jungle is populated mainly with wild animals and a few natives. The reason for the expedition is to search for a sick man named Kurtz, who is followed by the natives and his men from their previous missions. In Heart of Darkness, the journey to find Kurtz, who is an ivory trader who has gone too deep into t ...
    Related: apocalypse, apocalypse now, darkness, heart of darkness, daily life
  • Colonialism And The Heart Of Darkness - 705 words
    Colonialism And The Heart Of Darkness Colonialism and the Heart of Darkness Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad, is a work that strongly attacks colonialism and its affects not only upon the native population but also upon the colonizers invading the land. Conrad experienced being colonized as a young boy in a Poland under Russian occupation. He also witnessed the affects of colonialism upon a colonizer while he commanded a river steamer in the Dutch Congo. He relays these experiences through the eyes of his character Marlow who is a riverboat captain as well. The attacks upon colonialism come in three classes: directly, ironically, and metaphorically. Conrad attacks colonialism directly thr ...
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  • Colonization In The Theme Of Conrads Heart Of Darkness And Swifts A Modest Proposal - 1,856 words
    Colonization In The Theme Of Conrads Heart Of Darkness And Swift's A Modest Proposal Joseph Riley McCormack Professor Alan Somerset English 020 Section 007 Submission Date: March 22, 2000 Colonization in the Theme of A Modest Proposal and Heart of Darkness Starting at the beginning of the seventeenth century, European countries began exploring and colonizing many different areas of the world. The last half of the nineteenth century saw the height of European colonial power around the globe. France, Belgium, Germany, and especially Great Britain, controlled over half the world. Along with this achievement came a notable sense of pride and confident belief that European civilization was the be ...
    Related: colonization, darkness, heart of darkness, jonathan swift, joseph conrad, modest, modest proposal
  • Feminist Imagery In Joseph Conrads Heart Of Darkness - 1,243 words
    Feminist Imagery In Joseph Conrad's Heart Of Darkness Feminist Imagery in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Many feminist critics have used Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness to show how Marolw constructs parallels and personification betwee women and the inanimate jungle that he speaks of. The jungle that houses the savages and the remarkable Kurtz has many feminine characteristics. By the end of the novel, it is the same feminized wilderness and darkness that Marlow identifies as being the cause of Kurtz's mental and physical collapse. In Heart of Darkness, the landscape is feminized through a rhetoric of personification. The landscape is constructed as an entity that speaks and acts, and i ...
    Related: darkness, feminist, heart of darkness, imagery, joseph, joseph conrad
  • Heart - 369 words
    Heart Of Darkness "And this also," said Marlow Suddenly, "has been one of the dark places of the earth." He was the only man who still "followed the sea." The worst that could be said of him was that he did not represent his class. Why did you think that this exert was the most significant? I thought this exert was most significant because I thought that when Marlows first words were "And this also has been one of the dark places of the earth," introduce the image of darkness that dominates the whole story. From this point on Marlow tells the main narrative. The darkness of the title is the major theme of the book, but the meaning of that darkness is never clearly defined. Darkness stands fo ...
    Related: heart of darkness, writing skills, the jungle, classic literature, joseph
  • Heart - 1,804 words
    ... s misrepresentation, meeting a man who is called the "bricklayer". However, as Marlow himself points out, "there wasn't a fragment of a brick anywhere in the station"(Conrad, 39). During his voyage, however, Marlow doesn't only observe this misnaming, but realizes the importance of a name. While overhearing a conversation between the manager of the station and his uncle, he hears Mr. Kurtz being referred to as "that man"(Conrad, 53). Although Marlow hasn't met Kurtz yet, he has heard of his greatness. He now realizes that by these men calling him "that man", they strip him of all his attributes. When one hears Kurtz, they think of a " very remarkable person"(Conrad, 39). These men are no ...
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  • Heart - 1,759 words
    Heart Of Darkness By Conrad Author: Joseph Conrad Setting: The storyteller, Charlie Marlow, sits on the deck of the Nellie recanting his journey to the Congo and his perception and encounter with Kurtz and Kurtz's intended. Plot: The telling of a remarkable horror tale to the inner darkness of man, Kurtz/Marlow, and the center of the earth, the Congo. Charlie Marlow gives the accounts of the double journey to the passengers on the deck of the Nellie as she is held still by the tides. Key Characters Charlie Marlow "Deviant" [narrator (Conrad) to the reader 1] We are given a visual picture of a ship, the Nellie, going out to sea on the Thames. The narrator describes the Director of Companies, ...
    Related: heart of darkness, avant garde, east india, charlie marlow, pilgrim
  • Heart - 636 words
    Heart Of Darkness By Conrad In the novella Heart if Darkness by Joseph Conrad Marlow and Kurtz undergo similar journeys through the most evil and dark regions of their psyche; however, Marlow is able to realize the darkness inside him and retain his soul before he reverts to a savage animal-like Kurtz has. Marlows disillusionment begins as he arrives on the shore of Africa. When he first arrives on the coast of Africa he sees a large warship bombarding the overgrown forest that has encroached on the beach. This firing is random and is only pointless destruction. He sees the natives, and the people view them as their enemies. Marlow thinks of them as enemies at first, however when he sees the ...
    Related: heart of darkness, the manager, joseph conrad, human mind, savage
  • Heart - 371 words
    Heart Of Darkness And Maslow "And this also," said Marlow Suddenly, "has been one of the dark places of the earth." He was the only man who still "followed the sea." The worst that could be said of him was that he did not represent his class. Why did you think that this exert was the most significant? I thought this exert was most significant because I thought that when Marlows first words were "And this also has been one of the dark places of the earth," introduce the image of darkness that dominates the whole story. From this point on Marlow tells the main narrative. The darkness of the title is the major theme of the book, but the meaning of that darkness is never clearly defined. Darknes ...
    Related: heart of darkness, the jungle, joseph conrad, writing skills, recommend
  • Heart Of Darkness - 1,777 words
    Heart Of Darkness Every man or woman has buried within themselves a dark side, savage side. When a man is taken out of society and left to create his own norms, he rediscovers those instincts, which have laid dormant since the beginning of existence. Survival of the fittest, physically and intellectually, is the foundation of these instincts. Persons who dominate one or many through mental or physical powers develop a sense of superiority. This feeling, if fostered by the environment, and intensified to an extreme, produces a sense of having God-like powers. A man believing himself to be a or the God is seen as a wicked person or a monster. Since monsters can not be allowed to roam the civil ...
    Related: darkness, heart of darkness, mental disorder, t. s. eliot, perception
  • Heart Of Darkness - 1,313 words
    Heart Of Darkness Heart Of Darkness Whether a reader connects to the symbolism of Heart Of Darkness or is merely reading it for fun, one cannot go away from this story without a lingering feeling of uneasiness. Joseph Conrad writes what seems to be a simple story about a man in search of an ivory hunter; one must look deeper into the jungle which makes up the core of Heart Of Darkness , where Conrad hides the meanings and symbolisms that shape this story. Conrad has been accused of being a racist because of the way he portrays the natives in this story. It is a controversy that continues even today. It can be argued that because of the way he depicts the natives, they cannot be an essential ...
    Related: darkness, darkness heart, heart of darkness, joseph conrad, the jungle
  • Heart Of Darkness - 1,362 words
    Heart Of Darkness Throughout the story, Heart of Darkness, there is a thin line between what is seen as reality and what is illusion. The main character soon realizes that he has different interpretations of events and physical things than that of the Europeans. Charlie Marlow first realizes how many things, events and even people, in Africa, seemed misnamed by the Europeans, distorting them from what they truly are. Consequently he is wary of labeling something in case he might misname it and as a result devalue it. In the end, Kurtz, who has already reached enlightenment, will be the one to teach Marlow, though not directly, the significance of a name. Charlie Marlow is the only one to be ...
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  • Heart Of Darkness - 960 words
    Heart Of Darkness One of the most memorable moments for many students will occur when they see Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, the first part of a prequel trilogy to the beloved Star Wars trilogy. The original three films Star Wars: A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi have embedded themselves in our current culture. The Force, composer John William's famous soundtrack, and lines such as Luke, I am your father(which is never said in any of the movies) have become common in present day culture. But, the Star Wars trilogy also contains a deeper theme that is not unique to the current time period. In George Lucas's Star Wars Trilogy as well in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Dark ...
    Related: darkness, heart of darkness, george lucas, the jungle, clothing
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