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  • John D Rockefeller - 1,200 words
    John D. Rockefeller During the late 1800's and early 1900's the oil industry was a monopoly that was created by one man. Some people would describe this man as a ruthless, cruel, cutthroat business tycoon. This man was John Davison Rockefeller. John D. Rockefeller made the Standard Oil Company, becoming America's first billionaire, and then gave away more than half his fortune to charities. John Rockefeller was a dedicated businessman who built himself an empire from nothing and helped others with his generous donations. His business ended up helping smaller businesses because of the new laws and restrictions that needed to be created in order for the U.S. government to have a handle on the ...
    Related: john d rockefeller, rockefeller, baptist church, atlantic coast, monopoly
  • John D Rockefeller - 1,105 words
    ... vol. 13 227). Rockefeller was a careful planner and wanted to waste as little as possible. Rockefeller changed the thinking in businesses because he was a first to own all the materials to run a large business. Soon Standard began refining crude oil, moving westward and it began foreign markets in Europe, Asia and Latin America and at this point it was almost a monopoly (J.D.R. Encyclopedia of World Biography vol. 13 227). Rockefeller was becoming so powerful and around this time many rumors about how he ran his business started to come out and he got a reputation as being a cold-hearted money lover, which was actually pretty accurate. Andrew Carnegie was a John Rockefeller of steel, ju ...
    Related: john d rockefeller, rockefeller, rockefeller center, world biography, york city
  • John D Rockefeller: Obsession Into Success - 1,249 words
    John D. Rockefeller: Obsession Into Success John D. Rockefeller, the Standard Oil magnate who, by the time of his death in 1937, was probably worth close to a billion dollars, is perhaps one of the best historical examples of an obsessive-compulsive. An obsessive-compulsive is one who is driven to an act or acts, generally being asocial, by his own fixations but by nature of his peculiar psyche must balance these actions with others more socially acceptable. There are abundant examples of Rockefeller's deeds fitting these clinical characteristics, and John D. Rockefeller is today generally regarded as an obsessive-compulsive. The roots of this disorder are traceable back to his childhood. Wh ...
    Related: john d rockefeller, obsession, civil war, order of magnitude, genius
  • Was John D Rockefeller A Robber Baron - 2,126 words
    Was John D. Rockefeller A Robber Baron? PART ONE - Issue #2: Was John D. Rockefeller a Robber Baron? A "robber baron" was someone who employed any means necessary to enrich themselves at the expense of their competitors. Did John D. Rockefeller fall into that category or was he one of the "captains of industry", whose shrewd and innovative leadership brought order out of industrial chaos and generated great fortunes that enriched the public welfare through the workings of various philanthropic agencies that these leaders established? In the early 1860s Rockefeller was the founder of the Standard Oil Company, who came to epitomize both the success and excess of corporate capitalism. His compa ...
    Related: baron, john d rockefeller, robber, robber baron, rockefeller
  • Was John D Rockefeller A Robber Baron - 2,202 words
    ... nd the Great Depression", did not believe that the New Deal was effective to the depression. It was marked by vacillation, confusion, and contradictions; by in frightening within the administration, bureaucracies, by an absence of any consistently held theory about either the causes of depression or how to end it. The New Dealers failed to arrive at any real consensus about the origins and nature of the economic concentration. Roosevelt's inconsistency was apolitical asset rather than a liability. He masterfully disguised the inadequacies and internal disagreements in his entourage and to a remarkable extent succeeded in convincing the Americans of their own personal wisdom (Garrity 920) ...
    Related: baron, john d rockefeller, robber, robber baron, rockefeller
  • Aliens - 1,911 words
    Aliens -- Copyright Information -- 1999 SIRS Mandarin, Inc. -- SIRS Researcher Spring 1999 Title: Scientists: UFO Reports May Be Worth Evaluating Author: Michelle Levander Source: San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, CA) Publication Date: June 28, 1998 Page Number(s): n.p. --------------------------- SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS (San Jose, Calif.) June 28, 1998, n.p. (c) 1998, Knight-Ridder Newspapers. Distributed by Knight-Ridder/Tribune Information Services. SCIENTISTS: UFO REPORTS MAY BE WORTH EVALUATING by Michelle Levander Mercury News Staff Writer For more than 50 years, UFO investigators have scoured the skies for signs of alien life--completely snubbed by the scientific community as cranks. Bu ...
    Related: aliens, central intelligence agency, stanford university, staff writer, rockefeller
  • American Monopolies - 1,092 words
    American Monopolies According to Webster , to have a monopoly is to have exclusive ownership, possession, or control. The following essay is an examination of Microsoft in comparison to this definition and another commonly known monopoly, Standard Oil. Also attention will be given to the necessary role of and problems with monopolies. Competitive Market vs. Monopoly A competitive market consists of many buyers and sellers. Markets thrive because an equilibrium price is established through natural competition and no single buyer or seller can affect that price. Instead both buyer and seller must take the price given by the market based on the dynamics of supply and demand. This competition is ...
    Related: american, personal computer, trade commission, competitive market, marketing
  • Antitrust Legislation - 1,392 words
    Anti-Trust Legislation As many people have noticed, recently there has been a huge focus in the media on Bill Gates, and his huge Microsoft Corporation. This past Friday, May 22, 1998, a federal judge combined two lawsuits and set a trial date for September 8, 1998. This trial date will address a government request for a preliminary injunction concerning Windows 98 as well as broader issues. The Sherman Anti-trust Act was passed in 1890. Then in 1914 the Clayton Act was passed to help with Anti-trust Cases. Anti-trust Lawsuits are few and far between, but recently cases against Microsoft are stacking up all around the world. In 1890 the Sherman Anti-trust Act was passed, but it was not until ...
    Related: antitrust, legislation, computer industry, public opinion, trial
  • Booker T Washington - 1,451 words
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington Booker Taliaferro Washington was the foremost black educators of the 19th and 20th centuries. He also had a major influence on southern race relations and was a dominant figure in black affairs from 1895 until his death in 1915. Booker T. Washington was born into slavery in 1858. As a slave Booker did not have a last name and chose Washington, his stepfather's name. After the Civil War Booker, his brother, and his mother moved to Malden, West Virginia were they went to live with his stepfather, whom they had only seen a few times. When they arrived in Walden, Washington was no more than 10 years old. However, he immediately went to work with his step ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, taliaferro washington, andrew carnegie
  • Business Tycoons In Us - 1,439 words
    Business Tycoons In US "The Business of the United States is Business," a great man once said. The United States has heralded around the globe for its incredible economic system. The growth of the United States started off small with minor discoveries and inventions, such as oil and electricity, and with those in place emergence of new technologies and innovations came underway. The railroads came about very slowly and became very popular. A man named Henry Bessemer came up with a way to make steel cheaply and efficiently (Bessemer Process). With the prices of steel dropping railroads were being built all across the nation. Major business tycoons, such as John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carne ...
    Related: business today, hudson river, pacific railroad, labor unions, horse
  • Business Tycoons In Us - 1,444 words
    ... y the experimenter in charge of the project. Then the group worked on it. It was impossible to give credit for an invention to any one person. The brilliant scientist was also a clever businessman. Edison wanted the streets of New York City torn up for the laying of electrical cables. So he invited the entire city council out to Menlo Park at dusk. The council members walked up a narrow staircase in the dark. As they stumbled in the dark, Edison clapped his hands. The lights came on. There in the dining hall was a feast catered by New York's best restaurant. Another great accomplishment of Edison was the invention of an entirely new way for businesses to work. Edison and his partners inv ...
    Related: business week, formal education, multimedia encyclopedia, united states steel, edition
  • Corruption And Graft - 707 words
    Corruption and Graft Following Reconstruction in the war torn South, and the Sioux Wars in the West, America was enjoying an industrialization period unlike any other. Nearly gone was the frontier, industries coming in, with men gaining unheard of wealth, and having leverage in many affairs. With the Robber Barons in control over the nations economy, and men like Oakes Ames, Leland Stanford, and William Boss Tweed, what occurred is that corruption and graft greatly influenced American industry and business between 1860 to 1900. However, labor organizations such as the Knights of Labor and AFL made steps in labor reforms and other government laws attempted to limit monopolies. Undoubtedly, th ...
    Related: corruption, graft, labor unions, president grant, market
  • Greedgreed Is A Selfish Desire For More Than One Needs Or Deserves Greed Can Make Honest Men Murderers It Has Made Countries - 788 words
    Greed Greed is a selfish desire for more than one needs or deserves. Greed can make honest men murderers. It has made countries with rich valuable resources into the poorest countries in the world. We are taught it is bad and not to practice it. But consider a world without greed, where everyone is as sharing as Mother Theresa was. The progress of humankind would be at a standstill. Greed has given our society faster travel, better service, more convenience, and most importantly, progress. Greed has created thousands of billionaires and millions of millionaires. But why is greed associated with evil? In their day, most capitalists like Cornelius Vanderbilt and John D. Rockefeller were depict ...
    Related: greed, honest, selfish, third world countries, world countries
  • Industrial Revolution - 723 words
    Industrial Revolution Corporate development during the Industrial Revolution was made in part by entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs were the people who took responsibility for the organization and operation of a new business venture. These business men often risked the initial money for setting up different types of businesses. With the risk of large sums of money, some of these entrepreneurs made enormous profits. Two major entrepreneurs of American history are John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie. The Standard Oil Company founded by John D. Rockefeller and the U.S. Steel Company founded by Andrew Carnegie, both were two corporations that had a great impact on the lives of most Americans. The ...
    Related: industrial revolution, different types, american industry, social darwinism, cruel
  • Industrialization - 640 words
    Industrialization As George Donelson Moss, author of America in the twentieth century states it; modern America emerged during the last thirty years of the nineteenth century. With most of the century consisting of farmers and smaller towns and country-like living, the later parts of the century brought industrialization and businesses. This changes forced Americans to view and live life differently. Of the important elements that influenced America in the nineteenth century, industrialization and immigration are the most significant. Industry flourished in the 1800's causing changes to America's every aspect of life. Manufacturing also increased during this time due to the many advancements ...
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  • Labor Union, Launched In 1866, And The Knights Of Labor, Which Reached Its Zenith In The Mid1880s On Their Face, These Reform - 1,510 words
    LABOR UNION, LAUNCHED IN 1866, AND THE KNIGHTS OF LABOR, WHICH REACHED ITS ZENITH IN THE MID-1880S. ON THEIR FACE, THESE REFORM MOVEMENTS MIGHT HAVE SEEMED AT ODDS WITH TRADE UNIONISM, AIMING AS THEY DID AT THE COOPERATIVE COMMONWEALTH RATHER THAN A HIGHER WAGE, APPEALING BROADLY TO ALL PRODUCERS RATHER THAN STRICTLY TO WAGEWORKERS, AND ESCHEWING THE TRADE UNION RELIANCE ON THE STRIKE AND BOYCOTT. BUT CONTEMPORARIES SAW NO CONTRADICTION: TRADE UNIONISM TENDED TO THE WORKERS'' IMMEDIATE NEEDS, LABOR REFORM TO THEIR HIGHER HOPES. THE TWO WERE HELD TO BE STRANDS OF A SINGLE MOVEMENT, ROOTED IN A COMMON WORKING-CLASS CONSTITUENCY AND TO SOME DEGREE SHARING A COMMON LEADERSHIP. BUT EQUALLY IMPORT ...
    Related: knights, labor, labor force, labor movement, labor party, labor union, labor unions
  • Laissezfaire - 1,049 words
    Laissez-Faire The American Civil War fades away. It now appears that a new social unrest has taken root in America. But the debate was to be fought in the economic world. The question was, how should the government interact with business? The issue splits into two main views, that of Laissez-faire, and that of General Welfare. Laissez-faire is a rather straight-forward philosophy. It can be best described by saying that the government should have absolutely no interaction within the business world. These thinkers trust that the governments sole purpose is to protect life and property, and that the role of government should end there. The tree of Laissez-faire has many branches, two of which ...
    Related: social gospel, economic growth, business world, absolutely, interact
  • Laissezfaire - 1,079 words
    ... f the Standard Oil Company, and Rockefeller. As the months passed, Ida Tarbell published her installments, which portrayed Rockefeller as a ruthless tycoon, obsessed with taking over control the oil industry. Miss Tarbell urged her readers not to support monopolists such as Rockefeller. She argued that a thing won by breaking the rules of the game, is not worth winning (The Gentlewomen and the Robber Barron 190). In 1909, the Standard Oil Company was accused with violation of the Sherman Act. On May 15, 1911, the U.S. Supreme Court had finally come to a decision. It found the Standard Oil Company, guilty (The Gentlewomen and the Robber Barron 191). Essentially, the supreme court agreed w ...
    Related: turning point, free competition, role model, versus, abuse
  • Microsoft - 1,120 words
    Microsoft The current Microsoft antitrust case, still in progress as this review is being written, has been both hailed and condemned as the most important antitrust action of the coming century. Its potential significance has been compared to that of the Supreme Court's 1911 Standard Oil decision, which not only applied for the first time the trust-busting power latent in the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 to break up John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company, but of at least equal importance enunciated the rule of reason on which judicial interpretation of the Sherman Act continues to be based. While none of this conference volume's contributors develops this comparison, readers may come a ...
    Related: microsoft, microsoft corporation, telecommunications services, marginal cost, facility
  • People Of Gilded Age - 1,511 words
    People Of Gilded Age After the Civil War had ended, several soldiers had returned home to find their places of living destroyed. Most of these people returned to practically nothing. The United States had to rebuild itself, and this rebuilding was called Reconstruction. Today historians refer to this era of reconstruction as the part of the Gilded Age. Many people had to pickup and start all over again, while others continued their quests of expanding. Expanding by taking control over the land or by expanding their beliefs, either way lives of these people reflected the social tensions of the Gilded Age. Philip H. Sheridan, who was one of the heroes of the Civil War, was a soldier who had st ...
    Related: black people, colored people, gilded, gilded age, western frontier
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