Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: jazz music

  • 29 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Jazz Music The Roots Of Our Everyday Life - 648 words
    Jazz Music- The Roots Of Our Everyday Life What is Jazz? According to the dictionary, jazz is defined as, A kind of syncopated, highly rhythmic music originated by Southern blacks in the late 19th century (Jazz 232). But, everyone should at least agree that jazz is the mother of all music, and is referred to as the only art form originating in the United States (History 101 2). America was home to immigrants from all over Europe and beyond who wished to build a new life, or just needed to escape from the old. These people, often thought of as second-class, brought their culture with them to America, expressed it musically, and changed the music world as we know it today. Most early jazz was ...
    Related: everyday life, jazz, jazz history, jazz music, jazz singer, music, orleans jazz
  • 65279the Establishment In The 1960s - 1,012 words
    The Establishment in the 1960's The nineteen sixties were times of great change. Many people went from moderates to radicals because of the environment around them. That environment was called the establishment. It included all of the events going on in the nineteen sixties. Some of the main events taking place were the Vietnam War, the government, the Democratic National Convention and the culture (*). Many protested things that they did not believe in or thought was wrong (*). There were many things that made the radical's different from the moderates. They were the music they listened to and the clothes they wore. Most obviously was the way they acted. In the summer of 1967, society and r ...
    Related: establishment, foreign policy, military action, rock concert, pants
  • African American Women And Music - 1,702 words
    African American Women and Music The purpose of this report was for me to research and explore the connection between African American women and music. Since prior to the slave decades, music has been an integral part of African American society, and served as a form of social, economic, and emotional support in African American communities in the past and present. This paper will cover three different types of secular music that emerged during the slave days, through the civil war, reconstruction, and depression periods. They are blues, jazz, and gospel music. Each of these forms of music are still in existence today. In addition to exploring the history of each of these genres of music, th ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american jazz, american society, american women, black women
  • Billie Holiday - 545 words
    Billie Holiday Hi, I am Eleanor Fagan Gough, or most of you know me as Lady Day or Billie Holiday. I am known, as one of America's most memorable and influential singers of all time. I was born in Baltimore, in a run down apartment, in 1915. My mother had a very unsteady, low paying job, and my father ran out on us when I was very young. I had no choice but to try and find a way to make money for my mother and I. This led me to become a singer and a well-known legend. I am influential, people say, because I changed the style of jazz music, came from poverty to fame, and overcame a terrible drug addiction in my career. People say I'm influential because I changed the style of jazz music in an ...
    Related: billie, billie holiday, holiday, louis armstrong, carnegie hall
  • Billy Graham - 2,239 words
    ... des of the fifties, if it were in print, it was infallible truth. As a result, not only was communism a force from overseas to fear, it was a force within our own boundaries threatening to tear apart the post war threads that tenuously held the nation together. Billy Graham was not immune to what was going on. When he spoke about communism, he spoke as a person not completely removed from the attitudes that were prevalent in the nation. He, too feared communism. In a message delivered as early as 1947 he stated, Communism is creeping inexorably into these destitute lands, into wartorn China, into restless South America, and unless the Christian religion rescues the nation from the clutch ...
    Related: billy, graham, harry truman, south america, tongue
  • Breakthroughs In American Jazz - 618 words
    Breakthroughs In American Jazz Breakthroughs in American Jazz The backdrop was New Orleans in the late 19th century, a growing port city with a diverse population of African Americans, whites, displaced French settlers, and immigrants from the West Indies and South America. This hodgepodge of cultures mixed European influenced popular music, such as ragtime, with tradition African music creating the hybrid musical style known as jazz. Jazz, bold and beautiful, in its purest sense demands high instrumentation mastery, creativity, and improvisation combined with low rehearsal and repetition. Unlike opera or symphony music, jazz dates back a little more than a century ago and finds all of its m ...
    Related: american, american jazz, american life, american music, free jazz, jazz, jazz music
  • Ch Paul Whiteman A Classically Trained Violinist And Violist Who Adored Jazz But Lacked The Gift To Emulate The Uni - 1,055 words
    Ch.12 Paul Whiteman(1890-1967)= a classically trained violinist and violist who adored jazz but lacked the gift to emulate the uninhibited improvisations of the jazz musicians he admired, formed a dance band in the early twenties that played jazzy arrangements of popular and even classical melodies. Blues = a black vocal folk music, began as vocal (largely instrumental). Classical blues = based on 3 lines of text. Wild wame dont do the blues. Urban Blues = blues pieces written for publication and professional performance. W.C. Handy = father of the blues. Boggie woogie = arrived from blues (a popular piano style with the form and harmony of the blues, but a faster tempo and a dance beat. Jel ...
    Related: gift, jazz, jazz music, orleans jazz, whiteman
  • Duke Ellington - 876 words
    Duke Ellington Duke Ellington was one of the most influential jazz musicians ever. In a time when music was going through a transformation from a ragtime style to a jazz-blues mix, Duke was there to add his own style. He was a composer, conductor, and pianist who revolutionized the way music was written and earned the title of being the great American composer. (Williams, 51) Duke Ellington was born in Washington, D.C. in 1899. At the age of 17 he began to play professionally. Due to his love of music, Duke dropped out of high school to pursue his career as a musician in New York. He arrived in New York in 1923, where Ellington found that his plans were ruined as the job which awaited him wa ...
    Related: duke, duke ellington, ellington, upper class, jazz music
  • Enough Rope By Dorothy Parker - 1,414 words
    Enough Rope By Dorothy Parker DOROTHY PARKER ENOUGH ROPE Nafisa Rebello SYBA ROLL 338 It was Prof. Eunice Dsouza who at the beginning of the year introduced us to the poems of Dorothy Parker. It was just a brief glance, something not from within the syllabus and forgotten the next day. But Resume and War Song would not get out of my head that easily. Intrigued by the woman who famously said Men seldom make passes at girls who wear glasses, I took the first opportunity to find out more about her. Therefore this internal assessment project focuses on Dorothy Parkers first set of published poems, Enough Rope (1926). America of the 1920s Enough Rope was published in December of 1926, and by the ...
    Related: dorothy, dorothy parker, parker, rope, american literature
  • Frank Sinatra - 667 words
    Frank Sinatra The Life and Times of Frank Sinatra By Esme Hawes Chelsea House Publishers Philadelphia 1998 Francis Albert Sinatra was born on December 12, 1915, in Hoboken, New Jersey. He later became known as Frank Sinatra and one of the greatest entertainers of his time. American singers, Bing Crosby and Billie Holiday, influenced Frank. Sinatra then developed a vocal phrasing in his music that influenced generations of popular vocalists. Sinatra anticipated the decline of big-band instrumental jazz music, and helped establish an enthusiastic climate for popular singers. One of the songs Frank Sinatra is most known for singing is the hit "My Way", which my grandfathers favorite son ...
    Related: frank, frank sinatra, american jazz, billie holiday, smile
  • Frock Rock - 508 words
    Frock Rock FROCK ROCK is a Melbourne-based jazz ensemble focusing on original compositions and improvisation. The group promotes a high standard of performance and professionalism gained through the years of experience and learning of its individual members. All of its members have studied music and improvisation at the prestigious Victorian College of the Arts (VCA). Two of the members in FROCK have returned to lecture there, while the remaining members are educators at tertiary and secondary school level around the state of Victoria. The VCA brings together the finest musicians in Australia, both as teachers and students, and is representitive of the ethnic culture in Australia. It is from ...
    Related: rock, american jazz, secondary school, new guinea, victoria
  • Hitler Youth - 1,897 words
    ... if motors and automobiles were of interest, there was the Motor-HJ (the motor or mechanical Youth). The Marine-HJ (navy) and the Waffen-SS (weapons and protection squad) were branches for the more military-oriented youth. Signal, medical, and musical units were also options for the youth. (xviii) HJ calvary unit. Koch p. 164. HJ in river-crossing exercise. Koch p. 164 HJ building model gliders. Koch p. 164 If they did not join one of these detachments, but showed promise in leadership abilities, they could be chosen to join the SS instead of the army. The SS gave them opportunity to use violence and weapons, which they found extremely useful when dealing with Jews or other subhumans. Boy ...
    Related: hitler, hitler youth, basic books, american jazz, jersey
  • Jazz - 691 words
    Jazz As the United States entered the 1920's it was not as unified as one might think. Not one, but two societies existed. The Black society, whose ancestors had been oppressed throughout the ages, and the White society, the oppressors of these men and women. After emancipation the Whites no longer needed the Blacks, but were forced to live with them. The Blacks despised the Whites, but even so they became more like them in every way. Even though these two races had grown so similar over the past century and a half, they were still greatly diversified. One aspect of this great diversity was the difference in music trends. The White society was still in love with the European classical music. ...
    Related: jazz, jazz music, men and women, oxford university press, oppressed
  • John Coltrane - 1,742 words
    John Coltrane A Brief Look Into The Life and Music of JOHN COLTRANE Pg. 1 John Coltrane was born in born in Hamlet, North Carolina on September 23, 1926. John Coltrane was an only child. His father, John was a tailor who played the violin and ukulele, and his mother Alice played piano and sang in the church choir. This was a great environment to foster his love of music. Coltrane soon moved with his family to the town of High Point, where his grandfather was the pastor of the A.M.E. Zion Church. His family was very religious and this instilled in him a deep devotion in religion. At the age of twelve Coltrane's received his first instrument a clarinet which he played for hours on end, that sa ...
    Related: coltrane, father john, john coltrane, atlantic city, religious life
  • Langston Hughes: An Outsiders Voice Of The People - 1,101 words
    Langston Hughes: An Outsider's Voice Of The People Langston Hughes: An Outsider's Voice of the People Langston Hughes is often considered a voice of the African-American people and a prime example of the magnificence of the Harlem Renaissance. His writing does embody these titles, but the concept of Langston Hughes that portrays a black man's rise to poetic greatness from the depths of poverty and repression are largely exaggerated. America frequently confuses the ideas of segregation, suppression, and struggle associated with African-American history and imposes these ideas onto the stories of many black historical figures and artists. While many of them have struggled with these confines s ...
    Related: american people, black people, langston, langston hughes, outsiders
  • Life Of A Pioneer - 1,286 words
    Life of A Pioneer Born in Washington D.C. in 1899, he started piano lessons when he was a boy, by the age of seventeen, he played professionally. In 1923, he moved to New York City where he played in small nightclubs, theaters, and on the radio, later played at one of the most popular nightclubs of the time in Harlem, The Cotton Club. Lead his orchestra for more than fifty years. Duke Ellington unarguably, was one of the greatest jazz composers that had ever lived. Born in Washington D.C. on April 29, 1899, Edward Kennedy Ellingtons (net #6) childhood was unusually happy and carefree for an African American child growing up in the early 1900s (Frankl, 17). Ellington, at first, really wanted ...
    Related: pioneer, edward kennedy, african american, music career, compare
  • Marxist Theory - 2,882 words
    ... oplifting would be legalised, Banks and companies would collapse. A moment's thought shows this is obvious: the legal system has to "fit" the property system, the existing class system. Capitalist law is designed to keep the rich rich and the poor poor. This is recognised in the common sense saying that "there's one law for the rich, another for the poor": of course there is, that's what it's there for! Now, let's think about the political system. Look at any major capitalist country the US, France or Germany. All the government parties in these countries are pro-capitalist parties. The newspaper and TV channels are all owned by big business and churn out capitalist ideas. An idea that d ...
    Related: marxist, marxist theory, human nature, manufacturing industry, manifesto
  • Music Of Early Times - 1,673 words
    Music Of Early Times Early music is based mainly on the music of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras. Many people like to define Early Music as ending in 1750, with the death of J.S. Bach. This is a handy date, but it misses the various stylistic changes taking place around that time, i.e. the emergence of the gallant and pre-classical idioms in close proximity to the final flowering of the baroque proper. To add even more confusion, this is also not clear-cut. As with everything else, Baroque music ended gradually and sporadically, if we are to say that it ended all. Perhaps the significant factor defining these eras as"early music" is that they do not have a continuous performance t ...
    Related: american music, baroque music, classical music, dance music, early music, jazz music, medieval music
  • Music Of The 1920s And 1930s - 374 words
    Music of the 1920s and 1930s Durring the nine-teen twentys and thirties the music scene was as popular as ever. There was the Jazz Era durring the twenties and the Swing Era durring the thirties. Merging into the early twenties a type of improvised music , called Dixieland Jazz was being recorded. Famous artists includeing Louis Armstrong and Kid Ory were very popular to the people. This music was a hit till nine-teen twenty three. Jazz musi was the popular music durring this decade. Than durring the nine-teen thirties many types of music was popular. This decade of the thirties was the Swing Era. Swing is a Jazz style music that emerged at this time. This type of music has a fast paced beat ...
    Related: jazz music, music, popular music, black community, york area
  • On The Road - 1,755 words
    ... in Kerouacs spontaneous prose method as a variation on the stream of consciousness technique favored by the modernists (Jack Kerouac. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 61, 278). With this style, however; comes a lack of the basic components of literature. The plot directly suffered as a result of giving little thought to the writing as he went. Kerouac has written an enormously readable and entertaining book, but one reads it in the same mood that he might visit a slide show (Jack Kerouac. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 61, 278). The book is still fun to read with some natural plot derived from his prose. Champney states, There is built in conflict in Kerouac's writing as he ...
    Related: on the road, beat generation, stream of consciousness, literary criticism, breathing
  • 29 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2