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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: jaundice

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  • The Effects Of Color On Personality And Relationships - 1,051 words
    ... nditioned to gold over a period of time. Gold strengthens all fields of the body and spirit. Black: is a color that is not used very often but it will help bring a patient to a state of grace. It will help them reach the silence and the peace of God. For example, women are more aware of color and prefer red to blue while men prefer blue to red. Elderly people have a significant preference for light colors over darker ones. People with schizophrenia tend to prefer neutral colors such as white, black, brown, and gray. People with bipolar disorder and mentally healthy individuals tend to prefer chromatic hues such as red, yellow, green and blue. Red and yellow aren't the only warm colors; n ...
    Related: human personality, personality, relationships, medical profession, bipolar disorder
  • A Hurt Like No Other - 649 words
    A Hurt Like No Other There are many different things that are repetitively evident throughout Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms. Such things as rain, alcohol, and food are talked about over and over as the novel progresses. At first glance, these reoccurring items have no real meaning, but after further research and complete dissection of the novel, there are hidden meanings behind each one. These meanings may vary from person to person because they are personal opinions, but the items which contain these meanings remain the same. The first of these items which offers more than first thought is the use of rain throughout the novel. In any novel that takes place over a long period of time ...
    Related: turning point, frederick henry, farewell to arms, mortar, rainy
  • A Personal Information - 1,287 words
    A. Personal Information Arthur Kornberg (1918-), American biochemist and physician, claims he has never met "a dull enzyme." He has devoted his life to pursuing and purifying these critical protein molecules. His love of science did not spring from a family history rooted in science. He was born on March 3rd, 1918, the son of a sewing machine operator in the sweatshops of the Lower East Side of New York City. His parents, Joseph Aaron Kornberg and Lena Rachel Katz, were immigrant Jews who made great sacrifices to ensure the safety of their family. They had fled Poland, for if they had stayed, they would have been murdered in a German concentration camp. His grandfather had abandoned the pate ...
    Related: personal information, national institute, york city, lincoln high school, spending
  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,099 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic steroids (steroids for short) are used widely among bodybuilders to increase their testosterone, thus to get stacked or larger. Steroids seem to be a wonderful thing for these bodybuilders, but very few of them know just how they work and what the effects are. History The word "anabolic" portrays any substance, which accumulates nitrogen in muscle protein and from there builds muscle tissue. The bodys natural anabolic steroid is called testosterone, which men (naturally) obtain more of, than women do. Testosterone brings on the development of speed, mass, endurance, definition, and strength. Testosterone is naturally released into the blood stream, goes to differen ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, protein synthesis
  • Anemia - 398 words
    Anemia What is Anemia? Anemia is a deficiency of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the blood. The word anemia comes from two Greek roots, together meaning without blood. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, anemia referred to the pallor of the skin and mucous membranes. After medical science advanced, blood cell counts could be done. Anemia became the disease we know today. Symptoms of Anemia Mild anemia may have no outer symptoms. Weakness, fatigue, and pallor are very common symptom. Symptoms of severe anemia are shortness of breath, rapid heartbeat, lightheadedness, headache, ringing in the ears, irritability, restless leg syndrome, mental confusion, dizziness, fainting, and dimmed ...
    Related: anemia, cell anemia, iron deficiency anemia, bone marrow, family history
  • Biological Viruses: All Time Enemies - 1,132 words
    ... a rash of fluid-filled blisters that begin as red spots covering most of the body and the inside of the mouth. The disease is dangerous to newborns, to people first infected in adulthood, and to those in whom the virus remains dormant in nerve cells, erupting as the more painful and sometimes chronic zoster (shingles) later in life. VZV is a member of the Herpes virus family, which also includes the causative agents of infectious mononucleosis, roseola, and oral and genital herpes (Microsoft Encarta 96 Encyclopedia). An extremely contagious viral disease, chiefly of children, characterized by early fever, an eruption of papules and vesicles, and mild constitutional disturbances. In most ...
    Related: biological, hepatitis b, drinking water, microsoft corporation, tube
  • Catch 22 And Good As Gold Satire - 1,277 words
    Catch 22 and Good as Gold - Satire Joseph Heller who is perhaps one of the most famous writers of the 20th century writes on some emotional issues such as war. He does not deal with these issues in the normal fashion instead he criticizes them and the institutions that help carry these things out. Heller in fact goes beyond criticizing he satirizes. Throughout his two major novels Catch-22 and Good as Gold he satirizes almost all of Americas respectful institutions. To truly understand these novels you must recognize that they are satires and why they are. Catch-22 is a satire on World War II. This novel takes place on the small island of Pianosa in the Mediterranean sea late in the war when ...
    Related: catch, catch 22, satire, mediterranean sea, human life
  • Circulatory System - 1,289 words
    ... her factors include abnormalities in the proteins that regulate blood cell production and a malfunctioning immune system that interferes with the normal blood cell production. Certain environmental factors have been associated with the development of plastic anemia. Chemotherapy drugs such as busulfan or antibiotics such as chloraphenicol can cause temporary or prolonged plastic anemia. Chemicals such as benzene and pesticides, infections such as viral hepatitis and mononucleosis, autoimmune disorders and ionizing radiation also has been linked to the development of plastic anemia. Although exposure to these agents increases the risk of developing plastic anemia, it is proven that they a ...
    Related: circulatory, circulatory system, immune system, viral hepatitis, good health
  • Clinical Chemistry In Medicine - 1,442 words
    Clinical Chemistry In Medicine Of the diagnostic methods available to veterinarians, the clinical chemistry test has developed into a valuable aid for localizing pathologic conditions. This test is actually a collection of specially selected individual tests. With just a small amount of whole blood or serum, many body systems can be analyzed. Some of the more common screenings give information about the function of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas and about muscle and bone disease. There are many blood chemistry tests available to doctors. This paper covers the some of the more common tests. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) is an end-product of protein metabolism. Like most of the other molecules i ...
    Related: chemistry, clinical, medicine, energy source, liver disease
  • College Enivornment - 1,440 words
    ... azines. Looking fat is not always the cause of an eating disorder as seen in Daniel John's case. Eating disorders can come as a result of stress or a desire to control something in one's life or a desire to look thinner. Most college campuses offer help with eating disorders. It is such a common occurrence among college age persons that there are support groups and treatment centers all over the country on and off campus. At Gannet Health Services of Cornell University there are physicians that can provide the needed medical care, counseling and psychological services, nutritionists, and a nutrition clinic that provides specialized treatment for eating disorders. Personal hygiene can als ...
    Related: college campuses, college life, college students, drugs and alcohol, anorexia nervosa
  • Diabetes And Pregnancy - 884 words
    Diabetes And Pregnancy Deciding to have a child is one of the most important decisions of peoples lives. Diabetes is a very serious disease. It attacks million people around the world many of them women. These women one day may be thinking about having a baby. Numerous precautions must be taken by women during pregnancy. Special safeguard must be taken by women with diabetes. These precautions need to be taken due to birth defects. "An estimated 1.5 million women of child-bearing age in the United States have diabetes. A diabetic pregnancy is one of the leading causes of birth defects." (Henderson pNA) Diabetes can strike at any age and can occur in anyone. Although it is not exactly known f ...
    Related: dependent diabetes, diabetes, diabetes mellitus, diabetes type, pregnancy
  • Dothiepin Vs Fluoxetine Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics - 1,290 words
    Dothiepin Vs. Fluoxetine (Mechanism Of Action And Pharmacodynamics) Comparison Between Mechanism of Action and Pharmacodynamics of Dothiepin and Fluoxetine Description of medicines Mechanism of action and pharmacodynamics Dothiepin Dothiepin is a tricyclic antidepressant. It acts by promoting the effectiveness of several amines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which is also known as 5HT and serotonin). It functions by inhibiting their reuptake at the terminals of nerve cells, thus leading to their prolonged presence at the synaptic cleft and an increased effect on the neuron.(1) The reuptake pumps for the above amines are responsible for reducing the concentration of these ...
    Related: mechanism, gastrointestinal tract, heart disease, new zealand, linear
  • Ernest Hemingway The Man And His Work - 1,238 words
    Ernest Hemingway - The Man And His Work Ernest Hemingway - The Man and His Work On July 2, 1961, a writer whom many critics call the greatest writer of this century, a man who had a zest for adventure, a winner of the Nobel Prize and the Pulitzer Prize, a man who held esteem everywhere - on that July day, that man put a shotgun to his head and killed himself. That man was Ernest Hemingway. Though he chose to end his life, his heart and soul lives on through his many books and short stories. Hemingway's work is his voice on how he viewed society, specifically American society and the values it held. No other author of this century has had such a general and lasting influence on the generation ...
    Related: ernest, ernest hemingway, hemingway, american life, francis macomber
  • Healthcare - 1,142 words
    Healthcare In today's fast-paced world where technology rules, the medical profession is also advancing. In 1991, 2,900 liver transplants were performed in the United States while there were 30,000 canidates for the procedure in the United States alone (Heffron, T. G., 1993). Due to shortages of available organs for donation/transplantation, specifically livers, once again science has come to the rescue. Although the procedure is fairly new in the United States, the concept of living organ donation is fast growing. Living related liver transplantion was first proposed as a theoretical entity in 1969 but it was not until almost twenty years later that the procedure became a clinical reality ( ...
    Related: healthcare, liver disease, medical profession, important role, holistic
  • Hepatitis - 1,662 words
    Hepatitis Hepatitis In modern society when a person gets sick with the flu or a cold they will usually go about their normal routine with the exception of a sneeze or a cough throughout the day. Sometimes things can be more than what they appear to be. The symptoms start out like the flu with coughing, fever, aches, and vomiting. However, the disease gradually worsens with symptoms of extreme weakness and excruciating abdominal pain. By then it is usually too late when the person finds out that their liver is failing and that there disease is caused by one of the most contagious, dangerous and deadliest of viruses. These viruses that were initially concealed by flu like symptoms are now know ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis a, hepatitis b, hepatitis c, viral hepatitis
  • Hepatitis - 1,730 words
    Hepatitis Hepatitis In modern society when a person gets sick with the flu or a cold they will usually go about their normal routine with the exception of a sneeze or a cough throughout the day. Sometimes things can be more than what they appear to be. The symptoms start out like the flu with coughing, fever, aches, and vomiting. However, the disease gradually worsens with symptoms of extreme weakness and excruciating abdominal pain. By then it is usually too late when the person finds out that their liver is failing and that there disease is caused by one of the most contagious, dangerous and deadliest of viruses. These viruses that were initially concealed by flu like symptoms are now know ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis a, hepatitis b, hepatitis c, viral hepatitis
  • Hepatitis A - 1,052 words
    Hepatitis A title = Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Introduction: Hepatitis is caused by a virus that is targeted at the liver, one of your most important organs!! Specifically, it causes inflammation and injury to the liver. Hepatitis comes in many different forms, five to be exact. There is Hepatitis A, B, C, D & E. Hepatitis is caused mainly by viruses, all of which are set on shutting down your liver. I will be specifically concentrating on Hepatitis A in this report. Hepatitis A is also known as infectious Hepatitis, an extremely contagious viral infection that often effects young children and young adults, especially those in large groups. It has been known to break out in schools, summer camp ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis a, viral hepatitis, young children, personal hygiene
  • Hepatitis B - 651 words
    Hepatitis B Hepatitis B can be prevented with a highly effective vaccine, but this year ten to thirty million people will become infected with the hepatitis B virus. I feel that because this disease is preventable, only knowledge can help reduce the number of people infected. Hepatitis B is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus. This virus is a blood-borne pathogen. It is one hundred times more infectious than HIV. Hepatitis B is one of the most frequently reported vaccine preventable diseases in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This disease is transmitted through oral, vaginal, and anal sex. You can also acquire the disease through sharing n ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis b, medical treatment, liver disease, carrier
  • Hepatitis B Can Be Prevented With A Highly Effective Vaccine, But This Year - 649 words
    Hepatitis B can be prevented with a highly effective vaccine, but this year ten to thirty million people will become infected with the hepatitis B virus. I feel that because this disease is preventable, only knowledge can help reduce the number of people infected. Hepatitis B is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus. This virus is a blood-borne pathogen. It is one hundred times more infectious than HIV. "Hepatitis B is one of the most frequently reported vaccine preventable diseases in the United States," according to the Centers for Disease Control. This disease is transmitted through oral, vaginal, and anal sex. You can also acquire the disease through sharing needles, to ...
    Related: hepatitis, hepatitis b, highly effective, south america, disease control
  • Is The Gulf War Syndrome Real - 1,034 words
    Is The Gulf War Syndrome Real? Is the Gulf War Syndrome Real? On August 2, 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait. The United States government acted very quickly. Ships were dispatched to the Persian Gulf, and oil prices shot up as and oil embargo was placed against Iraq. The U.S. government told us that Saddam Hussein was poised to invade the neighboring countries, including Saudi Arabia, and the worlds oil supply was threatened. George Bush launched operation Desert Shield in which a coalition of many nation's armies gathered in the deserts of Saudi Arabia bordering Iraq and Kuwait. As the war began, the coalition of national armies assembled in Saudi Arabia took a few SCUD missile shots fired from Ir ...
    Related: gulf, gulf war, persian gulf, syndrome, u.s. government
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