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  • Call Of The Wild By Jack London 1876 1916 - 1,843 words
    Call of the Wild by Jack London (1876 - 1916) Call of the Wild by Jack London (1876 - 1916) Type of Work: Adventure novel Setting Northland (Alaska); the goldrush of the 1890s Principal Characters Buck, a large, intelligent and well-bred dog Spitz, a cruel lead sled dog John Thornton, Buck's Northiand master Story Overveiw Buck, a huge four-year-old Scottish Shepherd-Saint Bernard cross-breed, lived a life of ease at Judge Miller's Santa Clara Valley estate. As the judge's loyal companion, working with his sons, and guarding his grandchildren, Buck ruled over all things - humans included. Combining his mother's intelligence with the size and strength of his father, Buck became the undisputed ...
    Related: call of the wild, jack, jack london, london, the call of the wild
  • Jack London - 1,059 words
    Jack London One is led to believe that if a person is an author, then that person would have the best education that is available to them. However, this is not the case for Jack London. He dropped out of school at the age of fourteen and explored San Francisco, stole oysters, worked for the government, went to Japan, and traveled around the United States by hitching rides on freight trains. This is just a list of the few things he did during the five-year period while he did not attend school. He then returned and finished high school at the age of nineteen to continue onto the University of California at Berkeley, only to quit after one semester. Yet, he is described by Howard Lacchtman, as ...
    Related: jack, jack london, london, call of the wild, kidney disease
  • Jack London - 688 words
    Jack London Jack London (1876-1916) was easily the most successful and best-known writer in America in the first decade of the 20th century. He is best known for his books, The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and The Sea-Wolf, and a few short stories, such as "To Build a Fire" and "The White Silence." He was a productive writer whose fiction traveled through three lands and their cultures such as the Yukon, California, and the South Pacific. His most famous writings included war, boxing stories, and the life of the Molokai lepers. "He was among the most influential people of his day, who understood how to use the media to market his self-created image of a once poor boy to now famous writer"(b ...
    Related: jack, jack london, london, search results, white fang
  • The Winter Wonderland In Jack London's To Build A Fire - 579 words
    The Winter Wonderland In Jack London'S To Build A Fire No matter what type of story you are reading, setting always plays a key element in producing the desired effect. Jack London's short story To Build A Fire provides an excellent example of this. In this story, a man hikes across a snow and ice covered plane towards the encampment where he is supposed to meet up with more travelers like himself. The setting of this story is one of the northernmost most areas of the earth, the Yukon. The man must hike across this area for approximately thirty-six miles before he reaches the camp at which he is expected. The constantly dropping temperature further complicates the man's hike. When he begins ...
    Related: jack, jack london, to build a fire, winter, wonderland
  • To Build A Fire By Jack London - 628 words
    To Build A Fire By Jack London In To Build a Fire, Jack London uses many details of setting to illustrate the gravity of the protagonists situation. The story is a detailed description of the dangers of intense cold and the stages involved in the process of freezing to death. The man in to build a fire is a very dogmatic and arrogant person who believed in his own abilities and took everything at face value. He didnt analyze and scrutinize over every detail. He definitely wasnt one to philosophize and his conceptions were rooted in the tangible not the surreal. At the end, though, he realizes his own deficiencies and finally dies. The magnitude of the mans situation is fully illustrated and ...
    Related: jack, jack london, london, to build a fire, detailed description
  • A Study Of Jack Londons Belief In Darwinism - 614 words
    A Study of Jack Londons Belief in Darwinism Jack London has a strong belief in Darwinism, survival of the fittest, during the late 1800s through the early 1900s, when he wrote. Throughout his writings, many characters display Londons belief in Darwinism. In the novel, The Call of the Wild, Jack Londons belief in the Darwinian Jungle is portrayed by animals interacting with humans, each other, and the environment. This can be shown through Buck, a house dog turned sled dog, interacting with his masters, other dogs, and the Yukon wilderness. As Buck travels from master to master throughout the course of the novel he learns, through trial and error, what behavior brings rewards, and that which ...
    Related: darwinism, jack, jack london, after life, late 1800s
  • Adventurism In Human Nature - 843 words
    Adventurism In Human Nature Human history is littered with example where a few individual risked life and limbs to venture into the unknown, which then came to be discovered, thanks to their spirit of adventurism or as some would say, fool hardy bravado. Of course, certain names come to mind, Christopher Columbus, Captain James Cook, Lois and Clark etc. There is another side to this tale of fame as well. Even the success stories sometimes had a ring of failure about itself. A person might be a pioneer in the field of discovery but the fruits of his labor are enjoyed by those who follow him. He might in fact have served as an expendable instrument in the road to discovery, in the big schemes ...
    Related: human history, human nature, human spirit, to build a fire, captain james cook
  • Assessment Of Into The Wild - 841 words
    Assessment Of Into The Wild Although precisely on target in his assessment of Chris McCandless being in touch with the bare-bones essence of nature, Gordon Young's preceding description of Chris should be rephrased: A profoundly Un-American figure, uncompromising in his approach and thoroughly optimistic about the future. For Chris McCandless did not set out to show or prove his American character. Neither does he approve or want to exemplify a true modern American character, because true American character does not seek solitude, preferring the saddle to the streetcar, or the star-sprinkled sky to a roof, or, especially, the obscure and difficult trail, leading into the unknown, to any pave ...
    Related: assessment, modern american, different ways, huck finn, charity
  • Call Of The Wild - 1,175 words
    Call Of The Wild The main character of the novel, The Call of the Wild, is a St. Bernard and Scotch Shepherd mix, named Buck. As I read the book, I found out that Buck can be very loyal and trustworthy to his master, if his master is loyal to him. Also, at times I found that Buck could turn into an enraged beast very easily. At home, which was a large house called Judge Miller's Place, in the sun kissed Santa Clara Valley in California, Buck ruled over all of the dogs that were there. Buck was Judge Miller's inseparable companion, until a man named Manuel, who was one the gardener's helpers, committed a treacherous act. In order to cover his Chinese lottery gambling debts, he stole Buck from ...
    Related: call of the wild, the call of the wild, santa clara, management skills, bloody
  • Call Of The Wild - 402 words
    Call Of The Wild Call of the Wild Jack London's thrilling epic tale of adventure and bravery, through the eyes of a part St. Bernard, part German Shepherd named Buck. Our story opens with the author describing the lifestyle of this pampered dog on the premises of his master's home, Judge Miller, in the Santa Clara valley. John London describes a particular gold rush that transpired in 1897 and it was named the Klondike gold rush. Very early in the story line, Buck is kidnapped by Manuel, one of the gardener's helpers, who's major weakness was gambling. Buck was sold to two men named Francois and Perrault. Buck was shipped to Alaska to serve as a sled dog during the Klondike gold rush. One of ...
    Related: call of the wild, the call of the wild, gold rush, german shepherd, ancestry
  • Conflicts In To Build A Fire, The Use Of Force, And A P - 517 words
    Conflicts In - To Build A Fire, The Use Of Force, And A & P Conflicts In the three stories To Build a Fire, The Use of Force, and A and P there are some different conflicts. A conflict is struggle between two or more objects. In these stories the three different conflicts are man versus nature, man versus man, and man versus self. The three stories that contain these conflicts are To Build a Fire by Jack London, The Use of Force by Williams Carlos Williams, and A and P by John Updike. The first story to talk about is To Build a Fire, then The Use of Force, and lastly A and P. The story To Build a Fire by London has one of the most unpredictable conflicts in it. The conflict in this story is ...
    Related: to build a fire, the girl, jack london, use of force, updike
  • How To Write A Fictional Story - 231 words
    How To Write A Fictional Story One of the best ways for writers to create a story line is to base it upon real life occurrences. Mark Twain worked on a riverboat. Jack London explored Alaska. Hemmingway was an avid fisherman and loved to travel. Their experiences allowed them to create settings and characters that seem real. A good way for a writer to fictionalize their life is to combine various experiences together. Use things that happen to a friend, and add those experiences to your own. They may be things a writer has witnessed, or things a friend tells them about in detail. You can use the experiences to create a completely different story about your character. The same idea works in c ...
    Related: fictional, jack london, creative writing, real life, creative
  • Imagery - 2,396 words
    IMAGERY The term imagery has various applications. Generally, imagery includes all kinds of sense perception (not just visual pictures). In a more limited application, the term describes visible objects only. But the term is perhaps most commonly used to describe figurative language, which is as a theme in literature. An example is animal imagery in Othello When Iago tortures Othello with animal images of his wife's supposed infidelity, "were they as prime as goats, as hot as monkeys" (3.3.403), his description so overcomes the Moor that later, in greeting Lodovico, he suddenly blurts out, "Goats and monkeys!" (4.1.256). SIMILE A direct, expressed comparison between two things essentially un ...
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  • Law - 1,242 words
    Law Of Life By Koshoosh Death is an end result of any living creature in Nature. As an intelligent species it is sometimes difficult, especially when personally facing death, to accept this brutal reality. Koshoosh, in "The Law of Life" written by Jack London, experiences the intelligible acceptance of the "law of...flesh"(890). He is found being left alone by his tribe "in the snow, with a little pile of wood."(891) When he starts his reflective meditation on people and events he has observed throughout his life, he tries to understand the reason for his death. Although the body may be old and unable to defend itself physically, there is a conscious desire to live on. Therefore an individua ...
    Related: facing death, jack london, viewing, goodbye
  • Londons Stories - 1,903 words
    London`s Stories Three of Jack London's most famous stories were The Call of the Wild , White Fang and To Build a Fire. Though they are completely unrelated stories they have many similarities unfolded were also similar. Both animals started their lives out in a very normal fashion but then they were brought into a different environment and forced to change. In To Build a Fire the man is the one being forced to change, without success. The introduction of characters was also similar the way they were led through life not knowing what there purpose was until they met their final character and then figured out what they had to do. Three of Jack London's most famous stories were The Call of the ...
    Related: best short stories, jack london, sulphur creek, indian camp, beast
  • On The Road - 1,755 words
    ... in Kerouacs spontaneous prose method as a variation on the stream of consciousness technique favored by the modernists (Jack Kerouac. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 61, 278). With this style, however; comes a lack of the basic components of literature. The plot directly suffered as a result of giving little thought to the writing as he went. Kerouac has written an enormously readable and entertaining book, but one reads it in the same mood that he might visit a slide show (Jack Kerouac. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 61, 278). The book is still fun to read with some natural plot derived from his prose. Champney states, There is built in conflict in Kerouac's writing as he ...
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  • On Thursday Afternoon, I Went To Huntington Library With Thao And Jane When We Arrived At The Library We Found That There Was - 1,010 words
    On Thursday afternoon, I went to Huntington Library with Thao and Jane. When we arrived at the library we found that there was exhibits on Jack London and George Washington. We bought the entry ticket, which was green, and went into the library. We started in the first exhibit on our right hand side. It was the exhibit on Jack London and George Washington. We started with Jack London first. Jack London was a famous writer as well as a adventurer. Throughout his life time, he had spent his short forty years writing fifty books, which would consist of novels, short story collections and notification works. He wrote the books wtih the adventure experiences that he had went through. He's most fa ...
    Related: huntington, jane, library, thursday, gold rush
  • Significance Of Words Dying And Death In To Build A Fire - 600 words
    Significance of Words Dying and Death in "To Build a Fire" Modern Lit. Paper Significance of Words Dying and Death in "To Build a Fire" Dying and Death in "To Build a Fire" The significance of the words "dying and death" in Jack London's 1910 novel, "To Build a Fire" continuously expresses the man's dwindling warmth and bad luck in his journey along the Yukon trail to meet "the boys" at camp. London associates dying with the man's diminishing ability to stay warm in the frigid Alaskan climate. The main characters predicament slowly worsens one level at a time finally resulting in death. The narrator informs the reader "the man" lacks personal experience travelling in the Yukon terrain. The o ...
    Related: significance, to build a fire, personal experience, main character, warm
  • Significance Of Words Dying And Death In To Build A Fire Dying And Death In To Build A Fire - 608 words
    Significance of Words Dying and Death in To Build a Fire Dying and Death in To Build a Fire Modern Lit. Paper Significance of Words Dying and Death in "To Build a Fire" Dying and Death in "To Build a Fire" The significance of the words "dying and death" in Jack London's 1910 novel, "To Build a Fire" continuously expresses the man's dwindling warmth and bad luck in his journey along the Yukon trail to meet "the boys" at camp. London associates dying with the man's diminishing ability to stay warm in the frigid Alaskan climate. The main characters predicament slowly worsens one level at a time finally resulting in death. The narrator informs the reader "the man" lacks personal experience trave ...
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  • The Call Of The Wild - 622 words
    The Call of the Wild Dear Jake, I will be glad to tell you about a really great book I read lately. It is called Call of the Wild, by Jack London. It has 104 pages and is a fiction book. The Call of the Wild has a very interesting plot. It is centered around a St. Bernard and Scotch Shepard mix, named Buck. At home, which was a large house called Judge Millers Place, in the sun kissed Sanata Clara Valley, he ruled over all dogs. Buck was Judge Miller's inseperable companion, until a man named Manuel, who was the one of the gardener's helpers, commited a treacherous act. Manuel, to cover his Chinese lottery gambling debts, stole Buck from his sound sleep and brought him to a flag station call ...
    Related: call of the wild, the call of the wild, john thornton, management skills, gardener
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