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  • Jack Kerouac - 1,303 words
    Jack Kerouac Jack Kerouac was a poet who focused on the forgotten people of the world. Wherever he traveled he found the places nobody wanted to find and turned the un-pretty into magnificent poetry. Kerouac used the people no one wanted to remember and turned them into poetic works of art. Jack Kerouacs life was filled with adventure and self-destruction. Born on March 12, 1922, Kerouac grew up in the poor city of Lowell, Massachusetts. His life was tormented with poverty and alcoholism, first by his father, then he himself was afflicted by the deadly disease. At the age of 8, Kerouac lost his brother, Gerard to typhoid fever. Kerouac traveled hitchhike style across the country. In 1943, Ke ...
    Related: jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, football team, columbia university
  • Jack Kerouac And The Beat Movement - 1,084 words
    Jack Kerouac And The Beat Movement World War II marked a wide dividing line between the old and the new in American society and the nations literature(The World Book Encyclopedia 427) . When world War II ended there was a pent up desire that had been postponed due to the war. Post war America brought about a time when it seemed that every young man was doing the same thing, getting a job, settling down and starting a family. America was becoming a nation of consumers. One group that was against conforming to this dull American lifestyle was referred to as Beatniks. The Beats or Beatniks condemned middle class American life as morally bankrupt. They praised individualism as the highest human ...
    Related: beat, jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, american society
  • On The Road By Jack Kerouac - 854 words
    On The Road By Jack Kerouac On the Road, by Jack Kerouac was considered to be the first "beat" novel. The lifestyle of beats is explained as going against mainstream norms. The two main characters in the novel Dean and Sal both go against normal society. On the Road was written during a time when mainstream society was in to materialistic possessions. The average person was concerned with having a good paying job and raising a family in the suburbs. Beatniks had the complete opposite goals in life then the average person. Beats wanted to be different and not be tied down to a signal job for the rest of their lives. They believed that mainstream society were slaves to the system. Dean and Sal ...
    Related: jack, jack kerouac, kerouac, on the road, west coast
  • Allen Ginsbergs Poetry - 1,698 words
    Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Themes and Values of the Beat Generation As Expressed in Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Perhaps one of the most well known authors of the Beat Generation is a man we call Allen Ginsberg, who expresses the themes and values in his poetry. He was, in fact, the first Beat Writer to gain popular notice when he delivered a performance of his now famous poem, Howl, in October of 1955. The Beat Generation is typically described as a vision, not an idea and being hard to define. It is characterized as a cultural revolution in process, made by a post-World War II generation of disaffiliated young people...without spiritual values they could honor (Char ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, poetry, post world, vietnam war
  • Andy Warhols Impact On Art - 1,584 words
    ... ly he got out of the subways and started showing his work. Also like Basquait, there are certain things that remain prevalent in all of his work. For example, the radiant baby and barking dog are repeated and perfected. Keith Haring's style, like so many others from the Pop era, has been copied over and over. The most recent duplication was perhaps by the automobile conglomerate Honda for a commercial promoting one of their vehicles. Regardless, Keith Haring had a uniqueness and productivity that eventually became planted in the world psyche. Another artist that frequented the Factory was Kenny Scharf. Kenny Scharf was also briefly a graffiti artist. He, however, grew tired of this and m ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, on the road, jack kerouac, cloth
  • Buddhism In America - 1,475 words
    Buddhism In America The stresses and intensity of modern American society have influenced many people to adopt and adapt the principles of Buddhism and other Eastern religions. Some recent statistics from the US department of Health and Human Services show that 75% of the General Population experiences at least "some stress" every two weeks (National Health Interview Survey). Half of those experience moderate or high levels of stress during the same two-week period. It is common knowledge that stress can lead to heart disease, high blood pressure, strokes, and other illnesses in many individuals. Stress also contributes to the development of alcoholism, obesity, suicide, drug addiction, ciga ...
    Related: america, buddhism, jack kerouac, human evolution, freely
  • Buddhism In America - 1,504 words
    ... themes appeal to many, Buddhist belief in using the mind to change our lives provides practical methods and exercises that we can use every day to change our perception of reality. "Rather than turning us away from what is best in Western Culture, Buddhism can help us return to it, for the west today is in the grip of a major cultural crisis of confidence."(Kulananda, 210) Buddhism has become so popular in the West, because it teaches one how to be happier and more aware by use of; seeing things as they are, living a sacred life, speaking the truth, loving, attention and focus on what is important to you, and meditation. These concepts work with us, because they are easily adaptable and ...
    Related: america, buddhism, people search, world today, lifestyle
  • Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg - 1,256 words
    Howl And Kaddish By Allen Ginsberg As you read the first lines of "Howl" and "Kaddish", the overall tone of the poem hits you right in the face. Allen Ginsberg, the poet, presents these two poems as complaints and injustices. He justifies these complaints in the pages that follow. Ginsberg also uses several literary techniques in these works to enhance the images for the reader. His own life experiences are mentioned in the poems, the majority of his works being somewhat biographical. It is said that Allen Ginsberg was ahead of his time, but in fact he was just riding the wave of a literature revolution. The decade of the 1950s was a time of change. America and the world was experiencing a t ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, ginsberg, howl, staten island
  • Jim Morrison - 1,723 words
    Jim Morrison " The Doors. There's the known. And there's the unknown. And what separates the two is the door, and that's what I want to be. Ahh wanna be th' door. . ." - Jim Morrison Jim Morrison is often thought of as a drunk musician. He is also portrayed to many as an addict and another 'doped up' rock star. These negative opinions project a large shadow on the many positive aspects of this great poet. Jim's music was influenced heavily by many famous authors. You must cast aside your ignorance and look behind the loud electric haze of the sixties music. You must wipe your eyes and look through the psychedelic world of LSD. Standing behind these minor flaws, you will see a young and very ...
    Related: morrison, alexander the great, coca cola, rolling stone, ucla
  • Joe Smith - 1,336 words
    Joe Smith Ms. Johnson Period 4 22 May 2000 Suicide Lurks Over the Horizon Many people say that Ernest Hemingways stature within the view of the public has only increased since his death, proving that his work has endured the test of time. In many minds of Americans who are familiar with Hemingway, he was a man of contrast and contradictions. Simply put, Americans have this theory of Hemingway because he stood for rugged individualism through his manly, brutish nature yet he committed suicide. However, in all honesty this notion is false. At first, agreeance with the majority was easy because it seemed logical but after reanalyzing Hemingways works, its definitive that Hemingway conversed wit ...
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  • On The Road - 1,765 words
    On The Road Jack Kerouac: On the Road Jack Kerouac is the first to explore the world of the wandering hoboes in his novel, On the Road. He created a world that shows the lives and motivations of this culture he himself named the Beats. Kerouac saw the beats as people who rebel against everything accepted to gain freedom and expression. Although he has been highly criticized for his lack of writing skills, he made a novel that is both realistic and enjoyable to read. He has a complete disregard for developed of plot or characters, yet his descriptions are incredible. Kerouacs novel On the Road defined the post World War II generation known as the beats. The motivation behind the beat movement ...
    Related: on the road, social aspects, men and women, middle class, criticism
  • On The Road - 1,755 words
    ... in Kerouacs spontaneous prose method as a variation on the stream of consciousness technique favored by the modernists (Jack Kerouac. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 61, 278). With this style, however; comes a lack of the basic components of literature. The plot directly suffered as a result of giving little thought to the writing as he went. Kerouac has written an enormously readable and entertaining book, but one reads it in the same mood that he might visit a slide show (Jack Kerouac. Contemporary Literary Criticism, Vol. 61, 278). The book is still fun to read with some natural plot derived from his prose. Champney states, There is built in conflict in Kerouac's writing as he ...
    Related: on the road, beat generation, stream of consciousness, literary criticism, breathing
  • Rebel Poets Of 1950s - 1,826 words
    Rebel Poets Of 1950S Rebel Poets of the 1950s America demands a poetry that is bold, modern and all-surrounding and kosmical, as she is herself. Although Walt Whitman wrote that prescription shortly after the Civil War, it also vividly describes the generation of American poets who came of age after World War II. Particularly during moments of cultural change, poets have joined artists on the front lines of expanding consciousness by forging a vernacular language that gives expression to contemporary life. One such shift in poetry occurred at the time of World War I, and another major shift took place during the decade after the Second World War. The 1950s are stereotypically represented as ...
    Related: american poets, poets, rebel, urban life, natural environment
  • Rimbaud And Ginsberg - 866 words
    Rimbaud And Ginsberg Rimbaud and Ginsberg as Modern Poets Anyone who has read a fair sampling of modernist poetry or studied some representative visionary poets has found the experience something of a revelation. Immediately exhilarating for some, initially intimidating for others and, for all of us, a profound departure from traditional literature. According to Rimbaud, for a poet to be absolutely modern he must become a visionary and a poet makes himself a visionary through a long, boundless and systematized disorganization of all the senses. All forms of love, of suffering, of madness, he searches himself, he exhausts within himself all poisons and preserves their quintessences. Rimbauds ...
    Related: allen ginsberg, ginsberg, rimbaud, school library, high school
  • The Role Ofreligion And Morality In Cats Cradle - 1,149 words
    The Role Ofreligion And Morality In Cat's Cradle As an author, Kurt Vonnegut has received just about every kind of praise an author can receive: his works held the same sway over American philosophy as did those of Jack Kerouac or J.R.R. Tolkein; his writing has received acclaim from academics and the masses alike; and three of his books have been made into feature films. Society has permanently and noticeably been altered by his writing. Through accessible language and easily-understood themes, Vonnegut has created works subtle, engrossing, and familiar. His main method for doing this is by exploiting a theme with which everyone is familiar and about which everyone has his own opinion: reli ...
    Related: cats, cradle, morality, kurt vonnegut, academic success
  • Zen Buddhism - 1,327 words
    Zen Buddhism Buddhism's trek through history, politics, and America Zen, or Zenno (as it is known by the Japanese word from which it derives), is the most common form of Buddhism practiced in the world today. All types of people from intellectuals to celebrities refer to themselves as Buddhist, but despite its popularity today in America, it has had a long history throughout the world. "Here none think of wealth or fame, All talk of right and wrong is quelled. In Autumn I rake the leaf-banked stream, In spring attend the nightingale. Who dares approach the lion's Mountain cave? Cold, robust, A Zen-person through and through, I let the spring breeze enter at the gate." -Daigu (1584-1669, Rinz ...
    Related: buddhism, zen buddhism, south vietnam, long history, neutrality
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