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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: j edgar hoover

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  • J Edgar Hoover - 1,411 words
    J. Edgar Hoover For nearly half a century J. Edgar Hoover was one of the most powerful officials in the Federal government of the United States. As head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation from 1924 until his death in 1972, he was the nations chief law enforcement officer. His intimate knowledge of politicians and government operations made him a man to be feared by elected officials, and none of the eight presidents under whom he served dared fire him. J.Edgar Hoover was born on January 1, 1895, in Washington D.C. He attended George Washington University and earned a degree in 1917. In 1919 he became assistant to Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer in the Department of Justice. It was Pa ...
    Related: edgar, hoover, j edgar hoover, post world, department of justice
  • Alcatraz Island And Prison - 1,993 words
    Alcatraz Island And Prison Alcatraz Island has quite a distinct history. Many people know that Alcatraz served as a federal prison, but most are reluctant to know that this island served as fort. Built before the Civil War, it served two main purposes. First, that it was to guard the San Francisco bay area from enemy ships against a foreign invasion, and second, to hold hostage prisoners of war or POW's as they were called. In this report, I'll show you how this fortress came to be a federal prison, why it is no longer in operation today, and most importantly, to show why it was built in the first place. When the great Gold Rush of 1849 first started, California grew from what would be consi ...
    Related: alcatraz, federal prison, military prison, prison population, state prison
  • Alcatraz Island And Prison - 2,035 words
    ... rcumvented the San Francisco citizens who were concerned at the prospect of vicious criminals in the near vicinity, the Bureau of Prisons set about selecting a warden who could do the job. A well-organized, no-nonsense businessman and prison administrator with twelve years of experience in the California Department of Corrections, James A. Johnston was to be that man. Johnston had retired at the time of his appointment by the Department of Justice, and its acceptance resulted in his serving as warden of Alcatraz for the next fourteen years. Classified as a concentration model, where difficult-to-manage prisoners from other institutions would be concentrated under one roof, Alcatraz serve ...
    Related: alcatraz, federal prison, prison officials, prison system, good idea
  • Assassination Of Jfk - 1,679 words
    ... ove Hunt was the third tramp, but it is worth noting that he bears a strong resemblance to a man who was arrested in Dealey Plaza shortly after the assassination. The Mafia had the means, the motive, and the opportunity to assassinate President Kennedy. Prior to the assassination, various Mafia leaders were heard to threaten JFK's life. The Mafia were believed to of pay JFK's way into Power. They thought they had someone in the White House, however JFK began to crack down on Mafia. On November 20, two Mafia men told Rose Cheramie that it was common knowledge in the underworld that Kennedy was about to be killed. Mafia-CIA man David Ferrie was very probably involved in framing Oswald whil ...
    Related: assassination, assassination of jfk, kennedy assassination, case studies, attorney general
  • Assassination Of Jfk - 1,703 words
    Assassination of JFK On Friday, November 22nd 1963 at 12:30 P.M. the 35th president of the United States of America, John Fitzgerald Kennedy assassinated while he rode in an open limousine though the streets of Dallas. This event, which abruptly and severely altered the course of history, it has created more controversy than any other single event. Some haunting questions remain. "Who did it?" "Why did they do it?" "How was it done?" "Was there a cover up" The official answers complied by the Warren Commission have never satisfied the majority of the world's population. In this following essay I will try to show who was responsible for the assassination of John F. Kennedy. I believe the only ...
    Related: assassination, assassination of jfk, bay of pigs invasion, john kennedy, ranking
  • Black Panthers - 963 words
    Black Panthers Black Panthers Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale founded the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in October 1966, in Oakland, California. The name was shortened to the Black Panther Party later. Stokely Carmicheal, the leader of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) also joined the Black Panther Party. The Black Panther Party's main goals were to end police brutality, and strengthen Black communities through organization and education. There was only one problem in their plan. The problem was J. Edgar Hoover. J. Edgar Hoover was the director of the FBI, and he got the Federal Bureau of Investigation involved. He wanted to make America safer. While J. Edgar Hoover ...
    Related: black liberation, black nationalism, black nationalist, black panther, black panther party, black people, panther party
  • Branch - 1,159 words
    Branch King a true pillar of civil rights movement By Stuart Levitan, May 22, 1998 Our greatest mass movement has a historian able to tell its overwhelming story. The civil rights movement of the early 1960s, a transcendent time in American life, played out an epochal saga of biblical proportions. The stakes were immense -- first freedom, then the franchise. The risk was absolute. The actors, whether heroic or villainous, were towering figures. Taylor Branch's Pulitzer Prize-winning Parting the Waters'' (1988) was sweeping, subtle, overwhelming, depressing, inspiring. Pillar of Fire,'' second of Branch's movement trilogy, covering 1963-65, is as good or better. Branch chronicles a staggering ...
    Related: branch, justice department, civil rights, civil rights movement, romantic
  • Charlie Chaplain - 1,872 words
    Charlie Chaplain Charlie Chaplin was born on April 15, 1889, in London, England to Charles Chaplin, Sr., and Hannah Hill. He was taught to sing before he could talk and danced just as soon as he could walk. At a very young age Chaplin was told that he would be the most famous person in the world. When Charlie was five years old he sang for his mother on stage. Everyone in the audience loved him and threw their money onto the stage. When Chaplin was eight, he appeared in a clog dancing act called "Eight Lancashire Lads" Once again he was loved by the audience and he was excited with the attention he received. Charlie's half-brother , Sidney, became his agent and when Charlie was ten years old ...
    Related: chaplain, charlie, charlie chaplin, york times, modern times
  • Huey P Newton And The Black Panther Party - 1,428 words
    ... hers engaged young people who had given up society that they could make a difference and stop the daily brutality of police, which haunted many cities ( Acoli 1) . Hugh Pearson argues that the Panthers 'in your face' action has shaped the way police officers act in neighborhoods today. The party's message spread across the country like wildfire, engaging young Blacks in Northern Black communities. Branches of the Party in New York, Chicago and Oakland worked with gangs, trying to turn them away from violence and into community organizing ( Acoli 2). Vincent Harding historian of the civil rights movement said: The Panthers offered the young urban black male a purpose in their life. They w ...
    Related: black community, black history, black liberation, black nationalist, black panther, black panther party, black people
  • Image And Reality - 1,489 words
    Image And Reality Valery Potakh Mr. Anderson US History 1A, P.7 24 November 1998 Image and Reality In the years since the thousand days many questions have been raised and are still being studied about John F. Kennedy. A Life of John F. Kennedy: A Question of Character is a book written by Thomas C. Reeves, in which Reeves discusses these issues. JFK was a great man, and yet there are still some things that one must take into consideration. His morality was always somewhat of an uncertainty; be that as it may, these questions are still not openly discussed. People were always taken aback by his personality, good looks, and youth. After his death, it was quite difficult for most people to acc ...
    Related: white house, frank sinatra, j edgar hoover, visiting, essence
  • Japanese Immigrants And The Following Generations Had To Endure - 1,005 words
    ... the states farm crop.(Klimova,3) Autin Anson of the Grower-Shipper Association of Salinas, California, made this statement while lobbying for the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans: "Were charged with wanting to get rid of the Japs for selfish reasons. We might as well be honest. We do. Its a question of whether the white man lives on the Pacific Coast or the brown men. They came into this valley to work, and they stayed to take over."(Spickard,97) This terribly racist statement explains on e conflict over the limited resources available. The dominant group wants the competition removed and deep the minority group with as little as possible. Lieutenant General John L. Dewitt, the h ...
    Related: endure, fifth generation, japanese, japanese american, limited resources
  • Jedgar Hoover - 1,431 words
    J.Edgar Hoover J. Edgar Hoover was a young 25-year-old when he became the acting director of the Federal Bureau of Investigations. His first federal job was as a clerk in the files division, and he quickly became one of the most respected and feared men in the free world. Even presidents knew better than to cross him. A consummate politician, Hoover was one of the first to ride the "media train" to power. He used the media as a tool and he knew that what people read and what they see and hear directly affect what they think. A brief biography, as an introduction to the man will aid us in the understanding of who he was, and through this we may gain incite into the reasons for why he did the ...
    Related: hoover, j edgar hoover, media coverage, justice department, police
  • Jfk - 1,132 words
    ... cene of the killing. Within eighty minutes of the assassination, Oswald resisted arrest by attempting to shoot another Dallas police officer. Nevertheless, after thorough investigation, the assassination commission had found no evidence that anyone assisted Oswald in planning or carrying out the assassination. One other conspiracy theory is Lyndon B. Johnson Theory. President Kennedy was planning to run for re-election and wanted to exclude Johnson from the ticket as vice-presidential candidate. This upset Johnson, therefore he planned and coerced the assassination of JFK. LBJ was obviously the one with the most to gain from the murder. It is established the Johnson was allegedly the typ ...
    Related: lyndon b johnson, fidel castro, conspiracy theory, greer
  • Jfk: Was His Assassination Inevitable - 1,232 words
    JFK: WAS HIS ASSASSINATION INEVITABLE? A popular misconception is that President John F. Kennedy's assassination was an isolated event perpetrated by one man. This could not be farther from the truth. Instead, it was the result of a complex combination of domestic and foreign events. When President Kennedy was in office, he had to deal with many issues, ranging from business and finance to crime-fighting and war issues. Perhaps it is not as important to decide who it was that killed him, but why. President Kennedy's decisions and courses of action were not popular with everybody, and thus it is not surprising that his assassination was inevitable. The people who might have wanted John F. Ken ...
    Related: assassination, inevitable, richard nixon, president kennedy, blockade
  • Jfk: Was His Assassination Inevitable - 1,264 words
    ... nse 6 with the CIA in a supporting role. With these two documents, Kennedy had effectively restricted the CIA.15 Would it be a surprise then, if the CIA, in an effort to get rid of Kennedy and replace him with a more favorable president, assassinated him? Another group that quite possible wanted JFK dead was the Military Industrial Complex. Just exactly what is the MIC? It is the supplier of every plane, gun, bullet and uniform. Just about every organization that supplies or is hired by the government to build weapons. The relationship between the government and the MIC is a very important one, and this relationship is important in understanding if the MIC wanted Kennedy dead or not.16 W ...
    Related: assassination, inevitable, federal reserve, j edgar hoover, investigation
  • Mccarthy Gave His Name To An Age, But There Was Far More To Mccarthyism Than Mccarthy - 1,683 words
    'McCarthy gave his name to an age, but there was far more to McCarthyism than McCarthy' Do you agree? McCarthy may have given his name to an era but there was much more to McCarthyism than just one man. In this essay the argument will be that there were many factors leading up to the McCarthy era both internal and external and that McCarthy found a platform in anticommunist fear, as it was popular issue at the time. And his fall from grace in 1954 may also be attributed to both internal and external factors that appeared to alleviate the anticommunist threat. Today we call it the McCarthy era. While convenient, the tribute is not without reason. McCarthys villainy was so plain that his name ...
    Related: mccarthyism, civil liberties, cold war, alger hiss, involvement
  • Mccarthy Gave His Name To An Age, But There Was Far More To Mccarthyism Than Mccarthy - 1,691 words
    ... Nichols personally took McCarthy under his wing and instructed him in how to release a story just before the press deadlines, so that reporters wouldnt have time to ask for rebuttals . Even more importantly Nichols advised McCarthy that he should avoid using phrases such as card-carrying and relace them with communist `sympathisers or loyalty risk which did not require as much prove of their involvement with Communist Parties . When McCarthy won re-election and became chairman of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the Senate Government Operations Committee, Hoover gave him names of ex-communists and information on what they could testify to. Hoover also helped McCarthy choos ...
    Related: mccarthyism, cold war, berlin blockade, brief history, overseas
  • Modern Day Epic Story - 1,293 words
    Modern Day Epic Story EPIC STORY Looking back I underestimated the true capability of Carrera. Carrera was a man of intellectual prowess and had a supernatural ability to open car doors and start them with his mind. He was only five foot six inches tall with a medium build and he always wore a fishermans hat to hide the fact he didnt have any hair. Despite being only thirty-one years old, he managed to pull off the biggest car stings in the history of automobiles. With the help of unknown outside parties he managed to steal every type of sport car imaginable. He stole cars all over North America and was undetected by the authorities. If you havent guessed by now, he got his name from a sport ...
    Related: epic, orlando florida, north america, police department, boss
  • Organized Crime Has For Nearly One Hundred Years Held An Unseen Control Over The United States Running Both Illegal And Legal - 1,454 words
    ... o get the investigator off Luciano's back for the votes but the deal turned bad (Jacobs, p. 72). As soon as Roosevelt had secured his winning of New York, he immediately turned against the mobsters to win a public appeal. Luciano soon afterwards became public enemy number one. Now he was in the public eye which was against his own wishes. Luciano then redirected his criminal activities to less violent measures. The mob was soon highly involved with gambling, both legal and illegal. Luciano saw an untapped market in the Caribbean and Cuba where he set up casinos. Until he was ran out of Cuba by a new head of power, Fidel Castro, Luciano was without many troubles (Jacobs, p. 74). All the w ...
    Related: crime, illegal, organized crime, unseen, j edgar hoover
  • Richard Joseph Daley, The Grandson Of Irish Immigrants, Was Born In The Bridgeport Area Of Chicago On May 15, 1902 He Was Gra - 1,242 words
    Richard Joseph Daley, the grandson of Irish immigrants, was born in the Bridgeport area of Chicago on May 15, 1902. He was graduated from De La Salle Institute in 1918 and worked in the stockyards for several years before studying law. While studying, he worked as a clerk in the Cook County Controller's office. In 1936 Daley married Eleanor Guilfoyle, and the couple had three daughters and four sons. One son, Richard M. Daley, served in the Illinois Senate and as Cook County state's attorney before being elected mayor of Chicago in 1989. Daley held several elected posts before becoming mayor. He was state representative from 1936 to 1938, state senator from 1939 to 1946, county deputy contro ...
    Related: chicago, chicago tribune, irish, irish immigrants, joseph
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