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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: isolation

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  • From The Very Opening Of The Play When Richard Iii Enters Solus, The Protagonists Isolation Is Made Clear Richards - 1,737 words
    From the very opening of the play when Richard III enters solus, the protagonist's isolation is made clear. Richard's isolation progresses as he separates himself from the other characters and breaks the natural bonds between Man and nature through his efforts to gain power. The first scene of the play begins with a soliloquy, which emphasizes Richard's physical isolation as he appears alone as he speaks to the audience. This idea of physical isolation is heightened by his references to his deformity, such as rudely stamp'd...Cheated of feature by Dissembling Nature, deformed, unfinished. This deformity would be an outward indication to the audience of the disharmony from Nature and viciousn ...
    Related: isolation, shakespearean play, divine justice, turning point, familial
  • In William Shakespeares Play Hamlet, The Concept Of Cultural Identity Is Explored Through Hamlets Isolation Which Is Created - 1,875 words
    In William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the concept of cultural identity is explored through Hamlet's isolation which is created by the conflict between his duty to his father, and his duties to the monarchy and society. Hamlet is isolated from his society due to his turbulent emotions which result from his indecision on how to respond to his father's murder. Hamlet's duty as a son is to avenge his father's death and he would be supported in his actions by society if the murderer was believed to be guilty. Hamlet's duty as a citizen and a Prince is to protect the King and to ensure stability in the monarchy. In order for Hamlet to revenge his father he would have to kill the King which creates ...
    Related: cultural identity, isolation, king hamlet, prince hamlet, william shakespeare
  • Isolation - 1,430 words
    Isolation Nicole Bumbacco Ms. Hannah ELC 4AO Dec 23, 1999 Isolation is defined in the Websters Encyclopedic Dictionary as occurring when something is placed apart or alone. Naturally, humans are faced with feelings of isolation at certain times throughout their lives. However, there are particular types of isolation that capture the imagination of writers and artists. Canadian authors are drawn towards the theme of isolation in their literature. Characters portrayed in Canadian literature are either spiritually, emotionally, physically or geographically isolated. Isolation can either have a positive or negative affect on humans. Humans are often driven mad by isolation, where their only mean ...
    Related: isolation, canadian literature, negative effect, short story, trespass
  • Isolation In The Dance And The Railroad And The Strong Breed - 554 words
    Isolation In The Dance And The Railroad And The Strong Breed An overall theme of isolation permeates through both Wole Soyinka's The Strong Breed and David Henry Hwang's The Dance and the Railroad. Every character in these two plays suffers from some form of isolation from the rest of their society. Although Hwang's Lone and Soyinka's Girl are isolated for markedly different reasons and take opposite roads in their character growth, they share many similarities including often mirroring their society and some of their treatment of other characters. In The Dance and the Railroad, Lone has self imposed his isolation from the rest of the railroad workers. He describes them to Ma as "dead men," ...
    Related: breed, dance, isolation, railroad, wole soyinka
  • Japan In Isolation - 829 words
    Japan in Isolation Japan in Isolation The problem question being dealt with is "To what extent was Tokugawa Japan's policy of isolation a benefit or drawback when examined in terms of social stability, treatment of foreign influences, and standard of living?" The benefits of isolation when looked at by the subject of social stability are numerous. The social stability of Japan during isolation was something to be looked at upon with great respect. Isolation gave Japan stability and internal solidarity at a time when these factors were urgently needed. Under the new system of Tokugawa merchants were at the bottom however, encouraged by the availability of money, they bought, sold, traded and ...
    Related: isolation, japan, technological change, social status, peasants
  • Radioactive Wastes, Must For The Protection Of Mankind Be Stored Or Disposed In Such A Manner That Isolation From The Biosphe - 1,830 words
    Radioactive wastes, must for the protection of mankind be stored or disposed in such a manner that isolation from the biosphere is assured until they have decayed to innocuous levels. If this is not done, the world could face severe physical problems to living species living on this planet. Some atoms can disintegrate spontaneously. As they do, they emit ionizing radiation. Atoms having this property are called radioactive. By far the greatest number of uses for radioactivity in Canada relate not to the fission, but to the decay of radioactive materials - radioisotopes. These are unstable atoms that emit energy for a period of time that varies with the isotope. During this active period, whi ...
    Related: disposed, isolation, mankind, radioactive, radioactive waste
  • Richard Iii Tragedy In Isolation - 1,207 words
    Richard III - Tragedy in Isolation "The tragedy of Richard III lies in the progressive isolation of its protagonist". Discuss. From the very opening of the play when Richard III enters"solus", the protagonist's isolation is made clear. Richard's isolation progresses as he separates himself from the other characters and breaks the natural bonds between Man and nature through his efforts to gain power. The first scene of the play begins with a soliloquy, which emphasizes Richard's physical isolation as he appears alone as he speaks to the audience. This idea of physical isolation is heightened by his references to his deformity, such as "rudely stamp'd...Cheated of feature by Dissembling Natur ...
    Related: isolation, tragedy, turning point, king edward, lover
  • Three Emperors's League: Austria, Hungary, Germany, And Russia - 243 words
    1. Three Emperorss League: In 1873 this league linked the monarchs of Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia in an alliance against racial movements. 2. Russian-German Reassurance Treaty: When the young impetuous German emperor William 2 dismissed Bismarck in part because of the chancellors friendly policy towards Russia since the 1870s. He then adamantly refused to sign the Russian-German Reassurance Treaty, in spite of Russian willingness to do so. This fateful departure in foreign affairs prompted long-isolated republican France to court absolutist Russia, offering loans, arms, and friendships. 3. William 2: a young impetuous German emperor who refused to sign the Russian-German Reassurance ...
    Related: russia, austria hungary, great britain, foreign affairs, hungry
  • 100 Years Of Solitude - 917 words
    100 Years Of Solitude 100 Years of Solitude Just as Edmund Spenser believes in the ever-whirling wheel of Change; that which all mortal things doth sway, so too does Gabriel Garca Mrquez. In One Hundred Years of Solitude, Colonel Aureliano Buenda experiences life and the changes which accompany it. Spenser views human life as a constant change from one stage to another. The change may be either good or bad; but one thing is certain, change is inevitable. Colonel Buenda is a dynamic character who transforms from an idealistic leader into an increasingly cynical and corrupt man. Toward the end of his life, he isolates himself from the rest of the world. In the beginning of Aurelianos career, h ...
    Related: one hundred years of solitude, solitude, book reports, edmund spenser, surviving
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 905 words
    1984 By George Orwell George Orwell was not only a writer, but also an important political reformer. Orwell was born in India in 1903. He considered his family a lower-middle class family. He said this because his family was a part of the middle class, but had little money. His father worked for the British government and was able to be apart of the middle class without money. Orwell lived in Britain and went to boarding school there on scholarships. He was the poorest student among many wealthy children. Orwell felt like an outsider at the boarding schools he went to. The students were all kept in line by beatings. This was Orwell's first taste of dictatorship, being helpless under the rule ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, winston smith, middle class
  • A Brave New World Aldous Huxley 81932, 1946 Aldous Huxley Harpercollins Publishers Ltd Ny,ny 10022 - 1,168 words
    A Brave New World. Aldous Huxley. 81932, 1946 Aldous Huxley. HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. NY,NY. 10022 . P 1 AA squat grey building of only thirty-four stories. Over the main entrance the words, CENTRAL LONDON HATCHERY AND CONDITIONING CENTRE, and, in a shield, the World State=s motto, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY.@ Here is a document I found on the web which helped me (embedded as an OLE object) : P 13 ANothing like oxygen-shortage for keeping an embryo below par.@ AThe lower the caste . . . the shorter the oxygen.@ P 19 AThey hurried out of the room and returned in a minute or two, each pushing a kind of tall dumb-waiter laden, on all its four wire-netted shelves, with eight-month-old b ...
    Related: aldous, aldous huxley, brave, brave new world, huxley, world aldous huxley, world state
  • A Closed Family In Anne Tylers Dinner At The Homesick Restaraunt - 853 words
    A Closed Family In Anne Tyler's Dinner At The Homesick Restaraunt A Closed Family: Growth Through Suffering The novel Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant is one of Tyler's more complex because it involves not only the growth of the mother, Pearl Tull, but each of her children as well. Pearl must except her faults in raising her children, and her children must all face their own loneliness, jealousy, or imperfection. It is in doing this that they find connections to their family. They find growth through suffering. "Cody Tull, the oldest child and the one most damaged by the failure of his parents' marriage he becomes an aggressive, quarrelsome efficiency expert."(Voelker 126) He feels that it ...
    Related: anne, anne tyler, dinner, family business, family life, homesick
  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • A Lot Of Great Canadian Authors Base Their Books On The Prairie Or Land And Its Inhabitants Wild Geese By Martha Ostenso Is A - 1,025 words
    A lot of great Canadian authors base their books on the prairie or land and its inhabitants. Wild Geese by Martha Ostenso is a wonderful example of this. Throughout the novel, many references are made to natural elements and also animals. Three very noticeable references could be picked out. These references were made to Judith, who is seen as a wild horse, to the wild geese that always move to new places, and also to the weather and how the family's attitudes and emotions, especially Caleb's, are changed by it. Wild Geese are talked about quite frequently throughout this novel. There are many references to people who are compared to the wild goose, along with what they symbolize. Lind Arche ...
    Related: authors, canadian, inhabitants, martha, prairie
  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • A Personal Information - 1,287 words
    A. Personal Information Arthur Kornberg (1918-), American biochemist and physician, claims he has never met "a dull enzyme." He has devoted his life to pursuing and purifying these critical protein molecules. His love of science did not spring from a family history rooted in science. He was born on March 3rd, 1918, the son of a sewing machine operator in the sweatshops of the Lower East Side of New York City. His parents, Joseph Aaron Kornberg and Lena Rachel Katz, were immigrant Jews who made great sacrifices to ensure the safety of their family. They had fled Poland, for if they had stayed, they would have been murdered in a German concentration camp. His grandfather had abandoned the pate ...
    Related: personal information, national institute, york city, lincoln high school, spending
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,067 words
    A Rose For Emily "A Rose for Emily" In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner's symbolic use of the "rose" is essential to the story's theme of Miss Emily's self-isolation. The rose is often a symbol of love, and portrays an everlasting beauty. The rose has been used for centuries to illustrate an everlasting type of love and faithfulness. Even when a rose dies, it is still held in high regard. Miss Emily's "rose" exists only within the story's title. Faulkner leaves the reader to interpret the rose's symbolic meaning. Miss Emily was denied the possibility of falling in love in her youth, so subsequently she isolated herself from the world and denied the existence of change. Miss Emily was den ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, emily william faulkner, miss emily grierson, rose for emily
  • A Rose For Emily: Characterization - 425 words
    A Rose for Emily: Characterization Characterization refers to the techniques a writer uses to develop characters. In the story A Rose for Emily William Faulkner uses characterization to reveal the character of Miss Emily. He expresses the content of her character through physical description, through her actions, words, and feelings, through a narrator's direct comments about the character's nature, and through the actions, words, and feelings, of other characters. Faulkner best uses characterization to examine the theme of the story, too much pride can end in homicidal madness. Miss Emily, the main character of this story, lives for many years as a recluse, someone who has withdrawn from a ...
    Related: a rose for emily, characterization, rose for emily, emily william faulkner, main character
  • A Separate Peace - 294 words
    A Separate Peace A Separate Peace is a remarkable story about the relationship between two young students, Gene and Phineas. Their friendship develops through the formation of secret societies and late night card games. A tragic event, at first glance an accident, changes their lives forever. As the story unfolds the friends have to deal with the fact that the unfortunate event was no accident. An extremely well written book, A Separate Peace is a wartime story about New Hampshire schoolboys as they approach maturity and learning how to handle adult responsibilities. The story begins with minor incidents among friends. As the plot becomes more complex the story takes on new meanings. A Separ ...
    Related: separate peace, main character, good and evil, late night, remarkable
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