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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: isolated

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  • Imagine A Person With No Feelings, No Friends, Isolated Both Emotionally And Physically They Dont Feel Threatened By Normal T - 1,549 words
    Imagine a person with no feelings, no friends, isolated both emotionally and physically. They dont feel threatened by "normal" things, making the "normal" person threatened by him. In the book, The Stranger, by Albert Camus, we embark on a journey through the mind of an existentialist. So we meet Mersault, the main character in the book, and in my opinion, the epitome of existentialism. Throughout reading, we have observed Mersaults self-aware behavior in many scenes of the book. One instance was at the funeral. "Some of the women were crying. She was in the second row, hidden behind one of her companions, and I couldnt see her very well. She was crying softly, steadily in little sobs. I tho ...
    Related: emotionally, isolated, physical attraction, different forms, woman
  • Three Emperors's League: Austria, Hungary, Germany, And Russia - 243 words
    1. Three Emperorss League: In 1873 this league linked the monarchs of Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia in an alliance against racial movements. 2. Russian-German Reassurance Treaty: When the young impetuous German emperor William 2 dismissed Bismarck in part because of the chancellors friendly policy towards Russia since the 1870s. He then adamantly refused to sign the Russian-German Reassurance Treaty, in spite of Russian willingness to do so. This fateful departure in foreign affairs prompted long-isolated republican France to court absolutist Russia, offering loans, arms, and friendships. 3. William 2: a young impetuous German emperor who refused to sign the Russian-German Reassurance ...
    Related: russia, austria hungary, great britain, foreign affairs, hungry
  • A Farewell To Arms A Love Story - 1,085 words
    A Farewell to Arms - A Love Story A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a typical love story. A Romeo and his Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo is Frederick Henry and Juliet is Catherine Barkley. Their love affair must survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy adds to the tragedy of the love story. The war affects the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick must outlast long separations, life-threatening war-time situations, and the uncertainty of each other's whereabouts or condition. This novel is a beautiful love story of two people who need each other in a period of upheaval. Frederick Henry is ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, love affair, love story
  • A History Of Christianity In Egypt - 1,135 words
    ... s the Thracian) however, responded by increasing persecutions in his territory of Egypt. The story is told that once before the Battle of Milvian Bridge (by which Constantine took complete control of the Western Empire) when the odds were greatly against him, Constantine beseeched God for help, praying in the Christian fashion, and won the day. He later adopted the Chi-Rho, a stylized monogram of the first letters of "Christus," as his standard, and led his armies to victory after victory. Because of this, Constantine was even more well-disposed towards the Christians, though he himself was not baptized a Christian until his deathbed. In 313 together with Licinius, the eastern Augustus, ...
    Related: christianity, egypt, history, asia minor, holy land
  • A Introduction - 1,026 words
    A. Introduction During the last twenty years, industrial livestock farms have been replacing the traditional family size farms that once raised most of the nations swine. The number of livestock animals produced in the United States has grown modestly in the past two decades, but the number of farms raising them has slunk dramatically because large producer now dominate the market. The large increase in industry farming has led to large quantities of manure. B. Problem Definition The over abundance of manure has become a problem that leads to problem with Pollution, heated debates between the industries and societies (people of the community), ways to try and find solutions for the pollution ...
    Related: dissolved oxygen, problem definition, real estate, solid, dairy
  • A Lot Of Great Canadian Authors Base Their Books On The Prairie Or Land And Its Inhabitants Wild Geese By Martha Ostenso Is A - 1,025 words
    A lot of great Canadian authors base their books on the prairie or land and its inhabitants. Wild Geese by Martha Ostenso is a wonderful example of this. Throughout the novel, many references are made to natural elements and also animals. Three very noticeable references could be picked out. These references were made to Judith, who is seen as a wild horse, to the wild geese that always move to new places, and also to the weather and how the family's attitudes and emotions, especially Caleb's, are changed by it. Wild Geese are talked about quite frequently throughout this novel. There are many references to people who are compared to the wild goose, along with what they symbolize. Lind Arche ...
    Related: authors, canadian, inhabitants, martha, prairie
  • A Quantum Computer A Future Technology - 1,415 words
    A Quantum Computer... a future technology Mike Damewood By the strange laws of quantum mechanics, Folger, a senior editor at Discover, notes, an electron, proton, or other subatomic particle is "in more than one place at a time," because individual particles behave like waves, these different places are different states that an atom can exist in simultaneously. Ten years ago, Folger writes, David Deutsch, a physicist at Oxford University, argued that it may be possible to build an extremely powerful computer based on this peculiar reality. In 1994, Peter Shor, a mathematician at AT&T Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, proved that, in theory at least, a full-blown quantum computer could factor ...
    Related: quantum, quantum computer, quantum mechanics, technology, simple steps
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,067 words
    A Rose For Emily "A Rose for Emily" In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner's symbolic use of the "rose" is essential to the story's theme of Miss Emily's self-isolation. The rose is often a symbol of love, and portrays an everlasting beauty. The rose has been used for centuries to illustrate an everlasting type of love and faithfulness. Even when a rose dies, it is still held in high regard. Miss Emily's "rose" exists only within the story's title. Faulkner leaves the reader to interpret the rose's symbolic meaning. Miss Emily was denied the possibility of falling in love in her youth, so subsequently she isolated herself from the world and denied the existence of change. Miss Emily was den ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, emily william faulkner, miss emily grierson, rose for emily
  • A Rose For Emily A Closer Look - 1,288 words
    A Rose For Emily A Closer Look 12/2/97 period 1 William Faulkners A Rose for Emily tells the story of a young woman who is violated by her fathers strict mentality. After being the only man in her life Emilys father dies and she finds it hard to let go. Emily was raised in the ante-bellum period before the Civil War. This story takes place in the Reconstruction Era after the war when the North takes control of the South. Like her father Miss Emily possesses a stubborn outlook towards life, she refuses to change. This short story explains Emily, her mystified ways and the townsfolks sympathetic curiosity. The plot of the story is mainly about Miss Emilys attitude about change. On the first of ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, rose for emily, black woman
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,662 words
    ... truth, the shadowy, elusive truth of an instant that is already beginning to fade in memory. Gene is about to make a full confession--or he thinks he is--when Dr. Stanpole and the nurse arrive. The following day Finny is sent home to recuperate. The summer session comes to an end, appropriately enough for Gene, for until now summer had represented freedom, sports, and running outdoors, with Finny as the light and life of it all. Now all that has changed. A month later, after a sojourn at home, Gene heads back to school for his senior year. On the way he makes a detour to call on Finny. NOTE: The "surprise" reunion is no surprise to Finny, who appears to have been waiting anxiously in hop ...
    Related: separate peace, ultimate punishment, last time, self awareness, burning
  • A Tale Of Two Cities Charles Dickens 18121870 - 1,809 words
    A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens (1812-1870) A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Type of Work: Historical fiction Setting London and Paris during the French Revolution (1789-1799) Principal Characters Dr. Manette, a French physician, wrongfully imprisoned for 18 years Lucie Manette, his daughter Charles Darnay, a former French aristocrat who has repudiated his title and left France to live in England Jarvis Lorry, the able representative of Tellson & Co., a banking house Sydney Carton, a law clerk Madame Defarge, a French peasant and longtime revolutionary Story Overveiw (In the year 1775, King George III sat on the throne of England, preoccupied with his rebellious colo ...
    Related: charles darnay, charles dickens, tale, tale of two cities, historical fiction
  • A Triumphent Withdrawal - 1,409 words
    A Triumphent Withdrawal A Triumphent Withdrawal I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain-and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. Acquainted with the night, by Robert Frost Anthology of American Literature (1010) Edward A. Robinson was the first most important poet of the Twentieth Century. He is a peoples poet his poems' characters often provide physiological portraits of fictional and historical characters suffering an isolation of some sort (990). Robinson is considered a transitional figure; he is the precursor of Modernist poetry. He uses the older traditional influences of form and rhyme and his poems are often simple and neat. However, in ...
    Related: withdrawal, best friend, robert frost, human experience, depth
  • Academic Stress - 1,365 words
    Academic Stress Picture a typical, hard-working student. Each day she recieves multiple assignments to complete for homework. She is involved in several extracurricular activities so she doesnt have much extra time. After sports practice, she struggles home, ladden with books, to begin studying. On a typical evening she has to work diligently for a couple of hours to complete her homework for school the next day. She has a rigorous schedule that includes honors and advanced placement classes so some nights she is forced to stay up very late to keep up with her classes. Other nights she has an extra packet of work to complete for her SAT Prep course. All this work puts a lot of pressure on he ...
    Related: academic, more prone, school students, positive effects, monitor
  • Adolescence Is A Time Of Storm And Strife - 1,781 words
    Adolescence Is A Time Of Storm And Strife : : Introduction : : Adolescence is a time of storm and strife. Adolescence is a period of time between childhood and adulthood. This is the age when one can either make something of his life or destroy it all, this is the time when a person makes those friends who changes the how he looks at life and how he faces it. An adolescent's main goal these days is to fit in and not be different from their peers. In this paper I will explore the probabilities of the following grievances experienced by the adolescent youth which are drugs, suicide, and homelessness. : : Body of the Essay : : Adolescence is the developmental stage between childhood and adultho ...
    Related: adolescence, storm, primary care, outdoor recreation, people's
  • Affirmative Action - 1,098 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action ? The Right Approach? In the beginning, it seemed simple enough. In 1961, John F. Kennedy, then president of the United States of America, established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity by executive order. The goal was to curb discrimination by the government and its contractors, who were now required to ?not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin. The Contractor will take affirmative action, to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin.? Title VI of the Civil Right ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, equal employment, lyndon b johnson, adopt
  • Aids - 1,564 words
    Aids Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! AIDS "Somewhere among the million children who go to New York's publicly financed schools is a seven-year-old child suffering from AIDS. A special health and education panel had decided, on the strength of the guidelines issued by the federal Centers for Disease Control, that the child would be no danger to his classmates. Yet, when the school year started on September 9th, several thousand parents in two school districts in the borough of Queens kept their children at home. Fear of plague can be as pernicious, and contagious, as the plague itself(Fear of dying 1)." This article was written in 1985. Since then much has been fou ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, social class, blood transfusion, matchmaker
  • Aids - 1,527 words
    ... AIDS from handshakes, hugs, coughs, sneezes, sweat, tears, mosquitoes, or other insects, pets, eating food prepared by someone else, or just being around an infected person. A person can't get it from sharing a cigarette, cigar, or pipe, drinking from the same fountain, or from someone spitting on him or her. A person also can't get it from using the same swimming pools, toilet seats, phones, computers, straws, spoons, or cups. Although the virus has been found in saliva, medical opinion states there is no evidence of contamination through wet kissing(What are HIV/AIDS 1). HIV is not spread through the air or water, unlike many other viruses(HIV/AIDS 2). No one has ever caught AIDS by go ...
    Related: aids, protease inhibitors, local government, state and local government, isolated
  • Aids - 1,103 words
    Aids Aids Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), suppresses the immune system related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A person infected with HIV gradually loses immune function along with certain immune cells called CD4 T-lymphocytes or CD4 T-cells, causing the infected person to become vulnerable to pneumonia, fungus infections, and other common ailments. With the loss of immune function, a clinical syndrome (a group of various illnesses that together characterize a disease) develops over time and eventually results in death due to opportunistic infections (infections by organisms that do not normally cause disease except in people whose immune systems have be ...
    Related: aids, deficiency syndrome, human immunodeficiency, acquired immune, bacterial
  • Aids - 1,443 words
    AIDS Gonzales 1 The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was first discovered in 1981 as a unique and newly recognized infection of the body's immune system (Mellors 3). The name AIDS was formally know as GRIDS (Gay Related Immune Defiance Syndrome). The first case of AIDS was discovered in Los Angeles, where scientists from the CDC (Center for Disease Control) were called in on a half dozen cases. The CDC was convinced what they were seeing was a new strand of virus. None of the staff members had ever seen a strand of virus that could do so much destruction to the immune system like this one did. Many theories about this disease were in question. Many scientists believed it originated ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, president clinton, health organization, sample
  • Aids Whats New - 1,666 words
    ... dical history-taking, questionnaires and donor inter- views. Very few people at risk of AIDS now come to give blood. The "self- elimination form", filled out in a private booth, allows any who feel compelled by peer pressure to donate blood, total privacy to check the box that says "Do not use my blood for transfusion." As to banking one's own blood, or autologous donations, the Red Cross permits a few "medically suitable" people, referred by their physician, to store their blood if they are likely to need blood transfusion in upcoming elective surgery. They can bank up to four units of blood, taken in the five weeks before surgery. Finally - it can be categorically stated - IT IS ABSOLU ...
    Related: aids, whats, influenza virus, research institute, awareness
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