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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: intrinsic

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  • Intrinsic Motivation Is Ideal - 1,846 words
    Intrinsic Motivation Is Ideal Inquisitive and self-directed learning is a natural behavior for young children. They marvel at each new discovery and strive to understand the meaning behind every question in their world. However, older children seem to be resistant to learning unless directed by teachers or parents with various forms of external recognition (Deci and Ryan, 1981). Their enthusiasm and inner desire for understanding has diminished. Learning, to older children has become directly connected to demands, controls, and rewards. In order to understand why this attitude toward learning develops, the concept of motivation in education must be defined and examined in a theoretical sense ...
    Related: intrinsic, intrinsic motivation, motivation, teacher education, people learn
  • Recognizing And Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation - 563 words
    Recognizing And Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation Running head: RECOGNIZING AND NURTURING INTRINSIC MOTIVATION Recognizing and Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation: A Cautionary Tale Article Critique Recognizing and Nurturing Intrinsic Motivation: A Cautionary Tale This article related to the pre-teaching experiences of educators and the necessity for training in the identification of intrinsic motivation in the gifted learner. For far too many years, gifted learners were only thought to be the achievers in the group. Those students that were able to excel in whatever assignment was given or any task at hand were generally those identified as the gifted and talented in the group. This paper implies t ...
    Related: intrinsic, intrinsic motivation, motivation, nurturing, recognizing
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,067 words
    A Rose For Emily "A Rose for Emily" In "A Rose for Emily," William Faulkner's symbolic use of the "rose" is essential to the story's theme of Miss Emily's self-isolation. The rose is often a symbol of love, and portrays an everlasting beauty. The rose has been used for centuries to illustrate an everlasting type of love and faithfulness. Even when a rose dies, it is still held in high regard. Miss Emily's "rose" exists only within the story's title. Faulkner leaves the reader to interpret the rose's symbolic meaning. Miss Emily was denied the possibility of falling in love in her youth, so subsequently she isolated herself from the world and denied the existence of change. Miss Emily was den ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, emily william faulkner, miss emily grierson, rose for emily
  • Abortion - 1,294 words
    Abortion There are few issues that can cause as many heated and sometimes, irrational, debates than that of abortion. The issue strikes at the very heart of an individual's religious and philosophical beliefs. Does a woman have the right to terminate a pregnancy? Is it moral to do so in any circumstance? Is a fetus a living human being? The debate has raged for nearly thirty years and there does not seem to be any end to the controversy that often results in violence. Irrational individuals who have committed murder want to make their beliefs heard and followed. In response to the question, some people have resulted to using qualifiers: no, abortion is not moral except if the pregnancy is th ...
    Related: abortion, morality of abortion, population growth, child abuse, candy
  • American Skinheads - 1,121 words
    American Skinheads The closely shaved scalp and spouting white-supremacist beliefs are difficult to miss. Indeed, American skinheads have carved out a niche for their radical and very violent approach to what they deem as social and racial injustice, much the same way the Ku Klux Klan has achieved for its members throughout the twentieth century. As the world continues to spiral toward complete and utter eradication, there exists a select sector of the population that refuses to allow this to happen without at least a good fight. American skinheads have long been at the forefront of controversy in their indignation toward racial intolerance. These ordinary citizens believe the very social bu ...
    Related: american, skinheads, military force, ultimate cause, mission
  • American Skinheads - 1,135 words
    ... of these groups is going to declare war (Anonymous 62). Indeed, an individual who espouses racial intolerance as part and parcel of being a human being is not an individual many others would appreciate being around, that is unless the other person shares the same inclination toward white supremacy. The challenge of living among diversity is to construe morality in such a way that it is flexible enough to accommodate very diverse circumstances and life-styles, but not yet to give up on a vision of a shared conception of the good life. An ethic of responsibility challenges us to recognize that there are alternative visions of the good life that can coexist within a social web of relations ...
    Related: american, skinheads, global history, negative aspects, diverse
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,376 words
    Anarchism And Liberalism Contemporary liberal and anarchist philosophy are both two very different ways of trying to see what would be the best way to run society. While discussing these two ideologies I will try to show how both, in their purist sense, are not able work in today's society effectively. Contemporary liberals are involved in every day politics but through over regulation and dependence on government they loose their chances of running a reliable democracy. Anarchist have very good ideas of how a natural society could function without government or modern institutions but the biggest problem they have is how to get to that point. Both theories look good on paper but once they h ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, social order, changing world
  • Anne Stevenson - 706 words
    Anne Stevenson " I thought you were my victory /though you cut me like a knife" (Stevenson 1-2) The opening lines of Anne Stevenson's poem The Victory set a tone of conflict. This poem, at its surface, expresses a mother's thoughts on giving birth to a son. Stevenson describes the mixed feelings many mothers have upon the delivery of their first born. The final release from pregnancy and birthing pains, coupled with the excitement of bringing a live creature into this world, at first seem a victory to the new parent. The author goes on to confute the event as a victory. Using words such as "antagonist" (5), "bruise" (6), and "scary"(13), she shows the darker side of childbirth. The mother ha ...
    Related: anne, stevenson, human life, human existence, bearing
  • Anne Stevenson - 706 words
    Anne Stevenson " I thought you were my victory /though you cut me like a knife" (Stevenson 1-2) The opening lines of Anne Stevenson's poem The Victory set a tone of conflict. This poem, at its surface, expresses a mother's thoughts on giving birth to a son. Stevenson describes the mixed feelings many mothers have upon the delivery of their first born. The final release from pregnancy and birthing pains, coupled with the excitement of bringing a live creature into this world, at first seem a victory to the new parent. The author goes on to confute the event as a victory. Using words such as "antagonist" (5), "bruise" (6), and "scary"(13), she shows the darker side of childbirth. The mother ha ...
    Related: anne, stevenson, human life, internal conflict, adult
  • Anne Stevenson - 706 words
    Anne Stevenson " I thought you were my victory /though you cut me like a knife" (Stevenson 1-2) The opening lines of Anne Stevenson's poem The Victory set a tone of conflict. This poem, at its surface, expresses a mother's thoughts on giving birth to a son. Stevenson describes the mixed feelings many mothers have upon the delivery of their first born. The final release from pregnancy and birthing pains, coupled with the excitement of bringing a live creature into this world, at first seem a victory to the new parent. The author goes on to confute the event as a victory. Using words such as "antagonist" (5), "bruise" (6), and "scary"(13), she shows the darker side of childbirth. The mother ha ...
    Related: anne, stevenson, human existence, human life, mixed
  • Anne Stevenson - 706 words
    Anne Stevenson " I thought you were my victory /though you cut me like a knife" (Stevenson 1-2) The opening lines of Anne Stevenson's poem The Victory set a tone of conflict. This poem, at its surface, expresses a mother's thoughts on giving birth to a son. Stevenson describes the mixed feelings many mothers have upon the delivery of their first born. The final release from pregnancy and birthing pains, coupled with the excitement of bringing a live creature into this world, at first seem a victory to the new parent. The author goes on to confute the event as a victory. Using words such as "antagonist" (5), "bruise" (6), and "scary"(13), she shows the darker side of childbirth. The mother ha ...
    Related: anne, stevenson, internal conflict, human life, pregnancy
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 979 words
    Approaches To Environmental Ethics And KantS Principle 1. All of the three approaches to environmental ethics use Kant's principle to various extents. The differences between them lie in their individual definitions of moral categories. It's like looking at the same slide under three different powers on a microscope. Each approach relies on Kant's principle to protect the interest of that which they deem worthy. Baxter's anthropocentric approach clearly states that our obligations regarding the environment are to be determined solely on the basis of human interests. Our welfare depends on breathable air, drinkable water and edible food. Thus, polluting the environment to the extent that it d ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, intrinsic value
  • Are Science And Religion One - 2,121 words
    ... rature if there is only one thing that exists? By definition temperature is the speed and frequency of collisions between particles. Thus we find ourselves once more in a paradoxical situation. On the one hand the equations predict a specific temperature greater than zero but, on the other hand, the unified state must be at temperature zero because there are no particle interactions. This tendency to paradox displayed by the equations of cosmology and built into the foundations of mathematics, if looked at squarely and taken at face value, is telling us something profound about the structure of the world. Paradox is built into the fabric of the universe in a profound and interesting way. ...
    Related: religion, science, face value, moral implications, advent
  • Aristotle - 1,197 words
    Aristotle Aristotle was born in 384 BC.; with him came the birth of Western realism. He was a student of Plato and a tutor to Alexander the Great (Founders, 1991). It is difficult to discuss the philosophies of Aristotle without bringing up those of his former tutor, Plato. Aristotle's philosophies diverted from Plato's, and led to Aristotle forming his own school, the Lyceum. After tutoring Alexander the Great for about five years, he founded the Lyceum in Athens, Greece (Wheelwright, 1983). The Lyceum was a philosophical school that dealt in matters such as metaphysics, logic, ethics, and natural sciences. When teaching at the Lyceum, Aristotle had a habit of walking about as he discoursed ...
    Related: aristotle, state university, human experience, athens greece, attempting
  • Aristotle On Pleasure - 2,610 words
    Aristotle On Pleasure After nine books of contemplating different aspects of the human good, Aristotle uses this opportunity to claim contemplation as the highest form of pleasure. The final book in Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with pleasures: the understanding of each kind, and why some pleasures are better than other pleasures. The book is essentially divided into two main parts, being pleasure and happiness. I will use Terence Irwin's translation and subdivisions as a guiding map for my own enquiry, and any quotation from will be taken from this text. Irwin divides the book into three sections: Pleasure, Happiness: Further discussion, and Ethics, Moral Education and Politics. With this ...
    Related: aristotle, pleasure, different ways, different aspects, relation
  • Aristotle: A Comprehensive View On Nature And Society - 1,198 words
    Aristotle: A Comprehensive View On Nature And Society In order to fully understand Aristotle's views on a natural system, it is necessary to first explain some general principles of his philosophy. It is in his work the Categories that Aristotle presents the concept of substance, a concept which will serve as the foundation for much of his philosophical system. Substance, for Aristotle, is not a universal, but rather, it is the particular; substance is not a ?such,? but a ?this.? Thus, substance is neither in nor is it said of a subject (as are qualities). Rather it is that which makes the subject numerically one; it is that which makes the subject the individual. Substance is an individual ...
    Related: comprehensive, human nature, nichomachean ethics, general principles, investigating
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,996 words
    Beyond The Problem Of Evil evil Beyond the Problem of Evil Introduction: The problem of evil is, in my opinion, the best point of departure for a fruitful dialogue between Christianity, traditionally conceived, and those strands of modern philosophy which have been perceived--indeed, have sometimes perceived themselves--as a threat to that tradition. As such, I will attempt first, to outline the problem of evil in the starkest terms possible, presenting Augustine's approach to its solution followed by a critical analysis; second, to present an alternative approach to the questions which give rise to the problem--an approach derived in large part from Spinoza and Nietzsche; and, third, to sho ...
    Related: good and evil, falls short, human experience, free choice, referring
  • Beyond The Problem Of Evil - 3,962 words
    ... is caught in his illusion of volition . . . [This illusion], his assumption that free will exists, is also part of the calculable mechanism ( 106). When a misfortune strikes, we can overcome it either by removing its cause or else by changing the effect it has on our feelings . . .( 108). There are elements in each of these texts--e.g., the denial of free will, the rejection of the idea retributive justice, and the recognition of possibility of overcoming our emotional reactions rather than our external environment--which resonate with the sympathetic reader of Spinoza. And while, in later years, Nietzsche loses some of his positivistic fervor, we shall see that significant similarities ...
    Related: good and evil, spoke zarathustra, heavenly father, c. s. lewis, attain
  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,759 words
    Bolsheviks In Wwi There were several major sources of conflict between the Bolsheviks and the western states in Europe from 1917 to 1921. Conflicting ideologies that each attacked the core of each other's respective society led to the notion that Capitalism and Communism could not coexist. The attempts of both actors to hold control of their own political system and to expand their political ideas internationally led to major conflicts between them. Also, the lack of respect for the upstart of the Bolshevik government by the west led to misperceptions concerning the actions of the Soviets. Russia's unsatisfactory involvement World War I and its abrupt departure from the war, which affected t ...
    Related: bolshevik party, bolsheviks, britain france, private property, imperialist
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