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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: interpersonal

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  • Interpersonal Attraction - 703 words
    Interpersonal Attraction Relationships with the individuals around us are key to ones social existence. Personal accounts by people who have been isolated from the outside world serve as a reminder of our dependence on others. What draws us into these "relationships"? Studies of interpersonal attraction have concluded that people are attracted mostly to those that they find physically attractive and who are geographically close. The first step to understanding why we are attracted to certain individuals we must first understand an individuals person perception or the process of forming impressions of others. First impressions often help us to determine whether we are attracted to another ind ...
    Related: attraction, interpersonal, work environment, early stages, sharing
  • Quality Interpersonal Relationships - 1,141 words
    QUALITY INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS A quality interpersonal relationship is a relationship which is built on understanding of self and others. A quality interpersonal relationship goes beyound just being casually aquainted with others to sharing with and gaining an understanding of one another. What I mean by sharing with is that you get a feeling for each other. I can empathize with you and see things through your eyes. When a quality interpersonal relationship is present there's certain amount of synergy that takes place between the persons involved in the relationship. A good example of a quality interpersonal relationship could be found within the strong family unit. If we were to study ...
    Related: interpersonal, interpersonal relationship, relationships, best friend, most effective
  • Social Psychology: Interpersonal And Group Perspectives - 705 words
    Social Psychology: Interpersonal And Group Perspectives Social Psychology: Interpersonal and Group Perspectives In our textbook, prejudice is defined as: a form of thinking whereby an individual forms an unfavorable attitude directed towards groups of people, based on insufficient or incorrect evidence about these groups. Prejudice has been a part of society for as long as society has been. There are many different theories on the reasons for why people form prejudices. The theory of social categorization states that it is human nature to put people into categories based on certain characteristics. Which is also how we form stereotypes. Stereotypes give us a preconceived notion of how people ...
    Related: interpersonal, social identity, social psychology, self esteem, identity theory
  • The Effects Of Color On Personality And Relationships - 1,132 words
    "The Effects Of Color On Personality And Relationships " "The Effects of Color on Personality and Relationships " Colorado Christian University When dealing with interpersonal relationships people's personalities are a large part of how people get along. When you meet a new person you may say that you "hit it off" or that "you just clicked"; this is due to how each other's personalities coincide with one another's. People's personalities are impacted by there surroundings. This paper will discuss how color affects people's moods and personalities. All people are affected by their surroundings. Emily Landen after a pilgrimage to several third world countries stated, "the children were so maln ...
    Related: personality, relationships, high blood pressure, physical health, blood
  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,190 words
    ... odify behavior. The goal of the therapy is to stimulate cognitive, affective and behavior change. Although the individual is not always fully aware of their specific goal, through analysis of birth order, repeated coping patterns and earliest memories, the psychotherapist infers the goal as a working hypothesis. The client approaches control of feelings and emotions. First, the client recognizes what kind of feeling he or she is having (angriness, sadness, frustration, etc). Once the client sees and knows the feeling; then he or she will try to imagine or think of something pleasant that had happened to him or her, replacing the bad feeling for a good one. By doing this, the client is in ...
    Related: overview, cognitive behavioral, behavior change, conflict resolution, adler
  • Adolescent Abortion - 1,673 words
    ... em. ADOLESCENT ABORTION LEGALIZATION Less then twenty-five years ago, any women who elected to terminate her pregnancy usually had to resort to illegal, unsanitary, and unsafe means. Abortion was frequently considered a criminal offense committed by the woman and the physician performing the procedure. The Supreme Court cases leading to the legalization of abortion began in 1963 with Griswold v. Connecticut. The court invalidated a Connecticut statute that made possession and use of contraceptives by married couples a criminal offense. The case of Griswold was later expanded to encompass the woman's right not only to prevent but also to terminate her pregnancy. In the case of Roe v. Wade ...
    Related: abortion, adolescent, birth control, young woman, fatal
  • African Marriage - 686 words
    African Marriage African Marriage Rites The African marriage rites are very important to the African peoples. The marriage rites are followed strictly and are very traditional. Marriage is the beginning of new life and when two people become one. In African Traditional Religion, marriage is a cherished fecundity and is intended for procreation. Marriage involves not only interpersonal relations but also intercommunity relations. The survival of kinship in the social structure depends on marriage; marriage always establishes very strong bonds between the individuals belonging to different families and clans, especially when children are born. When a community seeks out a wife or a son-in-law, ...
    Related: african, interpersonal relations, social structure, over time, attractiveness
  • Aggression And Its Intricacies - 2,232 words
    ... 19;s quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone wage war against strangers from a different country┘.The overwhelming majority of those who have killed┘have done so as soldiers in war, and we recognize that that has practically nothing to do with the kind of personal aggression that would endanger us as their fellow citizens. (8) Here a regular serving soldier spoke with experience of seeing the numerous soldiers that "[derived] their greatest satisfaction from male companionship, from excitement, and from the conquering of physical obstacles." Those men were most likely part of the 2 percent of combat soldiers (as noted by Swank and Marchandρ ...
    Related: aggression, world war ii, francis galton, human existence, cruel
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • Agression - 2,162 words
    ... in numerous altercations as children. Not as bullies but rather as fighters, the type of person who would not back down once attacked or hurt. This seemed like a strange connection between the type of job and a similarity in childhood activities, because significantly less than a third of school populations engage in fights on a regular basis. This seems to point at a genetic capacity for violence and aggression. More informally, Gwynne Dyer has felt, through his experiences as a soldier, his genes at work as he says; Aggression is certainly part of our genetic makeup, and necessarily so, but the normal human beings quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone ...
    Related: agression, sexual offenders, classical conditioning, aggressive behavior, weapons
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,350 words
    Alcohol Abuse Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative moderate potential for abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and/or anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome (in babies), and/or nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors, then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible mis-use are confusion, disorientation, loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, in ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol
  • Alcoholism - 1,448 words
    ... 100,000 deaths annually in the United States, and although the number shows little sign of declining, the rate per 100,000 population has decreased since the early 1980s. Accidents, mostly due to drunken driving, accounted for 24 percent of these deaths in 1992. Alcohol-related homicide and suicide accounted for 11 and 8 percent. Certain types of cancer that are partly attributable to alcohol, such as those of the esophagus, larynx, and oral cavity, contributed another 17 percent. About 9 percent due to alcohol-related stroke. Many studies have been made about attitudes toward drinking in different societies. Various surveys show that subgroups within a society or culture do not all have ...
    Related: alcoholism, quality of life, social class, interpersonal relations, follow-up
  • Alcoholism - 1,162 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism is perhaps the most common form of drug abuse in America today. In 1995, in the United States 67% of all the population over the age of 12 reported drinking alcohol with in the previous year. Even more astounding, is the fact that nearly 50% reported drinking some type of alcoholic beverage with in the past month. Scientist report that the reason alcohol is so popular to drinkers is because it is pleasant, relaxing, and is considered a "social beverage." But what the drinkers often do not take in to consideration are the facts that alcohol dulls the brain and confuses physical reactions. Which leads to numerous injuries, accidents, and death. Roughly 1.3 million people ...
    Related: alcoholism, social situations, blood alcohol, america today, beverage
  • Anna Karenina - 1,503 words
    Anna Karenina The world of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina is a world ruled by chance. From the very opening chapters, where a watchman is accidentally run over by a train at Moscow's Petersburg station, to the final, climactic scenes of arbitrary destruction when Levin searches for Kitty in a forest beset by lightning, characters are brought together and forced into action against their will by coincidence and, sometimes, misfortune. That Anna and Vronsky ever meet and begin the fateful affair that becomes the centerpiece of the novel is itself a consequence of a long chain of unrelated events: culminating Anna's sharing a berth with Vronsky's mother on her way to reconcile Dolly and Stiva in Mosco ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, immanuel kant, book of deuteronomy
  • Anna Karenina - 1,545 words
    ... else's thoughts, whether occasioned by chalk marks on a leather table cover or by the subtlest nuance in someone's eyes, in contrast to the falsehoods of social language that obscure and separate people, create a few brief and sometime ecstatic moments of penetration between usually separate conciousnesses, a transcending of interpersonal space. And yet words are still the tools by which, literally, men live or die. Levin's search for structure, as mentioned above, may be considered a struggle to find a language of truth. Nowhere is this more evident than in Levin's observation of the sky that occurs first at the end of the mowing scene and then much later in Part VIII, an example both ...
    Related: anna, anna karenina, karenina, tragic hero, cause and effect
  • Are Your Ears Open - 1,163 words
    Are Your Ears Open "Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when you'd have preferred to talk." (Deep and Sussman 76) Upon studying listening within another course, the vast and somewhat unclear subject began to become clearer. The act of listening entails in-depth processes that elude a majority of people's knowledge. The act of listening involves four main parts: hearing, attention, understanding and remembering. Listening entails a vast amount of information that a majority of people does not know or understand. The common view on listening often does not even involve true listening. People often mistake hearing for listening. Just because you heard something does not nec ...
    Related: ears, verbal communication, addison wesley, eastern michigan, utilize
  • Are Your Ears Open - 1,163 words
    Are Your Ears Open? Are your ears open? Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when youd have preferred to talk. (Deep and Sussman 76) Upon studying listening within another course, the vast and somewhat unclear subject began to become clearer. The act of listening entails in-depth processes that elude a majority of peoples knowledge. The act of listening involves four main parts: hearing, attention, understanding and remembering. Listening entails a vast amount of information that a majority of people does not know or understand. The common view on listening often does not even involve true listening. People often mistake hearing for listening. Just because you heard somet ...
    Related: ears, boca raton, verbal communication, long term memory, prentice-hall
  • Arguement On The Provision Of Cable Television On College Campuses - 1,580 words
    Arguement On The Provision Of Cable Television On College Campuses There is a Problem with Having Cable Television on College Campuses Eleven oclock on a Tuesday night, walking through the brightly lit halls, many doors wide open in a dormitory complex on the campus of Bowling Green State University, one can see that the only light that emerges from the open doors is the constantly changing illumination coming from television consoles. Passing from door to door, sounds such as sports cheers, gun shots, screams of people being slain, and moans of woman in ecstasy can be heard. Although many students have the time to watch the television, many of them dont. The televisions utter no words of ma ...
    Related: arguement, cable, cable television, campuses, college campus, college campuses, college life
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