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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: institution

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  • The History Of The Smithsonian Institution And Its Founder, Has Truly Had An Impact On What The Elaborate, Extensive, And Com - 1,521 words
    The history of the Smithsonian Institution and it's founder, has truly had an impact on what the elaborate, extensive, and complete Smithsonian Institution looks like today. The Smithsonian Institution began when James Smithson, an extremely intelligent scientist, was born in 1765. James Smithson was born in the South of France to Sir Hugh Smithson, the Duke of Northumberland, and to Elizabeth Hungerford Keate Macie. Smithson graduated from Oxford in the year 1786. After he graduated, he was accepted to the Royal Society of London group of scientists. Because he discovered the mineral zinc carbonate, it was named after him, Smithsonite. In his will, Smithson left all his money and property t ...
    Related: history, institution, natural history, smithsonian, smithsonian institution
  • The History Of The Smithsonian Institution And Its Founder, Has Truly Had An Impact On What The Elaborate, Extensive, And Com - 1,465 words
    ... reality. Ripley envisioned the Smithsonian as a 'society of scholars,' a 'university without classes.' In other words, he wanted to have vast buildings enclosed with shops, restaurants, and rest areas. He wanted events to entertain and educate the public. To reach these goals, he got another 50 scientists, developed an Office of Education and Training to make programs for students and young professionals. Ripley also extended the evening hours in the galleries and the museums. Luckily, Ripley's plans coincided with those of President Lyndon B. Johnson's plans of "Great Society" programs of the late 1960's. Johnson sought to improve the lives' of all Americans. So, on Ripley's first missi ...
    Related: african american history, american history, history, institution, natural history, smithsonian, smithsonian institution
  • The Media As An Institution - 1,410 words
    THE MEDIA AS AN INSTITUTION ..... it will create forgetfulness in the learners souls because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written words and not remember of themselves. They will appear to be omniscient, and will generally know nothing; they will be tiresome company, having the show of wisdom without the reality. Platos Phaedrus The media has become the institution that it is today because of the associated commercial concerns. Mass media is financed due to the massive influence both the print and electronic media has on Australias society. Whilst Socrates quote from Platos Phaedrus, referred to the invention of writing, many hold the same opinion in relat ...
    Related: electronic media, institution, mass media, media, media industry, print media
  • A Consumer Is Socially Defined As Someone Whom Is Pressured Into Buying Items - 368 words
    1) A consumer is socially defined as someone whom is pressured into buying items forced upon them my capitalist methods. They are also people who believe that if they buy a particular item it will make their lives better. Society has forced consumerism unto people and it has increased over the last century. A consumer was not constructed until the 19th century, when the times emphasized moderation and self-denial. At this time workers were to be frugal and save their money. Most of the time the typical family produced most of what they needed and had few household possessions. The families had little arousal of desire because there were no prepackaged items with brand names and most of the i ...
    Related: buying, consumer, consumer credit, socially, federal government
  • 1984 Abstract - 616 words
    1984 Abstract Book Review of 1984 (5/97) One year before his death in 1950, George Orwell published a book entitled 1984. Since then, the novel has become a bible to people all over the world. The enthusiasm is not only due to the fact that the novel is written so eloquently, and with such foresight, but also because it makes a bold statement about humanity. 1984s main character is Winston Smith, a man who doubts the righteousness of the totalitarian government (Big Brother) that rules Oceania, one of three superstates in the world of 1984. We begin the book with Winston, and learn that Big Brother is quite fictional. The government has developed its own language, is at constant war with the ...
    Related: 1984, abstract, book review, george orwell, stark
  • 19th Century Settlement - 799 words
    19th Century settlement In the early 1800s a number of French explorers visited the south west coast of Australia. The British, who were at war with the French at that time, became concerned that a French presence in the south west of the continent could endanger trade with the eastern colonies. In 1819 Phillip Parker King and his crew patrolled the southwest, although it was not until his second voyage in 1822 that they made landfall on "Rottenest. Settlement of the Swan River Colony began in 1829, and interest was shown almost immediately in Rottnest as a secure place with the potential for salt harvesting, farming and fishing. Rottnest was surveyed with provision for a town in 1830, and i ...
    Related: settlement, physical development, state government, west coast, drowned
  • A Boy Of Scotchirish Descent, Whose Ancestors Had Settled In Pennsylvania Before Travelling Through Mountains To Resettle In - 530 words
    A boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose ancestors had settled in Pennsylvania before travelling through mountains to resettle in southern territory, he was born in 1782 in the Abbeville district of South Carolina on March 18. His family was not rich, nor were they poor; they owned slaves and were regarded not as a part of the ostentation associated with slave-holding at the time but rather as a simple, farm family. His father had an interest in politics and participated locally, something that ultimately catapulted this boy into his future profession. Sent at the age of 12 to live with a Presbyterian minister for a basic education, he was eventually trained at Yale beginning his junior year and ...
    Related: ancestors, mountains, pennsylvania, travelling, fundamental principles
  • A Chapter Of My Life - 771 words
    A Chapter of My Life "God helps those who help themselves." This sounds like a simple passage from a religious book, but it has an overwhelming significance in my life. This phrase is greatly responsible for building self- esteem and confidence in me. It can also be credited for transforming a shy, introverted, and confused boy into a very confident and enlightened adult. I neither read the phrase from a book nor heard it at a religious service. I heard these words from someone who really understands the meaning of the phrase. That person's name is Ameet Handa. Ameet is suffering from multiple disabilities. I met him at the institution for the Disabled People in New Delhi, India, where I was ...
    Related: self esteem, first week, high school, confident, adult
  • A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights - 448 words
    A Comparsion Between Modern Day Soilders And Medieval Knights In Medieval Times, A Knight was a mounted man-at-arms of medieval Europe. He served a king or other feudal superior, usually in return for the tenure of a tract of land, but sometimes he served his lord for money. The knight was generally a man of noble birth who had served in the lower ranks as page and squire before being ceremoniously inducted into knighthood by his superior. At his induction the knight usually swore to be brave, loyal, and courteous and to protect the defenseless. After the 15th century, knighthood was conferred on civilians as a reward for public services. A knight in armor would present a very strange appear ...
    Related: knights, medieval, medieval europe, medieval times, modern warfare, the knight
  • A Current Look At Japans Financial And Political Risk - 992 words
    A Current Look at Japans Financial and Political Risk A global company faces a number of different types of risks-economic, legal, political, and competitive. The nature and severity of such risks are not the same for all countries. A global company is in a position to manage such risks effectively by planning and implementing strategies aimed at diffusing risk. By keeping a breast of news-breaking developments, and not easily forgetting the past, an international company will have the ability to achieve successful use of strategic risk management in the global business environment. In the past five years, much to their disgrace, Japan has fell victim to numerous financial scandals. In addit ...
    Related: financial institution, financial management, financial market, financial risk, financial system, political risk, risk management
  • A Global War Or An Intercontinental Nuclear Exchange Is Highly Unlikely In The Current World Political Climate But As Long As - 1,605 words
    A global war or an intercontinental nuclear exchange is highly unlikely in the current world political climate. But as long as considerable nuclear weapons and long range delivery systems exist in other countries and a developing threat resides with potential adversaries, the possibility of an aerospace attack on North America cannot be discounted. Furthermore, the proliferation of cruise and ballistic missiles, and weapons of mass destruction, has made the post-Cold War world more, rather than less, dangerous. New generations of these weapons may be in the hands of governments or organizations which could threaten the North American continent, or American and Canadian military personnel dep ...
    Related: climate, intercontinental, nuclear, nuclear weapons, political climate
  • A Living Organization Changes With Time Some Parts Of It May Remain Identical To That Which Was First Constructed Most Parts - 1,785 words
    A living organization changes with time. Some parts of it may remain identical to that which was first constructed. Most parts will adapt to changes in the world, in society, and in mankind itself. If it does not change, it withers and dies. Organizations which fail to adapt to changes, whether they like it or not, tend to become shrunken relics of their original selves. They become mummified images of a once living creation. Such an organization is the Ku Klux Klan, better known as the KKK. The Ku Klux Klan is one of the most hateful groups that still exists today. They are not as strong as they once were, but still pose a threat. I believe that the KKK should have never been formed because ...
    Related: identical, north carolina, after world, small town, threatening
  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,022 words
    ... e power to regulate trade, the southern states would be nothing more than overseers for the Northern States. On August 21 the debate over the issue of commerce became very closely linked to another explosive issue--slavery. When Martin of Maryland proposed a tax on slave importation, the convention was thrust into a strident discussion of the institution of slavery and its moral and economic relationship to the new government. Rutledge of South Carolina, asserting that slavery had nothing at all to do with morality, declared, Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. Sherman of Connecticut was for dropping the tender issue altogether before it jeopardized the convention. Ma ...
    Related: more perfect union, articles of confederation, bill of rights, northern states, mason
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,339 words
    A Reaction To Uncle Tom's Cabin Lauren Richmond History 201 April 1, 1999 A Reaction to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin "So this is the little lady who made this big war." Abraham Lincoln's legendary comment upon meeting Harriet Beecher Stowe demonstrates the significant place her novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, holds in American history. Published in book form in 1852, the novel quickly became a national bestseller and stirred up strong emotions in both the North and South. The context in which Uncle Tom's Cabin was written, therefore, is just as significant as the actual content. Among other things, Stowe's publication of her novel was stimulated by the increasing tensions among the na ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,386 words
    ... ill a young boy, his father sold Uncle Tom to the slave trader Mr. Haley. Growing up on a southern plantation, George naturally inherited the slave-owning tradition of his culture. When he found the beaten and dying Uncle Tom, however, his perception immediately changed and he vowed to "do what one man can to drive out this curse of slavery from my land! (p.455)" It was George who buried Uncle Tom, and he then returned home to free all of his own slaves. George was an admirable character because he demonstrated growth and integrity and illustrated that the inveterate rationalization of slave-owning was one that was not immutable. I also feel that the character of Mr. Wilson is one that c ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • A Slaves Life - 1,645 words
    A Slave's Life Imagine, if you will, rising earlier than the sun, eating a mere "snack"- lacking essentially all nutritional value - and trekking miles to toil in the unforgiving climate of the southern states, and laboring until the sun once again slipped under the horizon. Clad only in the rags your master provided (perhaps years ago), you begin walking in the dark the miles to your "home." As described by the writers Jacob Stroyer and Josiah Henson, this "home" was actually a mere thatched roof, that you built with your own hands, held up by pathetic walls, over a dirt floor and you shared this tiny space with another family. Upon return to "home," once again you eat the meager rations yo ...
    Related: slave labor, created equal, founding fathers, significant other, livestock
  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
    Related: blanche dubois, breakdown, named desire, psychological, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,095 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire While it can be argued that all of the characters in Tennese Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire are living in an illusion, I do not think that all the characters are living an unreal existence, however some are, in particular Blanche, Stella and Stanley. Blanch, to some extent, is living in her own fantasy world plagued with delusions and outbursts. It is quite obvious that she is living an illusion. Stella is living an unreal existence in regards to the way in which she likes to pretend she is living in a happy home. Stanley is also, however to a much lesser extent, living an unreal existence. He is very self-centered and towards the end he seems to be living ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, upper class
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 782 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire A Streetcar Named Desire Tennessee Williams is known for his powerfully written psychological dramas. Most of his works are set in the southern United States and they usually portray neurotic people who are victims of their own passions, frustrations, and loneliness. The play represents the conflict between the sensitive, neurotic Blanche DuBois and the crude, animalistic Stanley Kowalski. Blanche visits the home of her sister, Stella, in New Orleans and that is when Stanley started picking at her, almost testing her. Before she had met Stanley, she told her sister of how their plantation had been lost due to the costs of paying for the funerals of many family member ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, stanley kowalski
  • A Universal Perspective On Belief: - 1,897 words
    A Universal Perspective On Belief: A Universal Perspective on Belief: A Response to Pragmatic and Cartesian Approaches to Epistemology By Britta Rempel (*note to reader:I hope this gives all of you struggling with some concepts in Intro to Philosophy a clearer view on how to approach your own paper, please do not plagerise) The approaches given by Pierce and Nagel to the epistemological questions of doubt and belief, though diverse in that they are strictly pragmatist and Cartesian, contain a similar underlying principle. They both serve to show that belief cannot come from any source that appeals to one's feelings or purposes, experiences or impressions. Beliefs must arise from a non-person ...
    Related: fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol syndrome, illegal drug, empiricism, stability
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