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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: insomnia

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  • Insomnia - 915 words
    Insomnia Insomnia Insomnia comes in many forms and worries people of all ages, most commonly for just a night or two, but sometimes for weeks, months, and even years. Insomnia has many causes. Insomnia is a symptom, much like fever or stomachache. There three symptoms commonly shown by people who have insomnia: difficulty falling asleep, no problem falling asleep but difficulty staying asleep with many awakenings, and waking up too early. Difficulty sleeping at night may be related with the following daytime symptoms: sleepiness, anxiety, impaired memory, impaired concentration, and irritability. There are three basic types of insomnia. The first type is called transient insomnia -- lasting ...
    Related: insomnia, weight loss, sleep disorders, prescription drugs, misuse
  • Insomnia - 381 words
    Insomnia Insomnia is a sleeping disorder enabling people to fall asleep. It is a relatively common disorder that can affect people of all ages for varying amounts of time. Usually its effects last for only a few nights, but it is possible for the symptoms to continue for months and even years. It can be caused by several factors like psychiatric problems, persistent stress, use of stimulants or alcohol, a lack of exercise, excessive noise or light, and certain physical illnesses. Insomnia is not defined by the number of hours of sleep a person gets or how long it takes to fall asleep. Individuals vary normally in their need for, and their satisfaction with, sleep. Insomnia may cause problems ...
    Related: insomnia, short term, falls short, sleep disorders, illness
  • Insomnia - 1,604 words
    Insomnia Insomnia is a common sleep disorder that plagues millions of people around the globe by not allowing them to sleep. Its severity can range between a couple of days to a couple of months, and is curable in most cases. In any given year, about one-third of all adults suffer from insomnia (Hendrickson 1). Insomnia itself is not a disease, but a symptom of an underlying mental or physical condition of the person. There is not a strict definition for insomnia, but it could be narrowed down to: a person not being able to sleep, having difficulty falling to sleep, or having trouble staying asleep. Medications are available for the treatment of insomnia, but they should not be used on a reg ...
    Related: insomnia, on the road, short term, waking life, patience
  • Insomnia - 1,446 words
    Insomnia Lying among tousled sheets, eluded by sleep with thoughts racing, many people wrestle with the nightly demon named insomnia. Insomnia is defined as, the perception or complaint of inadequate or poor-quality sleep because of one or more of the following: difficulty falling asleep, waking up frequently during the night with difficulty returning to sleep, waking up too early in the morning, or unrefreshing sleep (Rajput 1431). Because the definition of "poor-quality sleep" is not the same for every person, it is not easy to determine the frequency and severity of it's occurrence (Holbrook 216). To add to the complexity of this problem, there is not even one universal treatment that can ...
    Related: insomnia, cognitive therapy, biological clock, short term, falling
  • Insomnia - 1,289 words
    Insomnia In this research paper I will attempt to familiarize you, the reader, on the role of sleep, health risks of sleeping disorder that is most common, Insomnia. I will give you some of the aspects which cause Insomnia and how it can be treated. We human beings spend one third of our lives in a mysterious, potentially dangerous and seemingly unproductive state of unconsciousness---and no one knows exactly why. Scientists have attempted to study the effects of sleep and its role on our existence but have yet to come up with an accurate reason why we need sleep. Yes, we do need sleep. All animals, be they mammal, amphibian, aquatic, etc., need some form of sleep in order to rejuvenate thei ...
    Related: insomnia, mind and body, important role, sleep patterns, diabetes
  • Insomnia - 1,234 words
    ... rks and wakes them as they are first falling asleep. Almost any sleeping pill, if taken continuously, will cause insomnia. Sleep can be affected by ones individual differences, prior sleep history, circadian rhythms, drugs, life styles, and psychopathology. Caffeine and nicotine are both central nervous system stimulants, and as such are sleep-disrupting substances. Insomnia can also be due to poor eating habits, caffeine, and lack of exercise. Medications that are prescribed bed for sleep can disrupt or eliminate the sleep are: Doral, Halcion. Restoril , valium, and Xanax. Antihistamines can also cause sleep depravation. Vitamins and minerals such as B6, niacin amide, calcium, magnesium ...
    Related: insomnia, mental health, sleep patterns, economic status, flower
  • Insomnia - 455 words
    Insomnia Ralph Roberts is an old man who lives in Derry, Maine (USA). He has a problem : he can't sleep. Every morning he keeps waking up earlier; 3:15...3:02...2:45, and he can't go back to sleep once he wakes up. Then he starts to have hallucina- tions, he can see auras. Since his wife died this problem started. Then he sees that his neighbour, and good friend, Ed Deepneau, has gone mental and that he beats the hell out of his wife Helen. Ed keeps telling Ralph that the Krimson King will destroy the baby-killers and that Ralph shouldn't get involved. One night Ralph was sitting in the dark, and suddenly he saw 2 bald doctors with scissors coming up to a neighbours'house and they have a gol ...
    Related: insomnia, doctor who, higher level, helen, random
  • Insomnia - 1,061 words
    Insomnia Insomnia is caused by everyday situations involving emotional extremes of happiness or anxiety. Although the term insomnia literally translates into no sleep, it is used by most people to describe trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. The consequence of this is being unable to function as well as usual the following day. About one in three American adults says he or she is a poor sleeper and one in six says the problem is quite serious. Insomnia knows no bounds it can affect the young and old male or female. Sleep specialists distinguish among three types of insomnia: transient, short term and chronic. Transient insomnia is the experience of a night or two of poor sleep. Probabl ...
    Related: insomnia, prescription drugs, family life, school work, spoon
  • Abortion Is A Subject Of Perception To Find A Clear Cut Solution Would Be To Commit Suicide Doctors Say That Candy Is Not Bad - 1,958 words
    Abortion is a subject of perception; to find a clear cut solution would be to commit suicide. Doctors say that candy is not bad, so long as there is not a consumption of it at one time. All things in life must be viewed through a reasonable, clear mind. To say abortion is good or bad is to look at it blindly. Abortion is not like racism or oppression where to look at one incident is to miss the point. Or if we look at the big picture we see the crime, and abuse. Abortion is by far a twentieth century invention or discovery, the only thing modern about abortions is the procedure. During the time of ancient Greece and Rome there have been writings of abortions. Abortions may be dangerous no, b ...
    Related: abortion, candy, perception, suicide, ancient greece
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,104 words
    ... oved by God who has a distinct plan for their lives. It denies the child the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. "God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark." Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86 ...
    Related: abortion, human nature, moral responsibility, senate judiciary committee, rage
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,093 words
    ... the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark. Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86% had increased tendency toward anger or rage. 53% increased or began use ...
    Related: abortion, online available, united states senate, pro-life movement, minute
  • Adhd: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments For Illness - 1,232 words
    Adhd: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments For Illness ADHD: Parents Should Use Alternative Treatments for Illness A child named Alva comes to mind. Alva's teacher taught by rote, which was too mechanical for the boy's creative mind. His thoughts often wandered, while his body seemed in perpetual motion in his seat. The teacher found Alva, inattentive and unruly and often threatened punishment. Alva, fearful and out of place, ran away from school (Robbins 2). The preceding quote is an example of a student that lived many years ago that would most likely be diagnosed today with ADHD. There is an increasing debate on the subject of using prescription drugs to treat the condition of Attent ...
    Related: illness, medical news, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, high blood pressure, medicalization
  • Alcoholism And Sleep - 1,609 words
    Alcoholism And Sleep The Effects of Alcohol on Sleep Many people usually associate alcohol with sleep and sleepiness. However, the effects of alcohol on sleep are mostly negative ones, and these two things should not be interrelated at all. In order to understand how these two things are related, one must explore the depths of two different topics: alcohol and sleep. With this knowledge, one can begin to understand how alcohol and sleep are related and what effects alcohol has on sleep. Sleep is a very active process, just like consciousness. Sleep is controlled largely by nerve centers in the lower brain stem, where the base of the brain joins the spinal cord. It is here where certain nerve ...
    Related: alcoholism, sleep apnea, sleep deprivation, sleep patterns, older persons
  • Allergies - 1,744 words
    Allergies An allergy is an abnormal reaction to ordinarily harmless substance or substances. These sensitizing substances, called allergens, may be inhaled, swallowed or come into contact with the skin. When an allergen is absorbed into the body it triggers white blood cells to produce IgE antibodies. These antibodies attach themselves to mast cells causing release of potent chemical mediators such as histamine, causing typical allergic symptoms. A person who has allergies doesnt have a poor immune system, rather an over protective one. Their immune system fights the allergen when it comes in contact with it even though the allergen isnt harmful. To diagnose allergies a physician will clean ...
    Related: high blood pressure, blood sugar, weight gain, sensitive, remove
  • Alzheimers Disease Is A Progressive Degenerative Disease Of The Brain That Causes Increasing Loss Of Memory And Other Mental - 564 words
    Alzheimers disease is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain that causes increasing loss of memory and other mental abilities. The disease attacks few people before age sixty, but it occurs in about twenty percent of people who live to age eighty-five. The disease is named after the German psychiatrist and neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer, who first described its effects on brain cells in 1907. Symptoms of Alzheimers disease come in three stages: early, late, and advanced. Early stages include forgetfulness of recent events, increasing difficulty in performing intellectual tasks such as accustomed work, balancing a checkbook or maintaining a household. Also, personality changes, inc ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, brain, progressive, personal hygiene
  • Amphetaminesmethamphetamines - 772 words
    Amphetamines/Methamphetamines Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Amphetamines/Methamphetamines The medical use of amphetamines was common in the 1950/60's when they were used to help cure depression and to help the user lose weight. An amphetamine is a drug that is a stimulant to the central nervous system. Amphetamines are colorless and may be inhaled, injected, or swallowed. Amphetamines are also used non-medically to avoid sleep, improve athletic performance, or to counter the effects of depressant drugs. Amphetamines are addictive. Because of this, when the user discontinues use or reduces the amount that they use, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some withdrawal s ...
    Related: long term effects, south korea, physical activity, addictive, smoke
  • Anorexia - 1,543 words
    Anorexia It would seem today that eating disorders are on the rise. While this may be true, the numbers may appear to grow only because more cases are being brought out into the open. One interpretation of an eating disorder is termed as a relationship between the person and food that appears abnormal. Anorexia Nervosa is one of the most prevalent eating disorder diseases. The word Anorexia itself means, "lack of appetite," and as for the definition of Anorexia, Anorexia is an all encompassing pursuit of thinness, occurring most often in adolescents and young adult women. This is accomplished by avoidance of eating by any means possible. The person affected by Anorexia has an absolutely terr ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, blood pressure, fashion industry, relief
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,600 words
    Anorexia Nervosa In American society women are given the message starting from a very young age that in order to be successful and happy, they must be thin. Eating disorders are on the rise, it is not surprising given the value which society places on being thin. Television and magazine advertising that show the image of glamorous and thin model are everywhere. Thousands of teenage girls are starving themselves daily in an effort to attain what the fashion industry considers to be the "ideal" figure. An average female model weighs 23% less than the recommended weight for a woman. Maintaining a weight 20% below your expected body weight fits the criteria for the emotional eating disorder know ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, nervosa, blood sugar
  • Aromatherapy - 1,357 words
    Aromatherapy There are literally hundreds of types of unconventional medicines. An unconventional medicine is any type of therapy that is different from traditional medicine in the way that it focuses on a patients mind, body, and inner energy, to aid in healing. Some, use magic charms, colour therapy, sound therapy, and juice therapy, in which natural juices are used as tonic therapies. Flower remedy is a system of natural medicine that uses remedies distilled from blooming plants and trees, and some followers believe that flowers are natures gentle tools for treating and preventing disease. (Gottlieb,1995:37) There is even a healing process called food therapy. It involves a healthy diet a ...
    Related: aromatherapy, new mexico, american medical, alternative medicine, teas
  • Aromatherapy - 1,332 words
    ... medies for headaches. It can be applied as a compress, or straight- one or two drops directly to the back of the neck. A significant reduction in pain, as well as positive mood change, and noticeable performance improvement was seen in aromatherapy patients in a large experiment in 1990. (Earle & Rose,1996) Natural remedies are said to increase the bodys resistance to disease by improving its ability to fight infection. No single essential oil will heal a person, but many plants have immune modulating properties. (Rosenfeld,1996:45) Essential oils should not be solely relied upon in cases of serious illnesses, but may be integrated into any therapeutic program such as physiotherapy, or m ...
    Related: aromatherapy, chinese medicine, human body, immune system, prentice-hall
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