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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: antoine

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  • Antoine Lavoisier 17431794 Antoinelaurent Lavoisier Lah Vwah Zyay Was One Of The - 879 words
    Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (lah vwah ZYAY) was one of the best-known French scientists and was an important government official. His theories of combustion, his development of a way to classify the elements and the first modern textbook of chemistry led to his being known as the father of modern chemistry. He contributed to much of the research in the field of chemistry. He is quoted for saying, Nothing is lost, nothing is created, everything is transformed. Lavoisier was born in Paris, France on Aug. 26, 1743. When he was eleven years old he attended a college called Mazain. For Lavoisier's last two years in college he found a great deal of interest in science. ...
    Related: antoine, antoine lavoisier, lavoisier, paris france, french academy
  • Scene 1: Antoine Tells Jamal About His Dream Antoine Tells Jamal That Nita Is Dead Jamal Goes To A Drug Dealer To Get Coke So - 674 words
    Scene 1: Antoine tells Jamal about his dream. Antoine tells Jamal that Nita is dead. Jamal goes to a drug dealer to get coke so he could kill himself by overdose. (Enters Antoine) Jamal: Hey wasup Antoine. Antoine: Jamal I gotta tell you something. I had a dream about Nita last night. Jamal: (furiously) why you dreamin bout my girl!? Antoine: No, it aint even like that. Jamal: (Furiously) Then What! Antoine: Yeah. I dreamed she was dead. Jamal: Dead! What you mean dead? Antoine: I mean she dead. Jamal: (in denial) aint no way. I was with her two days ago. No man, you gotta be lying. Antoine: I saw her uncontious with my own two eyes. She aint alive no more. You can see for yourself. Jamal: S ...
    Related: antoine, coke, dealer, dream, jamal
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,771 words
    ... t Joe requires her total submission [. . .] she retains a clear perception of herself and her situation that becomes her salvation in the end" (Wall 386). Initiating the process of stepping outside of herself and assessing her situation is the impetus for Janie to finally act in ways to improve her life. Joe's restriction "short circuits Janie's attempt to claim an identity of her own, robs her of the opportunity to negotiate respect from her peers. 'So gradually, she pressed her teeth together and learned to hush,'" but not for long (Wall 386). Finally, Janie steps up and initiates a new attitude. In her first confrontation with Joe, she declares that "Ah knows uh few things, and womenf ...
    Related: awakening, final phase, self assessment, book reports, absolute
  • Beethoven, Berloiz, And Chopin - 1,384 words
    Beethoven, Berloiz, And Chopin Beethoven, Berlioz and Chopin Beethoven Beethoven was born in Bonn, Germany in 1770 to Johann van Beethoven and his wife, Maria Magdalena. He took his first music lessons from his father, who was tenor in the choir of the archbishop-elector of Cologne. His father was an unstable, yet ambitious man whose excessive drinking, rough temper and anxiety surprisingly did not diminish Beethoven's love for music. He studied and performed with great success, despite becoming the breadwinner of his household by the time he was 18 years old. His father's increasingly serious alcohol problem and the earlier death of his grandfather in 1773 sent his family into deepening pov ...
    Related: chopin, hector berlioz, good friends, medical school, bonn
  • Blaise Pascal - 675 words
    Blaise Pascal Grade 11 Math Essay - Blaise Pascal by Toni Lintunen Introduction Blaise Pascal was born on June 19, 1623 in Clermont Ferrand. His nationality was french. He died in 1662. He was credited for his imaginative and subtle work in geometry and other branches of mathematics. His work influenced later generations of theologians and philosophers, helping make mathematics what it is today. Blaise Pascal is considered part of the foundation of the very heart of mathematics. History At age 12 he mastered Euclid's Elements. In 1645, he invented and sold the first adding machine. His study of hydrostatics led to the invention of the syringe and hydraulic press. At age 16, he formulated the ...
    Related: blaise pascal, pascal, theoretical physics, religious experience, pseudonym
  • Blaise Pascal - 1,504 words
    Blaise Pascal Blaise Pascal was born in Clermont France on June 19, 1623 to Etienne Pascal. His mother died when he was only 3. He was the third of four children and the only boy. He was described as a man of: small stature, poor health, loud spoken, somewhat overbearing, precious, stubbornly persevering, a perfectionist, highly pugnacious yet seeking to be humble and meek. Pascal's father had somewhat unorthodox views on education, so he decided to teach his son himself. He forbade any mathematic teachings or material to be given to him and had any such texts removed from their house. Blaise became engulfed with curiosity due to this rule. He started to work with geometry on his own at the ...
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  • Charles Dickens 2 - 481 words
    Charles Dickens 2 Charles Dickens has been acclaimed as one of the foremost satirists of the nineteenth century. In his novel A Tale of Two Cities Dickens finds fault with the social structure of the society. A few of these social problems are the difference between the classes, the lunacy of the revolution, and the judicial system in effect as this time. The first of the faults in the social structure of the society is the difference between the classes. It is not just the difference between the poor and rich but also between the rich and the royalty. While Monsieur the Marquis is driving through St. Antoine, he runs over a child. All he does is toss a few gold coins out to the father and d ...
    Related: charles darnay, charles dickens, nineteenth century, social structure, sawyer
  • Chemical Reactions - 1,932 words
    Chemical Reactions Chemical reactions are the heart of chemistry. People have always known that they exist. The Ancient Greeks were the firsts to speculate on the composition of matter. They thought that it was possible that individual particles made up matter. Later, in the Seventeenth Century, a German chemist named Georg Ernst Stahl was the first to postulate on chemical reaction, specifically, combustion. He said that a substance called phlogiston escaped into the air from all substances during combustion. He explained that a burning candle would go out if a candle snuffer was put over it because the air inside the snuffer became saturated with phlogiston. According to his ideas, wood is ...
    Related: nineteenth century, seventeenth century, eighteenth century, urge, combustion
  • Chemical Reactions - 390 words
    Chemical Reactions Chemical reactions are the heart of chemistry. People have always known that they exist. The Ancient Greeks were the first to speculate on the composition of matter. They thought that it was possible that individual particles made up matter. Later, in the Seventeenth Century, a German chemist named George Ernst Stahl was the first to postulate on chemical reaction. He said that a substance called phlogiston escaped into the air from all substances during combustion. He explained that a burning candle would go out if a candle snuffer was put over it because the air inside the snuffer became saturated with phlogiston. Stahl also said that phlogiston will take away from a sub ...
    Related: john dalton, eighteenth century, different types, classify, burning
  • Cinematic Technique - 739 words
    Cinematic Technique Nicholas Gamino Cinematic Techniques The extraordinary film The 400 Blows (Francois Truffaut, 1959) skillfully uses cinematic devices appropriately within the context of the theme. Part of the underlying theme of this movie as explained by Truffaut himself is, "... to portray a child as honestly as possible..."(Writing About Film, 1982). It is the scenes in this movie that are most helpful in disclosing the overall theme of the film. Within the scenes, the camera angles in this film play an important role in accentuating the emotions behind the scene. The camera angles used in this film will be the primary focus of this paper. The high angle shots utilized in The 400 Blow ...
    Related: cinematic, technique, school teacher, important role, appropriately
  • Condorcet - 261 words
    Condorcet Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas de Caritat, better known as Marquis de Condorcet, was born in Ribemont, Paris. He studied at Jesuit schools and the college de Navarre and later became a French philosppher, political leader, and mathmatician. He published a book titled Essai sur le calcul integral and in 1769 he was elected to the Academie des Sciences. He was very fasinated by probality and the philosophy of mathematics and this is where most of his famous work evolved from. He wrote Essay on the Application of Analysis to the Probabilty Majority Decisions which was very important work in the development of probablity. Condorcet was very opposed to the church and to show his opinions on ...
    Related: condorcet, human race, french revolution, legislative assembly, navarre
  • Dupont An Investment Analysis - 1,074 words
    DuPont An investment analysis DuPont makes a variety of high-value products for industry today, including polymers, chemicals, fibers, and petroleum products...products for agriculture, electronics, transportation, apparel, food, aerospace, construction, and health care. DuPont serves customers in these and other industries every day, offering "better things for better living" as the company prepares to begin its third century of scientific, technological, commercial, and social achievement. DuPont is a research and technology based chemical and energy company with its annual revenue exceeding $39 billion. Eleuthre Irne du Pont de Nemours, a French immigrant, established DuPont in 1802 in a ...
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  • Ernest Rutherford - 747 words
    Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford was born in New Zealand in 1871 as one of 12 children. It was Rutherford who first "split" an atom and who discovered the atomic "nucleus", a name that he invented. For this he is regarded as the greatest experimental physicist of his time. Rutherford was one of the first and most important researchers in nuclear physics. Soon after the discovery of radioactivity in 1986 by the French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel, Rutherford discovered the three different types of radiation. By covering his Uranium with thin foils of aluminum, gradually increasing the number of foils. For the first three layers of foil the radiation escaping from the uranium decreased ...
    Related: ernest, ernest rutherford, rutherford, westminster abbey, nuclear physics
  • Ernest Rutherford - 747 words
    Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford was born in New Zealand in 1871 as one of 12 children. It was Rutherford who first "split" an atom and who discovered the atomic "nucleus", a name that he invented. For this he is regarded as the greatest experimental physicist of his time. Rutherford was one of the first and most important researchers in nuclear physics. Soon after the discovery of radioactivity in 1986 by the French physicist Antoine Henri Becquerel, Rutherford discovered the three different types of radiation. By covering his Uranium with thin foils of aluminum, gradually increasing the number of foils. For the first three layers of foil the radiation escaping from the uranium decreased ...
    Related: ernest, ernest rutherford, rutherford, nuclear weapons, different types
  • French Nationalism - 1,440 words
    French Nationalism French and English Clashes in the first decade of the nineteenth century & the Birth of French-Canadian Nationalism For nearly two centuries the inhabitants of New France lived their day to day lives under the French Regime. The colony of New France was shaped by such institutions as the Catholic Church, and the seigneural system. After the Conquest of 1763, the inhabitants of New France now found themselves under the control of the British monarch. However, the life for the inhabitants of New France, virtually remained unchanged. It was not until the American Revolution, that the inhabitants of New France began to feel the British presence. As a result of the American Rev ...
    Related: french canadian, french canadians, nationalism, new france, political system
  • French New Wave - 1,238 words
    French New Wave The French New Wave was a movement that lasted between 1959 to 1964. It all started with the Cinematheque Francois, an underground organization that would regularly show older films from around the world. This beget the cine-club, and by the 1954 there were 100,000 members in 200 clubs. From these clubs several magazines were created, the most famous of these were LEcran Francois, La Revue du Cinema, Postif, and the world known Cahiers du Cinema. One of the two most influential people during this time was Alexandre Astruc who declared that, the cinema is becoming a means of expression like the other arts before it, especially painting and the novel. It is no longer a spectacl ...
    Related: wave, german expressionism, love story, francois truffaut, nazi
  • History Of Chemistry - 1,607 words
    History Of Chemistry History of Chemistry Introduction: Humans have always been very curios creatures. The have always wondered about what they are and why they are here. Our limited knowledge of the environment has always urged for new things to be discovered. The desire to understand the world better has made people search for rational answers, for principles and laws. For centuries people have tried to unlock the mysterious world that surrounds them. History: Because myths did not explain things well enough the Greeks began to ask questions about the world around them. They did this so thoroughly and so brilliantly that the era between 600 and 400 B.C. is called the golden age of philosop ...
    Related: chemistry, history, modern chemistry, little book, golden age
  • History Of Physics - 1,315 words
    History Of Physics Physics began when man first started to study his surroundings. Early applications of physics include the invention of the wheel and of primitive weapons. The people who built Stone Henge had knowledge of physical mechanics in order to move the rocks and place them on top of each other. It was not until during the period of Greek culture that the first systematic treatment of physics started with the use of mechanics. Thales is often said to have been the first scientist, and the first Greek philosopher. He was an astronomer, merchant and mathematician, and after visiting Egypt he is said to have originated the science of deductive geometry. He also discovered theorems of ...
    Related: history, physics, soviet union, isaac newton, american
  • Hydrogen - 1,153 words
    Hydrogen Hydrogen in its liquid form has been used in space vehicles for years. Hydrogen has a high combustion energy per pound relative to any other fuel, meaning hydrogen is more efficient on a weight basis than fuels currently used in air or ground transportation. Hydrogen is the universes most abundant element. Most of that hydrogen though, is tied up in chemical bonds. Hydrogen can exist in either a gaseous form or a liquid form. Hydrogen is The liquid form is usually used for storage while the gaseous form is used as a heat transfer, and also as a cooling agent in nuclear power plants. The name hydrogen is Greek for water former. Hydrogen was once called "inflammable air" by a British ...
    Related: hydrogen, nuclear power, space exploration, power plants, francis
  • Hydrogen - 638 words
    HYDROGEN Hydrogen, symbol H, is reactive, colorless, odorless, and tasteless gaseous element. The atomic number of hydrogen is 1. The element is usually classed in group 1 of the periodic table. Hydrogen was confused with other gases until the a British chemist demonstrated in 1766 that it was evolved by the action of sulfuric acid on metals and also showed at a later date that it was an independent substance that combined with oxygen to form water. The British chemist Joseph Priestley named the gas "inflammable air" in 1781, and the French chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier renamed it hydrogen. Like most gaseous elements, hydrogen is diatomic, but it becomes and turns into free atoms at high ...
    Related: hydrogen, periodic table, melting point, carbon monoxide, laurent
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