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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: inherently

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  • Are Humans Inherently Evil - 459 words
    Are Human's Inherently Evil A great man once remarked "All men are created equal". Well that observation was correct, except that mankind is only equal in the eyes of moral judgment. Here I will show how man is inherently evil, but not at his request. There can be a wide spectrum of emotions that mankind can display, but these days the dominant traits are greed and hatred. Emotions and environmental stimuli dictate our actions. Every action we display has been impacted upon by some other outside force, be it another person or how your day is going. Deep down people have to desire to be good, but the evil inside us all always finds a way to burrow to the top. For millennia man has fought his ...
    Related: inherently, financial stability, chelsea house, public policy, choosing
  • The Question Of Being: What It Is, Why It Matters - 1,317 words
    "The Question Of Being": What It Is, Why It Matters. Martin Heidegger attempts to answer the "question of Being" by appealing to the terminology and methodology of Dasein, most commonly defined as existence. Dasein is not simply any kind of existence, however, but an existence that is unique from all other existences in that it asks the question of existence while existing in the existence itself. In other words, one must first understand Dasein in order to understand Being because Dasein is a kind of being that is concerned about its very Being. Contrary to the popular opinion that in order to truly and clearly comprehend any phenomenon, the subject which interrogates must necessarily stand ...
    Related: thomas aquinas, martin heidegger, true meaning, reflective, disclosure
  • A Clockwork Orange - 255 words
    A Clockwork Orange Many of us like to think that humanity as a whole is progressing to a better future where we will live united and in peace with one another. Nevertheless, there are those among us that do not share these beliefs. In A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, a futuristic world is turned upside down and in shambles. This 1962 classic is a frightful depiction of what our society could become and possibly, what it already is. Drugs almost seem to be legal and unregulated and subsequently are widely used. The prison system is overcrowded with young punk criminals who are inherently evil with no regard for humanity, or any part of society for that matter. Youth take over the stree ...
    Related: a clockwork orange, clockwork, clockwork orange, orange, anthony burgess
  • A World Of Diversity - 614 words
    A World of Diversity Ethnocentric, derived from the Greek words of Ethnos, meaning race, people or cultural group, and Kentrikos, meaning concentrated about or directed to a center is a word that greatly describes many cultures on this planet we call Earth . The official definition of Ethnocentric is " characterized or based on the attitude that ones own group is superior" or "having race as a central interest". There is a whole world of problems, politics, and, other cultures, but it seems that the average Americans only interest is that of themselves. The reason I chose to focus more on the American being ethnocentric is because I have been exposed the most to this culture. Why is it that ...
    Related: diversity, world politics, world view, foreign countries, simon fraser university
  • Abortion - 1,138 words
    Abortion Abortion has been one of the topics of hot debate for the last three decades in our nation. Since the Roe v/s Wade decision in 1973, some Americans feel the need to ponder whether aborting fetuses is a moral action. On the one hand, some people feel that abortion should be legal because a woman has a right to choose whether she wants to continue a pregnancy or not. It's her body. On the other hand, some feel that fetuses have no advocates and deserve a right to live, so it is immoral to abandon their rights and kill them. This issue is not only at the center of political debate, but philosophical debate as well. In this paper, I will examine and critique Mary Anne Warren's On the Mo ...
    Related: abortion, hierarchy of needs, moral status, right to life, personhood
  • Absolutism And Relativism - 1,251 words
    Absolutism And Relativism Absolutism and relativism are two extreme ethical approaches to reality. While they are both valid and supported by facts, they are very contrasting in their views. Values are what a person cares about and thinks is worthwhile. For example, values can include life, love, religious faith, freedom, relationships, health, justice, education, family and many other things. Usually these values are what provides the passion in a person's life, and gives them hope and a reason for being. A person might go to any lengths to protect what they feel is right and to preserve these values. Values can be divided up into two subcategories: absolute and relative. Absolute values de ...
    Related: absolutism, relativism, john stuart mill, more important, fundamental
  • Accounting Ethics - 1,833 words
    Accounting Ethics When examining the effect of open marketing on the profession of accounting it is important to view it from three perspectives: the client's, the profession's, and society's. Additionally, two key areas that are affected by marketing must be addressed, these are concerning competition, and ethical implications. Marketing in public accounting is here to stay therefore making an argument against its existence would be fruitless; however, in order to achieve maximum benefit to the firm, the client, and society more stringent guidelines must be implemented at the firm level. The first, and most obvious, of the effected areas is competition. Within competition several points are ...
    Related: accounting, ethics, public accounting, small firms, keep prices
  • Adoption And Identity Formation - 994 words
    ... y, the adopted child must struggle with the competing and conflictual issues of good and bad parents, good and bad self, and separation from both adoptive parents and images of biological parents. If all adoptions were open, the adoptee would have the ability to know about the traits of each family. He would have an easier task of forming an identity for himself, rather than struggling with the issues of to whom he can relate. If the adolescent has some information about his birth parents, such as ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion, Horner and Rosenberg (1991) believe that the following can happen: From the bits of fact that they possess, adopted children develop and elaborate ...
    Related: adoption, formation, identity formation, life cycle, family life
  • Affirmative Action - 1,098 words
    Affirmative Action Affirmative Action ? The Right Approach? In the beginning, it seemed simple enough. In 1961, John F. Kennedy, then president of the United States of America, established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity by executive order. The goal was to curb discrimination by the government and its contractors, who were now required to ?not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, creed, color, or national origin. The Contractor will take affirmative action, to ensure that applicants are employed, and that employees are treated during employment, without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin.? Title VI of the Civil Right ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, equal employment, lyndon b johnson, adopt
  • Affirmative Action - 1,025 words
    Affirmative Action The idea that different subcategories of humans exist, and that depending on one's point of view, some subcategories are inherently inferior to others, has been around since ancient times. This concept eventually gained the label of "race" in 1789, a "zoological term... generally defined as a subcategory of a species which inherits certain physical characteristics that distinguish it from other categories of that same species." (Tivnan 181). Although slavery has been by and large eliminated in virtually every part of the modern world, the concept used to rationalize its implementation, "racism", still plagues most modern cultures. Races that were once enslaved, or are mino ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, education system, equal rights, inherently
  • Affirmative Action - 1,744 words
    ... from the same communities as their students they will be aware of the problems facing their community and that of their students, that way they can better help theses kids, than someone that lives outside of the children The community and has no idea of the problems they are facing. In 1984 their were seventy-one women professors out of 1,112 (6.4 per cent). They were not however, evenly distributed across subjects and departments, but were concentrated in conventionally female areas. Three out of five professors of library science are women, and five out of seven professors or nursing. Women are also notable represented in education ( seven out of forty-nine professors) and social work ...
    Related: action plan, action program, affirmative, affirmative action, social science
  • Affirmative Action Works There Are Thousands Of Examples Of Situations Where People Of Color, White Women, And Working Class - 1,451 words
    Affirmative action works. There are thousands of examples of situations where people of color, white women, and working class women and men of all races who were previously excluded from jobs or educational opportunities, or were denied opportunities once admitted, have gained access through affirmative action. When these policies received executive branch and judicial support, vast numbers of people of color, white women and men have gained access they would not otherwise have had. These gains have led to very real changes. Affirmative action programs have not eliminated racism, nor have they always been implemented without problems. However, there would be no struggle to roll back the gain ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, white house, working class, justice earl warren
  • Africanamerican Representation In The Media - 1,845 words
    African-American Representation In The Media In Jacqueline Bobo's article, The Color Purple : Black Women as Cultural Readers, she discusses the way in which black women create meaning out of the mainstream text of the film The Color Purple. In Leslie B. Innis and Joe R. Feagin's article, The Cosby Show : The View From the Black Middle Class, they are examining black middle-class responses to the portrayal of black family life on The Cosby Show. In their respective articles, Bobo, and Innis and Feagin are investigating the representation of race, particularly African American race, in the mass media. The chief concerns of their investigations lie in how African Americans deal with the way th ...
    Related: mainstream media, mass media, media, representation, working women
  • Agency Missed Early Tire Warnings - 1,113 words
    ... ncluded in the 1.4 million covered by the advisory a variety of 15 and 16-inch tires but only if consumers requested the change. Of the 148 deaths, NHTSA said 121 were reported directly to the agency, while the remainder were uncovered by Ford, Firestone and State Farm Insurance Co. in the course of the investigation. There also have been reports of 53 deaths deaths linked to the tires and Explorers in the Middle East and Venezuela. Firestone Narrows Flaw Probe By Caroline E. Mayer and James V. Grimaldi Washington Post Staff Writers Wednesday, September 13, 2000 ; Page A01 A top Bridgestone/Firestone Inc. executive told Congress yesterday that the company has narrowed its search into w ...
    Related: agency, tire, ford explorer, appropriations committee, characterized
  • Aggression And Its Intricacies - 2,232 words
    ... 19;s quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone wage war against strangers from a different country┘.The overwhelming majority of those who have killed┘have done so as soldiers in war, and we recognize that that has practically nothing to do with the kind of personal aggression that would endanger us as their fellow citizens. (8) Here a regular serving soldier spoke with experience of seeing the numerous soldiers that "[derived] their greatest satisfaction from male companionship, from excitement, and from the conquering of physical obstacles." Those men were most likely part of the 2 percent of combat soldiers (as noted by Swank and Marchandρ ...
    Related: aggression, world war ii, francis galton, human existence, cruel
  • Agression - 2,144 words
    Agression Aggression Aggression is a critical part of animal existence, which is an inherent driving force to humans, as we, too, are animals. The source of aggression within humans is a long summative list, but before trying to understand its source one must apply a working definition of aggression. Aggressive behavior is defined by Encyclopedia Britannica as any action of an animal that serves to injure an opponent or prey animal or to cause an opponent to retreat. (7) David G. Myers states that aggression is any physical or verbal behavior intended to hurt or destroy.(9) There are many types of aggressive behaviors, which can be differentiated from the factual act to the hidden motives. F ...
    Related: agression, slave labor, final solution, verbal behavior, track
  • Agression - 2,162 words
    ... in numerous altercations as children. Not as bullies but rather as fighters, the type of person who would not back down once attacked or hurt. This seemed like a strange connection between the type of job and a similarity in childhood activities, because significantly less than a third of school populations engage in fights on a regular basis. This seems to point at a genetic capacity for violence and aggression. More informally, Gwynne Dyer has felt, through his experiences as a soldier, his genes at work as he says; Aggression is certainly part of our genetic makeup, and necessarily so, but the normal human beings quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone ...
    Related: agression, sexual offenders, classical conditioning, aggressive behavior, weapons
  • Ai Edge Of Excellence - 1,012 words
    Ai - Edge Of Excellence Running head: The Edge of Excellence The Edge of Excellence Kathleen P. Munn Community College of Philadelphia Recently, the media has spent an increasing amount of broadcast time on new technology. The focus of high-tech media has been aimed at the flurry of advances concerning artificial intelligence (AI). What is artificial intelligence and what is the media talking about? Are these technologies beneficial to our society or mere novelties among business and marketing professionals? Medical facilities, police departments, and manufacturing plants have all been changed by AI but how? These questions and many others are the concern of the general public brought about ...
    Related: edge, excellence, computer system, running head, massachusetts
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
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