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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: infanticide

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  • A Modest Proposal By Swift - 1,196 words
    A Modest Proposal By Swift A Modest Proposal was a satirical essay written by Jonathan Swift depicting the horrific conditions of Ireland and the lives of the Irish people in 1729. The author portrays and attacks the cruel and unjust oppression of Ireland by its oppressor, the mighty English and ridicules the Irish people at the same time. However, Swift's opposition is indirectly presented. Jonathan Swift is able to do so by using the persona, irony, and wit in order to expose the remarkable corruption and degradation of the Irish people, and at the same time present them with practicable solutions to their unscrupulous and pathetic lives. The author uses a satire to accomplish his objectiv ...
    Related: jonathan swift, modest, modest proposal, proposal, swift
  • Abortion - 1,138 words
    Abortion Abortion has been one of the topics of hot debate for the last three decades in our nation. Since the Roe v/s Wade decision in 1973, some Americans feel the need to ponder whether aborting fetuses is a moral action. On the one hand, some people feel that abortion should be legal because a woman has a right to choose whether she wants to continue a pregnancy or not. It's her body. On the other hand, some feel that fetuses have no advocates and deserve a right to live, so it is immoral to abandon their rights and kill them. This issue is not only at the center of political debate, but philosophical debate as well. In this paper, I will examine and critique Mary Anne Warren's On the Mo ...
    Related: abortion, hierarchy of needs, moral status, right to life, personhood
  • Abortion, The Pope And Peter Singer - 1,563 words
    Abortion, The Pope And Peter Singer Abortion is one of the most controversial issues today. It has become a question of not only ethics, but morals. In the 1973 case of Roe v Wade the Supreme Court ruled that a woman has the right to terminate a pregnancy by abortion within the first six months of the pregnancy. However, conservative Presidents have changed the legislation enough to allow states to restrict abortion in various ways (Practical Ethics, Peter Singer). In the following paper, I will summarize the views on abortion of Pope John Paul II and philosopher, Peter Singer. These two men have very conflicting opinions about abortion. Pope John Paul IIs Argument: This argument is very ada ...
    Related: peter, peter singer, pope, pope john, pope john paul, pope john paul ii, singer
  • Birth Control And Abortion - 1,274 words
    ... roversial form of abortion is the partial-birth abortion. Using an ultra sound the abortionist grabs the baby's legs with forceps and pulls them out into the birth canal. The abortionist then delivers the entire baby except for the head and continues by jamming scissors into the baby's skull. The scissors are then opened to enlarge the hole. The scissors are removed and a suction is inserted. The baby's brains are sucked out causing the skull to collapse. The dead baby is then removed ( Partial). It has been proven that babies can feel pain in these procedures. The fetus can feel pain because it is alive and growing like a human. Something that is not living cannot feel pain. If one crus ...
    Related: abortion, birth control, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, publishing company
  • Birth Control Or Legal Murder - 1,232 words
    ... nta are cut into pieces and scraped out. Both procedures are usually done under general anesthesia, so they're not painful for the mother. Of course we know the child feels pain' (Whitney 94). Another method that is not performed much anymore is the saline injection; a long slow death process of poisoning the baby. The saline injection was developed in the Nazi Concentration Camps (Factbot) The most controversial form of abortion is the partial-birth abortion. Using an ultra sound the abortionist grabs the baby's legs with forceps and pulls them out into the birth canal. The abortionist then delivers the entire baby except for the head and continues by jamming scissors into the baby's sk ...
    Related: birth control, partial birth abortion, court ruling, human life, shari
  • Brave New World Eugenics - 903 words
    Brave New World - Eugenics In chapter II of a Brave New World Revisited by Aldous Huxley, Huxley makes some very bold statements on the current state of our nations increasing technology towards medicine. This leads to the formation of the idea that we need to institute a eugenics program. Though there are many drawbacks in using eugenics, the ultimate goal is very beneficial. Huxley gives a very clear example on why we need a system like eugenics when he states an example which involves introducing a cure for malaria to a tropical island. Suppose someone was to go to a tropical island with DDT and wipe out malaria. After two or three years, hundreds of thousands of lives are saved. Though t ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, eugenics, world war ii, ultimate goal
  • Catherine The Great - 1,166 words
    ... inst Turkey. Nevertheless, the drafts written by the electives were not wasted, as the materials were employed in a "Description of the Russian Empire and its International Administration and Legal Enactments," published in 1783. This proclamation was the closest thing that Russia had to a law code for the next 50 years (Hosking 100). It denounced capital punishment and torture, it argued for crime prevention and, in general, "was abreast of advanced Western thought for criminology" (Riasanovsky 259). Catherine decided that, before positing common interests, which did not exist, she should put more backbone into fragmented Russia by creating institutions which would enable citizens to wo ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, russian empire, everyday life, contribution
  • Concept Of Karma - 1,650 words
    Concept Of Karma MIDTERM EXAMINATION What is the relation, if any, of the concept of varna to the concept of karma? Two major concepts of the Hindu religion are varna and karma. While at first glance it may not appear that they are related, they in fact do have a direct correlation. The combination of the caste system and the concept of karma have an important part in explaining the consequences of life for the Hindu followers. Varna refers to the caste system. The caste system was divided into four categories. The Brahmins, the Kshatriyas, the Vaisyas, and the Shudras. There were also the untouchables. The Brahmins were the priests. The leaders were the Kshatriyas. The Vaisyas were the comm ...
    Related: karma, compare and contrast, caste system, british government, debate
  • Desirees Baby - 1,509 words
    Desiree's Baby The 19th century was a difficult time for many women and blacks because of the domination of white men over them. The social and economic hardships they faced in day to day life was a constant reminder of this domination. The social ideology in the story "Desirees Baby" was powerful and dangerous and held no escape for any character. A woman with small children who lost her husband would face extreme hardships without the support of close family members. One who happened to be down on their luck would not find much sympathy among their peers even with children. Kate Chopin was one of these individuals who was down on her luck with six children. But fortunately had the support ...
    Related: social life, brief biography, kate chopin, mixed, infatuation
  • Ethics Or Moral Philosophy - 424 words
    Ethics Or Moral Philosophy The field of ethics, also called moral philosophy, involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior. Philosophers today usually divide ethical theories into three general subject areas: metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics. Metaethics investigates where our ethical principles come from, and what they mean. Metaethical answers to questions are focused on the issues of universal truths, the will of God, the role of reason in ethical judgments, and the meaning of ethical terms themselves. Normative ethics involves a more practical task, which is to arrive at moral standards that regulate right and wrong conduct. Idea ...
    Related: applied ethics, ethics, moral obligation, moral philosophy, philosophy
  • Euripides Medea - 1,083 words
    Euripides Medea Euripides' Medea 2.) Since Euripides' play "Medea" is still one of the most controversial plays ever written about the evocations of women's rights, there are many dissimilar opinions on the justification for Medea's choice of infanticide. The two most distinct sides are, that her reasoning and her actions were completely vindicated and the other is that her reasoning and her actions were entirely erroneous and unethical. Her severe anger and turmoil caused by Jason marrying another women was overwhelming and devastated her. The only thing that she concerned herself with was to make Jason undergo the feelings of pain and suffering, even surpassed her own. Medea states that by ...
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  • Euthanasia Overview - 852 words
    Euthanasia Overview The term Euthanasia has become well known throughout the country. The word is derived from ancient Greek eu thantos, meaning easy death. Today, euthanasia is referred to as mercy killing. There is much controversy over whether or not the practice is just. Euthanasia raises many religious, medical, and ethical issues. Euthanasia can either be active or passive. Active euthanasia occurs when a physician or other medical personnel induces death. An overdose is administered to the patients in the form of insulin, barbiturates, or morphine, and then followed by an injection of curare. Passive euthanasia, on the other hand, is allowing the patient to die due to lack of treatmen ...
    Related: active euthanasia, euthanasia, overview, passive euthanasia, food supply
  • Genetics - 2,123 words
    Genetics Genetics: Issues of IVF, screening, pre-selection, genetic testing, cloning and the social implications. James Watson once said, We used to think that our fate was in our stars. Now we know that, in large measure, our fate is in our Genes (Jaroff 1998). On June 26th 2000, The Human Genome Project will unveil its rough draft mapping of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences within the human chromosomes (genetic code), to the public. The project has been ongoing since the late eighties, and is a huge international exercise, which has so far cost approximately 3 billion dollars. The final draft is expected to be complete by the year 2003 and the assumption is that it will have a mas ...
    Related: genetic code, genetic disease, genetic disorder, genetic screening, genetic testing, genetics
  • Greek Femininity - 1,393 words
    Greek Femininity Greek Ideas on Gender Roles Throughout history, the roles of women and men have always differed to some degree. In ancient Greece, the traditional roles were clear-cut and defined. Women stayed home to care for children and do housework while men left to work. This system of society was not too far off the hunter gatherer concept where women cared for the house and the men hunted. Intriguingly enough, despite the customary submissive role, women had a more multifaceted role and image in society as juxtaposed with the rather simple role men played. Morals for the two were also different. Men obviously had the upper hand with women being the traditional passive. For an example ...
    Related: femininity, greek, don juan, good deeds, freud
  • Holocaust - 1,106 words
    Holocaust The Lebensborn Project The topic of eugenics cannot be discussed without encountering the Holocaust, but this is as it should be. When contemporary geneticists, genetics counselors and clinical geneticists wonder why it is that genetics receives special attention from those concerned with ethics, the answer is simple and can be found in history. The events which led to the sterilization, torture and murder of millions of Jews, Gypsies, Slavs and children of mixed racial heritage in the years just before and during the era of the Third Reich in Germany were rooted firmly in the science of genetics (Muller-Hill, 1988). Rooted not in fringe, lunatic science but in the mainstream of re ...
    Related: holocaust, greek orthodox, third reich, concentration camps, super
  • In Ancient India, Women Occupied A Very Important Position With, In Fact A Superior Position To, Man Literary Evidence Sugges - 612 words
    In ancient India, women occupied a very important position with, in fact a superior position to, man. Literary evidence suggests that kings and towns were destroyed because a single woman was wronged by the state. For example, Elango Adigal's Sillapathigaram teaches us Madurai, the capital of the Pandyas was burnt because Pandyan Nedunchezhiyan mistakenly killed her husband on theft charges. Valmiki's Ramayana teaches us that Ravana and his entire clan was wiped out because he abducted Sita. Veda Vyasa's Mahabharatha teaches us that all the Kauravas were killed because they humiliated Draupadi in public. To instill such high ideals in humankind, Indian ancestors created a plethora of godesse ...
    Related: ancient india, indian women, occupied, women in japan, political parties
  • India Women - 1,691 words
    India Women Silenced by their culture large populations of women in India tolerate abuse and subsequent death because they have provided insufficient dowry. In a culture that is male dominated women are raised to be servants to their husbands often arranged to marry a man that they have never met. Women that are beaten or just unhappy must suppress their feelings to keep their husbands blissful or face shame and be turned away by their own families. Indian women's household must pay a dowry for the privilege of marrying a man of status. The dowry often consists of money, merchandise, or gold that is displayed when the couple is married. Women are being mistreated for insufficient dowry money ...
    Related: india, india today, indian women, married women, women in india
  • Legality Of Abortion - 1,349 words
    Legality of Abortion Abortion must be a legal and attainable procedure for women throughout the United States. Abortion is a subject which easily fits into the themes of CORE 1. Abortion pertains to many issues which are involved in CORE 1. CORE 1 analyzes civil rights as well as equal treatment for women in America. Abortion challenges the civil rights of the mother and the fetus which she bears. To deny abortion is denying the mother certain civil rights, but if the fetus is considered a person, then the rights of the fetus are being denied by allowing abortion to be legal. Abortion has been an element of human life for centuries. It dates back to BC times. Ancient abortions usually consis ...
    Related: abortion, legality, morality of abortion, roe v wade, due process
  • Life Or Death: Who Chooses - 2,215 words
    Life or Death: Who Chooses? In Roman times, abortion and the destruction of unwanted children was permissible, but as out civilization has aged, it seems that such acts were no longer acceptable by rational human beings, so that in 1948, Canada along with most other nations in the world signed a declaration of the United Nations promising every human being the right to life. The World Medical Association meeting in Geneve at the same time, stated that the utmost respect for human life was to be from the moment of conception. This declaration was re-affirmed when the World Medical Association met in Oslo in 1970. Should we go backwards in our concern for the life of an individual human being? ...
    Related: human life, right to life, medical association, young adult, tendency
  • Philosophy Abortion Rectitude - 1,407 words
    Philosophy - Abortion Rectitude There comes a time in the lives of most women when an ovum, fertilized with sperm, will implant itself into her uterine wall. This is nature's first step in its attempt to continue the human race. Currently, when this implantation occurs, the impregnated woman has the right to allow the embryo to nourish itself into existence or to eliminate all chances of that embryo attaining life through abortion. Every species of plant and animal on earth reproduce in one way or another. How could something as ancient and fundamental as reproduction turn into one of the most hotly contested moral debates in history? The question can only be answered if we first examine the ...
    Related: abortion, morality of abortion, philosophy, mary anne warren, self awareness
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