Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: infant mortality

  • 33 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana - 538 words
    A Day In The Life Of Catherine Bana Paringauxs article A Day in the Life of Catherine Bana, is one that is both moving and informative. Its description of the daily routine of a wife and mother from Balkoui shocks most American readers with the graphic reality of life in the impoverished nation. The article provides a vivid description of the geography of Sahel, the roles of males and females in this society, and the impact of recent international development. The families of Burknina-Faso depend on agriculture as the main source of their meager incomes. The climate and other geographical factors virtually shape the life Catherine Bana. She spends her days tending to the livestock and crops. ...
    Related: catherine, life expectancy, infant mortality, african culture, discusses
  • Absolute Poverty - 1,934 words
    Absolute Poverty Peter Singers characterization of absolute poverty is defined by using the criteria given by World Bank President, Robert McNamara. McNamara states that absolute poverty is, a condition of life so characterized by malnutrition, illiteracy, disease, squalid surroundings, high infant mortality and low life expectancy as to beneath any reasonable definition of human decency. This form of poverty affects human life on all levels of existence. A comparison is given between the relative poverty of industrialized nations versus the absolute poverty of developing nations. Relative poverty means that some citizens are poor, relative to the wealth enjoyed by their neighbors. Absolute ...
    Related: absolute, absolute poverty, poverty, relative poverty, save lives
  • Angola - 735 words
    Angola Geography Angola is located in southern Africa, boarding the South Atlantic Ocean and is between Namibia and Democratic republic of the Congo. The area is 1,246,700sq km. For size comparative Angola is less than twice the size of Texas. For the geographic coordinates they are 12 30 s 18 30 E. The coastline is 1,600km long. The highest point in elevation is Morro de Moco witch is 2,620 miles high. The population of Angola is 11,177,537. The Capital and its largest city is Luanda witch has 2,000,000 people. Some other large and main cities are Huambo that has 400,000 people and one more main city is Lubango, 105,000. The birth rate is 43.1/1000; infant mortality rate is 129.2/1000; dens ...
    Related: angola, civil war, south atlantic, water pollution, railroads
  • Ben Franklin - 1,759 words
    Ben Franklin Benjamin Franklin-Scientist and Inventor Benjamin Franklin has influenced American technology, and indirectly, lifestyles by using his proficiencies and intelligence to conduct numerous experiments, arrive at theories, and produce several inventions. Franklin's scientific and analytical mind enabled him to generate many long lasting achievements which contributed to the development and refinement of modern technology. Few national heroes, including George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, played a more significant role in shaping the American way of life than Franklin. According to Fowler, He personified the ideal of the self-made man, and his rise from obscurity to eminence exem ...
    Related: benjamin franklin, franklin, franklin stove, royal society, eighteenth century
  • Cambodia - 1,930 words
    ... hildren were underfed. Hundreds of thousands of children are orphans or have only one surviving parent. The crisis of poverty, affecting children and adults alike, makes lone-term planning difficult, or impossible. Because of insecurity and a shortage of revenue, the State of Cambodia has been unable to keep Cambodia's roads, bridges, and railway system in good repair. Trips that before 1970 took less than an hour from Phnom Penh by car, on well-paved roads, now take over three hours, on roads from which the paving has almost disappeared. Rapid Social Change A third theme is that for many Cambodians, as for millions of other people elsewhere in the 1990's, everything is changing so rapid ...
    Related: cambodia, theravada buddhism, dairy products, consumer goods, alike
  • Cheetahs - 1,037 words
    Cheetahs Cheetahs have been evolving and adapting themselves to the deserts of the Serengeti for many years. However, cheetahs have never been common in the wild, but they're now in grave danger of becoming extinct, due to loss of habitat, high infant mortality, and hunting by humans for hides. Cheetahs can and should be saved because they have a difficult time surviving on there own due to poor parenting skills, cub mortality, and energy demands. The cheetah is also a very important part of the ecosystem and will be disrupted if the cheetah becomes extinct. Saving the cheetah is very important for their niche as well the niche of others. This amazing creature needs to be saved. There are ma ...
    Related: infant mortality, parenting skills, food chain, adapting, solitary
  • Chinas One Child Policy - 547 words
    Chinas One Child Policy The success of China's economy over the last two decades would have been much less impressive, if not impossible, had they decided on any other population policy? China's family planing efforts have dropped the population growth from 3.3 percent in the seventies. To the current rate of 1.6 percent, moreover, during this period the fertility rate of Chinas women have dropped from 6 to 1.8 percent. The population of 65 years old was only 66 million in 1990, and now is expected to grow 90 million by 2000, and 167 million by 2020. China being over 1/6 of our population is wise to adopt this policy for themselves and to set an example for other developing countries. What i ...
    Related: child policy, equal rights, population growth, infant mortality, china`s
  • Earth Population - 424 words
    Earth Population Our Earth has changed more dramatically in the 20th Century then in any other time period previous. During this time the health of our planet has also been both harmed and improved in dramatic ways. Two examples are that in this century, we have produced more air pollution then ever before, but our nature conservation efforts are working. Based on that type of logic, it is usually very easy for a scientist to tell if a particular change in our environment during the 20th Century, was good or bad for our planet. That is where population growth comes in and breaks this idea. Is population growth good or bad for our world? This is a question which scientists around the world ha ...
    Related: population control, population growth, growth rate, child policy, extensive
  • Ecuadorin Crisis - 1,140 words
    Ecuadorin Crisis Latin American Politics Un Crisis Ecuatoriano The Ecuadorian economy has undergone a profound change since it first splashed into the world market. It has enjoyed eras of unprecedented prosperity based on exports. It's initial 2 periods of growth being characterized by a rush of cocoa production early this century and an explosion of bananas in the 1950's. However, the largest and most influential boom was caused by the skyrocketing price of oil during the 1970's. This period clearly benefited elites, and even helped the masses in some ways. Between 1960 and 1980 more than 10 years were added to Ecuadorian life expectancy, death and infant mortality rates dropped by 40 perce ...
    Related: crisis, banana republic, banking system, society full, proposal
  • Fabric Trade Form India To Canada - 2,918 words
    Fabric Trade Form India To Canada Canada, with its economic and political stability offers a variety of business opportunities. With such a large population of immigrants, Canada is known for its acceptance of diverse cultures. English and French are Canada's official languages and there are many other languages spoken freely by diverse racial groups on Canadian soil. Many different religions are also practiced freely and peacefully in Canada. India has a population of 986.6 million people. This country holds 15 % of the world's entire population. Within this country, a variety of cultures and traditions can be found. Christianity, Hinduism as well as the Muslim religion are all practiced fr ...
    Related: canada, fabric, india, north india, northern india, ontario canada, south india
  • Government - 2,325 words
    GOVERNMENT Government can not exactly be described as an industry segment but it has significant effect on the rest of the industry in every segment. Due to this big effect, we agreed that the two major effects of the government come in the form of Medicare and Medicaid. These two programs effect millions of people and eventually the health industry overall. Analyzing these programs that are very complex and intertwined with each other was a complex job. Even though we tried our best to separate them as two different segments, many problems are similar. We believe this information is essential while analyzing the rest of the industry. MEDICARE AND MEDICAID A) MEDICARE HISTORICAL CONTEXT Medi ...
    Related: federal government, cost containment, short term, health maintenance, discretionary
  • Human Development - 895 words
    Human Development Human development is very important in terms of living conditions in different countries. The statement any society committed to improving the lives of its people must also be committed to full and equal rights for all is true. The UN considers three factors to calculate human development in a country. These factors cover many aspects of a country, including social development in a country. Income, education, and healthy living are considered to be the most important factors in human development, which help to rid populations of poverty, and support human rights. First, the improvement of lives is directly related to human rights. According to the 2000 UN Human Development ...
    Related: development index, development report, human development, human rights, social development, universal declaration of human rights
  • Hungry Children - 626 words
    Hungry Children Some of the most preventable diseases known to humans is hate and gender differences along with emotional distress which continues to breed hunger and infect humankind. There will be a time when we will have to have a respect for all humans and provide equal access to food and the resources by which to be able to obtain nourishment or hunger will continue to be a problem. Like history dictates, it usually will require a disaster before we consider a transformation, which is a concept that each person is going to have to realize to end hunger. To give an example of how much U.S citizens do not spend on aid for the hungry children; consider this in 1991 we spent three times as ...
    Related: hungry, hungry children, gender differences, birth weight, steadily
  • Ireland - 1,355 words
    Ireland The Great Starvation of Ireland I. The starvation in Ireland: 1845-1852 Over the years, the people of Ireland have suffered many hardships, but none compare to the devastation brought by the Irish potato famine of 1845-1857. A poorly managed nation together with ideally wicked weather conditions brought Ireland to the brink of disaster. It was a combination of social, political and economic factors that pushed it over the edge. After a long wet summer, the potato blight first appeared in Wexford and Waterford in September of 1845. The phytophora infestans were carried in on ships from Europe and America. Less than a year later, in August of 1846, virtually the entire potato crop in I ...
    Related: ireland, british government, economic system, british army, target
  • Jamaica - 1,800 words
    Jamaica The island of Jamaica is the third largest Caribbean island. It is in a group of islands called the greater antilles. It has an area of 10 991 km squared or 4 244 sq. miles. Jamaica spans 230 km east to west and from 80-36 from north to south. It is third only to Cuba, which is the largest, and Hispaniola which is the second largest island. Jamaica lies in the Caribbean sea which is a part of the much larger Atlantic ocean. The island is 960 km south of Florida, 160 km southwest of Haiti, and 140 km south of Cuba. Jamaica is mainly a mountainous island but there are 320 km of fine sandy beaches, swamps, moist fern- forests, sprawling open plains, plateaus, rushing rivers, and magnifi ...
    Related: jamaica, caribbean islands, domestic product, world leader, economy
  • Jamaica - 1,115 words
    Jamaica The country of Jamaica has an ideal location. Located just south of Cuba, it is the third largest island in the Caribbean Sea with 10,990 km. Although the capital is Kingston, there are many other important centers of trade and business. The official language is English and the major religion is Protestantism. Transportation in Jamaica connects the entire country and movement thought out the island is very easy. There is a coastal highway traveling the whole coast. Air Jamaica and cruise ships make traveling to and from the island very easy. But despite all of the joys, there are very serious human-environmental interactions present. Mining on the island causes serve pollution and so ...
    Related: jamaica, world war ii, per capita income, official language, protestantism
  • Japan And Thailand - 1,284 words
    ... r km2, the overall population density of 340 per km2. Japan has the highest physiographic density (population to uninhabitable land) of any major nation. This opposes Thailand, which has an overall population of 117 persons per km2. Thailand does not have a problem with uneven population distribution, because it is a country that has not yet industrialised to a substantial level. This means that there are not a large number of jobs available in the cities to transmigrate for. The two countries have populations which, are structured very differently. Japan has an aging population where 16% are over the age of 65. While only 5% of Thai people are over the 65-year age bracket. This may be c ...
    Related: japan, thailand, foreign aid, consumer goods, aids
  • Latin America And Slavery - 1,934 words
    Latin America and Slavery Latin America and Slavery Prior to its independence Latin America had been controlled by external forces for hundreds of years. To be freed of control from these outside interests did not in any way guarantee Latin America a return to the status quo. In fact, the inhabitants of Latin America had done very well in assimilating their in house controllers. They adopted European language, religion, color, and just about everything else that the European culture had to offer them. Although they were free to do as they please and run their own affairs in the global neighborhood as we know it, they struggled to create an entity for themselves. They embody too much of what ...
    Related: america, latin, latin america, latin american, slavery
  • Malthus And Africa - 1,378 words
    Malthus and Africa Africa, being a third world country with much economic oppression, is currently being debated in the General Assembly about whether or not it should have population control. Many experts believe that, if not controlled, the rate of the increasing population of Africa will have disastrous effects. Over two hundred years ago, a man by the name of Thomas Robert Malthus wrote an essay on the effects of population and the food supply titled "An Essay on the Principle of Population." This essay dealt with the growth of population and if not restrained, how it would destroy man's subsistence here on Earth (Geyer 1). Much of what he wrote applies to not only Africa, but also the e ...
    Related: africa, malthus, northern africa, thomas malthus, thomas robert malthus
  • Mexico - 3,415 words
    Mexico Mexico Country Profile Country Formal Name: United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mexicans). Short Form: Mexico. Term for Citizen(s): Mexican(s). Capital: Mexico City (called Mééxico or Ciudad de Mééxico in country). Date of Independence: September 16, 1810 (from Spain). National Holidays: May 5, commemorating the victory over the French at the Battle of Puebla; September 16, Independence Day. Mexico Geography Size: 1,972,550 square kilometers--third largest nation in Latin America (after Brazil and Argentina). Topography: Various massive mountain ranges including Sierra Madre Occidental in west, Sierra Madre Oriental in east, Cordillera Neovolcá&aac ...
    Related: central mexico, gulf of mexico, mexico, mexico city, trade deficit
  • 33 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2