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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: indus river

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  • Alexander The Great - 477 words
    Alexander The Great Alexander the Great. Alexander's ideas concerning India were, at this point still sketchy in the extreme. To the Greeks, the land across the Indus was a shallow peninsula, bounded on the north by the Hindu Kush, and on the east by the great world- stream of Ocean, which ran at no great distance beyond the Sind Desert. On the main Indian sub- continent, let alone the vast Far Eastern land- mass from China to Malaysia, they knew nothing. Scylax, Herodotus and Ctesias had all written in some detail about India, but even if Alexander had read this stuff he still would not have been much smarter. By the 4 Th. century Persia had abandoned her Indian satrapies: and when it was o ...
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  • Alexander The Great - 5,132 words
    ... 120 and the minimum 60. After the Battle 25 Macedonians fell"in the first charge. Alexander had a statue made of each of them. He then erected each statue somewhere near Granicus. He also erected a statue of himself, although he did not even die, let alone in first charge. This was a strange gesture that would never be repeated again. 2,000 of Memnon's mercenaries survived. After the battle they were chained like lions and sent back to forced labor, probably in the mines. This was not a very placatory gesture by Alexander. The reason he gave for it was that "they had violated Greek public opinion by fighting with the Orientals against the Greeks." After his victory, Alexander went across ...
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  • Alexander The Great - 551 words
    Alexander the Great He was the ruler of Greece in the fourth century B.C. He was one of the greatest military geniuses of all time. He was born in Macedonia, the son of Phillip II, King of Macedonia. He received his military education from his father and was tutored by Aristotle, the great philosopher, and other great teachers of his time. By the time he was sixteen Alexander was left in charge of the kingdom when his father was away for any extended period of time and once led the army to put down a rebellion in one of the colonies of Macedonia. His father was assassinated when he was twenty and he ascended to the throne. The Macedonian kingdom was in disorder when he came to power and he r ...
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  • Economics Of India - 1,799 words
    Economics Of India Kalpesh P. Patel Dr. Cashel-Cordo Global Economics 271 February 1998 50 Years of Independence ; 5000 Years of History INTRODUCTION The Republic of India possesses tremendous contrasts and enormous ethnic, linguistic and cultural diversity. Since independence in 1947, the Indian civilization has expanded in every facet - from its increasing population to its to its intertwining cultural and social systems. There are over 1600 languages, nearly 400 of them are spoken by more than 200, 000 people. Ethnically, the country is comprised of mostly of Indo-Aryans and Dravidians while Hindus are the majority in the religious groups. The distinguishing characteristic of India is tha ...
    Related: british india, economic growth, economics, hindu india, india, india today, northern india
  • Hinduism - 1,665 words
    Hinduism hinduism The term Hinduism refers to the civilization of the Hindus (originally, the inhabitants of the land of the Indus River). Introduced in about 1830 by British writers, it properly denotes the Indian civilization of approximately the last 2,000 years, which evolved from Vedism the religion of the Indo-European peoples who settled in India in the last centuries of the 2nd millennium BC. The spectrum that ranges from the level of popular Hindu belief to that of elaborate ritual technique and philosophical speculation is very broad and is attended by many stages of transition and varieties of coexistence. Magic rites, animal worship, and belief in demons are often combined with t ...
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  • Plowing Up New Soil With World Agriculture - 1,638 words
    Plowing Up New Soil With World Agriculture Plowing Up New Soil with World Agriculture Since agriculture began to be developed nearly 10,000 years ago, people throughout the world have discovered the food value of wild plants and animals, and domesticated and bred them (Early Civilization). Today, people go to the market or grocery store to pick up cereal, rice, bread, meat, fruit, vegetables, and olives. People hardly ever think of where the food generally comes from. Most of the food that is found in the grocery store wouldn't be possible without world agriculture. Farming used to be primarily a family enterprise and to a large extent still is in most countries. In the more developed areas, ...
    Related: agriculture, ancient world, soil, soviet socialist, agricultural production
  • Political Forms Of Ancient India - 1,791 words
    Political forms of Ancient India Political forms of Ancient India The Indian sub-continent was the home of one of the earliest civilizations of man. In the history of ancient India we see many forms of society ranging from urban civilization of Indus Valley to the Classical Age of Gupta Dynasty. During this period we see a hierarchy of centralized and decentralized government. Some of which were highly organized in their political structure and government while others were merely weakened by internal problems and division of power. Indus Valley Civilization was one of the world's oldest and greatest civilizations which took shape around 3000 BC to 2500 BC in the valley of the Indus River. Re ...
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  • Religions Spread Through Conquest - 1,191 words
    ... (with perhaps the exception of Aztec), are equally as violent as Islam, if not more so. Perhaps the religion that has perhaps shaped the world more than any other religion has been Christianity. This is not to deny the roles of the vast numbers of religions in many parts of the world, nor is it to say that Christianity has been particularly unique. Despite the fact that the Western world likes to set European man and Christians apart from the rest of the world. Their connection to imperialism, mercantilism, and social conquest is undeniably real. While Islam is seen by many as a violent religion because of its origins and the popularization of the term 'jihad,' they have never had far-re ...
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  • The Harrapan Civilization - 612 words
    The Harrapan Civilization The Harrapan Civilization The Indus Valley, or Harrapan, civilization was discovered in 1920-21 when engraved seals were discovered near present-day Sahiwal in Pakistani Punjab at a place called Harappa. Excavations at Mohenjodaro in Sind discovered the buried remains of a civilization with a pictographic script. The Harappans first settled sites along the Indus River. This civilization extended to the Yamuna along the bed of the river Ghaggar in Rajhastan, Gujrat and up to the mouths of the rivers Narbada and Tapati. The Harappan culture extended from the Indus Valley through northeastern Afghanistan, on into Turkestan. Most of the major sites of this civilization ...
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  • When Studying History, Both In A Professional And Academic - 1,191 words
    ... has been, throughout the centuries, a relatively tolerant religion. It has never believed in any form of religious genocide, nor had any inquisitions or messianic crusades, as religions of many other parts of the world did. In fact Akbar I of 1556-1605 AD, the third ruler of the Mughal Empire, took the ultimate steps toward tolerance, by marring a Hindu princess, and allowing Hindus a strong role in the government (Ahmad, et. al., 187). The wars that Islam fought have been rather secular, despite the fact that their government often was not. However, the same cannot be said of Christian, Hindu, and Aztec government, all which had strong ties to both violence and conquest, and indeed, whi ...
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