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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: individual freedom

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  • Alexis De Tocqueville - 1,161 words
    Alexis De Tocqueville The Education of Women in America Tonry Hughes December 5, 2000 Politics 1311 In America women are given the opportunity to have an education. Not just an average education, but one that helps them throughout their life by giving them the knowledge to protect themselves. In chapter 9 of Democracy in America Tocqueville believes that the education of American women is superior to that of French women. He believes that our form of education is necessary to protect women from the dangers that the world holds, and to help out our country politically by giving women the tools to raise a moral family. By raising families with good morals all of America will also be moral. Asi ...
    Related: alexis, tocqueville, political system, american history, choosing
  • Anarchy - 1,764 words
    Anarchy Throughout the ages, man has toiled with various forms of government. From early day aristocracies to modern day democracies, man has developed theories of the ideal government. Of these governments, Anarchy has proven itself to be an unrealistic form of government. Anarchists pose different views of absolute liberty and the degree of government intervention as to the governmental figure of the times. Anarchy comes from the Greek word, anarchos, prefix an meaning 'not,' 'the want of,' 'the absence of,' or 'the lack of,' plus archos, meaning 'a ruler,' 'director,' 'chief,' 'person in charge,' or 'authority,' derived as 'having no government' or 'without rule' (Ask.com). Justice define ...
    Related: anarchy, working class, ancient china, self reliance, nonviolent
  • Brave New World - 1,458 words
    Brave New World Book Report of 'Brave New World' By Michael Tillman Theme: The theme of Brave New World is freedom and how people want it. The people want poetry, danger, good and bad things. This novel shows that when you must give up religion, high art, true science, family, love and other foundations of modern life in place of a sort of unending happiness, it is not worth the sacrifice. These are all also distinguishing marks between humans and animals that were abolished here. In exchange, they received stability with no wars, social unrest, no poverty or disease or any other infirmities or discomforts. However, they only live with an artificial happiness, which they have been brainwashe ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world book, mustapha mond, central london
  • Brave New World And 1984 - 1,356 words
    Brave New World And 1984 Imagine a world in which people are produced in factories, a world lost of all freedom and individuality, a world where people are exiled or "disappear" for breaking the mold. Both 1984 by George Orwell and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World are startling depictions of such a society. Although these novels are of fictional worlds, control of the future may be subtly evolving and becoming far worse than Huxley or Orwell could ever have imagined. Each society destroys the freedom of the individual through various controlling methods such as the denial of language and literature, a caste system and conditioning. One way in which each society controls is by limiting the lang ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, world literature, everyday life
  • Capitalism And Communism - 496 words
    Capitalism And Communism Capitalism and Communism are two totally different economic systems. Capitalism is a much better economic system than Communism. Capitalism is an economic system characterized by freedom of the market and is the economic system where you do not have freedom because the government will make most of your decisions for you. Capitalism has many pros to go along with its economy. The government will change gradually, but is able to adjust to it with ease. Each person also has individual freedom with lack of government interference. We also have the freedom to choose what we want and when we want it. On the other hand, not everybody will have a job, and the government will ...
    Related: capitalism, communism, wealth of nations, individual freedom, engels
  • Capitalism Vs Socialism - 1,084 words
    Capitalism Vs. Socialism In order to debate between Capitalism and Socialism, it is necessary to understand what the differences, advantages, and disadvantages are of both systems. Basically, Capitalism advocates private property, and that society does better when an individual can purchase and produce as they see fit. Socialism, in essence, is the theory that property ownership should reside in the hands of the government, and that the government can do more with the assets than individuals can. The difference between Capitalism and Socialism can be summed up by their definitions. They are based upon completely opposite philosophies. Capitalism is a political and economic system in which fa ...
    Related: capitalism, socialism, free market economy, health care, equality
  • Checks And Balances - 1,079 words
    Checks And Balances Constitutional Interpretation The problem of interpreting the Constitution and framer's intent is a constantly permeating and troublesome question in the minds of Supreme Court Justices, judges, prominent politicians, and policy makers alike. It is a problem that has been pondered for years and years in the courtrooms and on paper with no real conclusion. One such essay arguing this dilemma is "How Not to Read the Constitution" by Laurence H. Tribe and Michael C. Dorf, who explore the questions "Is reading the text just a pretext for expressing the reader's vision in the august, almost holy terms of constitutional law?" and "Is the Constitution simply a mirror in which on ...
    Related: balances, alexander hamilton, small group, modern society, medium
  • Clockwork Orange - 681 words
    Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange is one of the most controversial movies ever made. The movie is based around a thug named Alex, a teenager, who finds happiness in about any perverse action. Alex, who seems to find glory in rape, lust, and murder, tells the story from his point of view. The movie examines the usual cliches of "individual freedom". It seems as if Alex suffers from an attempt to exercise his own vitality within a social structure too severe to support it. The film is not only a social satire but also a "fairy tale of retribution" and a "psychological myth",(Kagan) all constructed around the truth of human nature. Each night Alex and his companions commit stylized but meanin ...
    Related: a clockwork orange, clockwork, clockwork orange, orange, individual freedom
  • Cloning - 1,551 words
    ... hat cloning from an already existing human may effectively work in the near future. In a movie called, The Boys from Brazil, two clones of Hitler are supposedly produced from a cell obtained containing Hitler's genes. This cell was in turn joined with an egg, and an embryo was formed containing solely the genes of Hitler with only the necessary ones from the woman. This science fiction-like experiment was done for many reasons, but it was mostly intended to test the clones' behavior away from one another and to see if any certain kind of attitude can be passed on from one clone to another. The boys in this movie seem to demonstrate this concept through their slight displays of Hitlers pe ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, common cold, molecular biology, martin
  • Comparingthe Pact And Memoirs Of A Geisha - 1,522 words
    Comparing-The Pact And Memoirs Of A Geisha English I.S.U-The Pact and Memoirs of a Geisha In the novels The Pact, by Jodi Piocoult and Memoirs of a Geisha, by Arthur Golden there is a strong reflection of life and its negative aspects. Not only do both novels involve a female whos life is controlled by those around her, but the girls are also controlled by a desired conception of themselves that they feel they have to achieve. The predominant ideas that exist in both works are those concerned with ones personal will to live a certain way and to achieve goals that are believed to grant success. Both stories involve a female who, through out her life, endures the pain that sometimes comes with ...
    Related: geisha, pact, small town, negative aspects, dreams
  • Comparingthe Pact And Memoirs Of A Geisha - 1,489 words
    ... e, both her and Chriss parents force the idea the one day Chris and Emily will be together, get married and have children. Emily knows nothing different than to be with Chris, because that is what everyone wants. It was clear that Chris loved her; of course hed want to make love to her. And certainly it was right-for Gods sake, shed been hearing her name linked to Chriss since before she could speak (Picoult, 141). Emily is so used to being told that her and Chris aregoing to end up together, it is as if her believing anything else is wrong. Emily begins feeling, as their relationship becomes more serious, that what she and Chris has doesnt feel quite right. This frightens Emily, because ...
    Related: geisha, pact, great depression, best friend, pleasant
  • Conceptions Of Divorce - 1,162 words
    ... inues her argument by following with, Prevention is the best solution to any problem. While an educational program can't prevent all divorce, it does lay the groundwork for stronger unions. Families educated about problem-solving skills have a better chance for successful relationships. Ager has a different view. She says, Human relationships are fragile and prone to disease. Not all marriages deserve to be saved, and I'd argue that divorce has redeemed more human spirits than it has doomed. She then goes on to ask: ....what about encouraging women to become financially self-sufficient before they become mothers? What about keeping better track of dead-beat dads? What about government-fi ...
    Related: divorce, marriage counseling, mayfield publishing company, current issues, forgiveness
  • Conservatismliberalismsocialism - 672 words
    Conservatism-Liberalism-Socialism Conservatism, liberalism and socialism can be called ideologies, as they constitute comprehensive set of beliefs and attitudes about social and economic institutions and processes (Lawson, 44). These three ideologies, which have been developed throughout history, share both similarities and differences. Conservatism, unlike liberalism, generally opposes radical changes in social and economic domain. As the word connoted, the accumulated knowledge of the past and its application to political and economic functions is better to be conserved. Almost all representatives of the theory of conservatism placed great emphasis on the wisdom of generations, which natur ...
    Related: national development, human rights, human beings, loyalty, experiment
  • Democracy In America - 1,069 words
    "Democracy in America" Alexis De Tocquevilles Democracy in America delves deep into how the American States and the federal government would grow politically and socially under the umbrella of democracy. He sees the United States as a unique entity because of how and why it started as well as its geographical location. De Tocqueville explains that the foundations of the democratic process in America are completely different from anywhere else on the globe. The land was virginal and the colonies had almost complete sovereignty from England from the very beginning because they were separated by an ocean and financial troubles. The people who came to America were the oppressed and unhappy in En ...
    Related: america, democracy, democracy in america, social democracy, democratic society
  • Democracy In Athens - 1,208 words
    Democracy In Athens A Democracy is defined as a government of, by and for the people. Originally, democracy meant rule by the common people. In this sense, and even before the beginning of modern class society, it was very much a class affair. It meant that power should be in the hands of the largest class: the poorest, least educated and the propertyless. As a result, democracy was feared and rejected by the educated, the cultured, and the wealthy. In classical Greece, democracy was seen by the enlightened and the educated as one of the worst types of government and society imaginable. The rule of the people was regarded as a threat to all the cherished values of a civilized and orderly soc ...
    Related: ancient athens, athenian democracy, athens, democracy, political power
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,359 words
    ... n of traditional Japanese cultural values with American consumer culture. In fact, anywhere where capitalism and consumer culture exist, we can find evidence of what could be seen as the de-centering of identity via the messages and demands of new Media. The individual "freedom" which Poster believes a de-centering of cultural identity via new Media entails raises some doubts questionable, however. Poster believes that through this de-centering force, individuals gain "freedom" from pre-conceived notions of their potential identity and place in the world. Thus the "de-centering" of their previously ordained identity ( ordained in the sense in which it is established for them by their soc ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, american consumer
  • Franklin D Roosevelt - 1,662 words
    ... Garner were renominated to represent the Democrats. They were running against Alfred Landon and Frank Knox. The Republicans tried to bring Roosevelt down, saying he failed in keeping his promise to balance the budget. But Roosevelt responded by sharing how he succeeded in ending the Depression and bringing the U.S. back to a prosperous nation. FDR's speech in New York City in 1936 left a very strong message to the world, saying, I should like to have it said of my first administration that in it the forces of selfishness and lust for power met their match. I should like to have it said of my second administration that in it, these forces are mastered (Freedman 1990, p. 194). Again, that ...
    Related: delano roosevelt, franklin, franklin d roosevelt, franklin delano, franklin delano roosevelt, president roosevelt, roosevelt
  • Freedom Versus Safety - 598 words
    Freedom Versus Safety More Freedom or Safety -- What Would You Choose? Where does one draw the line between individual freedom and the safety of the community? Recent tragedies in high schools around the country show a great increase in teen violence. The worst part it that these acts of violence arent just fights and shootings; they are planned mass murders in our high schools. No more poignant example brings into focus the question of individual freedom and safety for the school community. Does individual freedom mean that students can bring whatever they want, including weapons, to school? Does safety of the school community mean that students must be searched or go through metal detector ...
    Related: individual freedom, versus, teen violence, columbine high school, violence
  • Gandhi - 1,556 words
    ... inciple of love in all areas of life. For Gandhi, the state represented violence in a concentrated form. It spoke in the language of compulsion and uniformity, sapped its subjects' spirit of initiative and self-help, and unmanned them. Since human beings were not fully developed and capable of acting in a socially responsible manner, the state was necessary. However, if it was not to hinder their growth, it had to be organised so that it used as little coercion as possible and left as large an area of human life as possible to voluntary efforts. As Gandhi imagined it, a truly non-violent society was federally constituted and composed of small, self-governing, and relatively self-sufficie ...
    Related: gandhi, social issues, jawaharlal nehru, political movement, prayer
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,874 words
    Genetic Engineering Genetic Engineering Future Harmony or Future Harm The world of science has experienced many profound breakthroughs and advances in the twentieth century, but none perhaps as great as that of genetic engineering. However, the twentieth century society is not prepared or even willing at times to accept the moral and ethical controversies genetic engineering is creating. Genetic engineering, defined as the use or manipulation of an individuals genetic material in order to produce desired characteristics or results in the same individual, other individuals of the same species, or other species, is undoubtedly changing societys relationship with nature, medicine, and perhaps i ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic disease, genetic diversity, genetic engineering, genetic testing
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