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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: indigenous people

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  • 51000 - 994 words
    5/10/00 Globalization and Ideal Landscapes Globalization is a broad term that has several meanings to different factions, cultural Groups and nations. For our purposes globalization refers to the loss of time and space through the rapid development of technologies. It also refers to a world in which all nations and peoples are directly or indirectly connected through the international economy and world politics. This rapid trend toward a globalized world has seen supporters from both the first world financial sectors and the mass producing agricultural sector. Its main detractors have been environmentalists and the indigenous peoples who are adversely affected by the encroaching nature of gl ...
    Related: point of view, computers and the internet, indigenous people, landscape, supporters
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,065 words
    Aborigines And Their Place In Politics For much of their history, Australias major parties did not perceive a need to have Aboriginal affairs policies, but this altered in the 1960s and 1970s as the Aboriginal interest came to occupy a more prominent position. The policies of recent major governments, those being the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and the Coalition, consisting of the Liberal Party and National Party, have changed drastically since the Federation of Australia. The approaches throughout history of these major parties will be discussed briefly in order to gain an understanding of the foundation of each partys beliefs and platforms in regards to Aborigines. The main political issu ...
    Related: aborigines, self determination, international legal, aboriginal people, perceive
  • Aborigines And Their Place In Politics - 1,108 words
    ... s people in the criminal justice system. The Liberal Party reached an agreement with all states and territories to develop critical plans, in association with indigenous people, for the coordination of funding and service delivery aimed at reducing indigenous over-representation in the criminal justice system. This shows that the Liberal government is addressing the problem of Aboriginal deaths in custody, and giving weight to the issue in regards to their policies. While governments did in fact begin to respond to some of the affects of forcible removal during the 1980s, it was during the Labor governments reign that the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody handed down its ...
    Related: aborigines, common law, political issues, royal commission, liberal
  • American Discontent Focused On Financial Grievances, But The Chief Reason For American Opposition Was The Matter Of Authority - 1,737 words
    American discontent focused on financial grievances, but the chief reason for American opposition was the matter of authority. How far do you agree with this view? There were a number of causes that lead to conflict between Britain and the colonists in America during the second half of the eighteenth century. The question is whether an American rebellion was mostly due to a difference of opinion over how much independence the colonies were entitled to, or whether other reasons such as the difficulties imposed on America by taxation and control of trade were equally to blame. Certainly, the argument that Britain did not have the authority to deny the basic right of liberty to all of the colon ...
    Related: american, american development, american independence, american society, chief, discontent
  • Analysis Of An Aztec Encounter - 1,133 words
    Analysis of an Aztec Encounter Analysis of an Aztec Encounter The Spaniard and Aztec civilizations were two completely different worlds whose fated encounter caused some surprising reactions from both parties. Neither of these nations knew exactly what to expect or how to react to each others behaviors. Differences in religion, customs and weaponry became the deciding factors of who would be the dominant aggressor in these encounters. Even though both parties were unsure of what to expect, the Spaniards had already set a goal for themselves before they set foot in Mexico. They wanted to conquer the other nation and exploit them for anything of value. The climax of the Aztec Empire and the co ...
    Related: aztec, aztec empire, aztec religion, encounter, indigenous people
  • Are These Not Also Men - 718 words
    Are These Not Also Men? "Are These Not Also Men?" In 1511, Fray Antonio Montesinos spoke the words, "Are these not also men?" His famous quote was a response to the mistreatment of the indigenous peoples that inhabited the Americas, by the conquering Spanish. Immediately upon discovering and colonizing the New World a widespread debate arose in regards to the usage and treatment of the native Indians. This debate was primarily focused on how to classify the Indians. Many people believed that the Indians were not human at all and should be allowed to be treated merely as slaves. The opposing side, the church, argued back that the Indians, no matter how seemingly uncivilized they lived, were h ...
    Related: spanish conquerors, pope paul, point of view, seemingly, opposing
  • Australia Day - 453 words
    Australia Day Australia Day Australia Day is a day set aside to commemorate the arrival of Captain Arthur Phillip and the First Fleet at Sydney Cove on the 26 January 1788. On the day of his arrival, Captain Arthur Phillip declared the area that became the colony of New South Wales to be a British possession. This landing started the first permanent European settlement on this island continent. Australia Day, January 26, is celebrated with a public holiday and celebrations in every State. The choice of the 26 January as the day of celebration for all Australians has been queried and argued by many people. That the day might symbolize invasion, dispossession and death to many Aboriginal peopl ...
    Related: australia, south wales, aboriginal people, indigenous people, notion
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
  • Australian Welfare System - 1,261 words
    ... paid work. In our view it is reasonable to require people with capacity who are work-ready, are available for at least part-time work and have access to job opportunities to seek work that is suitable, having regard to their personal circumstances. We believe it is critical that a broader mutual obligations framework recognises, supports and validates voluntary work and caring, without prescribing any particular form of social participation. Objectives Overall, our goal is to minimise social and economic exclusion. Australias success in doing this will be measured by the following three key outcomes: 1 A significant reduction in the incidence of jobless families and jobless households. 2 ...
    Related: australian, support system, welfare, welfare reform, welfare system
  • Chiapas Revolution - 500 words
    Chiapas Revolution 1994 proved to be radical year in Mexican history. There were three major assassinations of political figures, President Carlos Salinas signed the NAFTA agreement, and a small revolution began in the Pacific Southwest of Mexico. Although all of these a major impact on Mexican society none played out to the public greater then Zapatista uprising in Chiapas. Several hours before 1994 became the New Year the Mexican state of Chiapas was thrust upon the international scene as the Zapatista guerilla army seized control of the city of San Cristbal de las Casas and five towns in the surrounding Chiapas mountain region. The guerillas were bands of ethnic Mayan Indian peasants from ...
    Related: chiapas, native people, mexican state, political issues, racism
  • Decolonization: Abandonment - 1,218 words
    De-Colonization: Abandonment De-colonization began with the British colonists in the United States who declared independence in 1776. Most of Latin America gained independence a few decades later. De-colonization continued through the mid-1970s, mostly in Asia and Africa, until almost no European colonies remained. Most of the newly independent states have faced tremendous challenges and difficulties in the post-colonial era. The stability and harmony of de-colonized countries are not guaranteed once the countries are left to the hands of indigenous people. Colonies were flourishing under the colonial administrative government which creates bureaucratic, legislative and educative filters tha ...
    Related: abandonment, french government, sustainable development, armed forces, petersen
  • Deforestation - 928 words
    Deforestation Deforestation When the Portuguese landed in Brazil 500 years ago the sight that greeted them was of a huge rain forest, which then ran along much of Brazil's Atlantic coast. In more recent times, there has been an outcry over the destruction of the much larger Amazon forest. But its devastation is nothing compared to Brazil's Atlantic forest. About 86% of Brazil's Amazon forest is still intact but only about 7% of the Atlantic forest remains. In this paper, I will explain why the Atlantic forest was destroyed, why deforestation happens, and the effects of rain forest destruction and the effect it is having on the Earth. Much of the Atlantic forest was destroyed to make way for ...
    Related: deforestation, greenhouse effect, urban areas, natural resources, climate
  • Does Mcdonalds Offer A Model Which Other Businesses Should Follow - 1,562 words
    ... 18-21 year olds, with a starting salary of 16,500 per year. It also offers its employees the opportunity to become part of the corporation through buying McDirect shares. Standardisation A key feature of the McDonald's model is the manner in which all of their operations are standardised. Production line techniques are implemented in restaurants to achieve the fast preparation of uniform quality products. With a limited menu and patented formulas, the corporation ensures that products remain homogenous over distance and time. The fixtures and fittings of restaurants are largely identical throughout the world, with minor variations to account for cultural differences. The McDonalds model ...
    Related: mcdonalds, developed countries, major achievements, international economy, market
  • England Went Through Dramatic Changes In The 19th Century - 511 words
    England went through dramatic changes in the 19th century. English culture, socio-economic structure and politics where largely influenced by the principles of science. Many social expressions occurred due to these changes. Transformations which categorized this time period could be observed in social institutions; for instance: the switch from popular Evangelicalism to atheism, emergence of feminism and the creation of new political ideologies (Liberalism, Conservatism and Radicalism). These are just a few of the changes that took place. All of this social alteration can be attributed to the importance of science. The English people began to trust more in empiricism and logical thought than ...
    Related: international system, social institutions, animal kingdom, conservatism, competing
  • Forest Policy In Malaysia - 1,269 words
    Forest Policy in Malaysia Malaysia is among the countries in Southeast Asia which has experienced remarkable economic growth and industrialization in the past decade. It is unique in that its success is not a result of adopting any one model for development. Rather, Malaysias government identified its goals and sought to create a country-specific model of development suited to their needs for growth. An example of this is the Malaysian governments increase in exports of manufactured goods rather than concentrating on natural resource commodities as suggested by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. (pg.6 , HBS) Unlike its neighbor Singapore, Malaysia is blessed with an abundance of ...
    Related: forest, malaysia, world bank, southeast asia, sustainable
  • Heart Of Darkness By Conrad - 1,103 words
    Heart Of Darkness By Conrad Heart of Darkness, written by Joseph Conrad, holds thematically a wide range of references to problems of politics, morality and social order. It was written in a period when European exploitation of Africa was at a gruesome height. Conrad uses double oblique narration. A flame narrator reports the story as told by Marlow, assigned to the command of a river steamboat scheduled to transport an exploring expedition. Kurtz is a first-agent at an important trading post of ivory, located in the interior of the Congo. Both Marlow and Kertz found the reality through their work in Africa. Marlow felt great indignation with people in the sepulchral city after his journey t ...
    Related: conrad, darkness, heart of darkness, joseph conrad, western civilization
  • Indians And Tribe Gambling - 1,385 words
    Indians And Tribe Gambling Indian tribes existed as sovereign governments long before European settlers arrived in North America. Treaties signed with European nations and later the United States in exchange for land guaranteed the tribes continued recognition and treatment as sovereign nations. Historically, state governments have been hostile to the concept of recognizing and dealing with tribes as sovereign governments. The United States negotiated numerous treaties which they continuously violated in pursuit of the Indians' lands and assets, and ultimately to impose their will on Indian tribes and people as they seen fit. These actions by the United States reinforce the colonialism theor ...
    Related: american indians, gambling, indian affairs, indian children, indian gaming, indian reservations, indian territory
  • Islam In Indonesia - 1,039 words
    ... nt Indonesian society polygamy is regarded as morally reprehensible. Islamic banks emerged in Indonesia in the 1960s and have since grown rapidly. There popularity among the population is a response to the growing western influences, people wish to reclaim the old values of Islam. In an Islamic banking system, interest cannot be accepted on loans or given to money in saving accounts. In an Islamic bank, a person can place money in a bank account. The bank uses this money to invest in other business and then divides the profit between them and the client at a predetermined rate. Interest was banned in the Koran because it was seen as the exploitation of the economically weak by the strong ...
    Related: indonesia, islam, school uniforms, ethnic groups, readily
  • Mexican Economy - 2,285 words
    ... co. The reality is that the post-NAFTA surge in imports from Mexico has resulted in an $8.6 billion trade deficit with Mexico for just the first six months of 1995. By adding the Mexican trade deficit numbers to the current deficit with Canada, the overall U.S. NAFTA trade deficit for the first six months of 1995 alone is $16.7 billion. Using the Department of Commerce trade data in the formula used by NAFTA proponents used to predict job gains, the real accumulated NAFTA trade deficit would translate into over three hundred thousand U.S. jobs lost. A number of companies that specifically promised to create new jobs actually laid workers off because of the agreement. Allied Signal, Gener ...
    Related: economy, mexican, mexican economy, mexican government, mexican peso, mexican state
  • Mexican National Flag And Crest - 1,001 words
    Mexican National Flag And Crest The Mexican National Flag and Emblem The Mexican National Flag and its crest are symbols that represent the nation. Its origination can be traced back to the period of independence, when Mexico broke free from European foreign rule. The history of the crest or emblem of the flag is based on the representation of the founding of the land were Tenochtitlan was built. According to legend the Aztec God of War had given them a sign in which they were to build their Empire. The sign was an eagle perched on a cactus that would be tearing apart a serpent. After a long journey traveling from Aztlan, which is currently Nayarit, the Aztecs found what they had been search ...
    Related: crest, flag, mexican, mexican government, mexican history
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