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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: indian tribe

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  • Cherokee Indian Tribe - 472 words
    Cherokee Indian Tribe The Cherokee Indians first lived in Tennessee. The name Indian first came from Christopher Columbus, who thought that America was part of the Indies, Asia. The first person to come across Indians was Hernando de Soto, in 1540. In wintertime the Indian men wore long sleeved shirts, loose fitting leggings, and moosehide moccasins. Women wore skin dresses tied at the waist and long, fitted leggings. Indians would hunt deer, elk, moose and buffalo. They would also eat rabbits, raccoons and birds. The women would sometimes make a stew with the meat. They also ate berries, nuts, fruit and beans and corn. Indian houses were made of stone, wood, skins, twigs and mud. There were ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee indian, cherokee nation, indian, indian children, indian tribe, tribe
  • Indian Tribe - 919 words
    Indian Tribe The Southwest Region Native American tribe that is discussed in the following focuses on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. The Pima-Maricopa Indians have struggled and endured a constant hardship of events in its background, history, and location. Thomas Dobyns, the author of The Pima and Maricopa stated, "they have suffered through their worst years at the hands of ruthless investors and land grabbers, and the fight to undo the damage will never end. Descendants of the regions original inhabitants are, however, gaining skills in law, business, farming, and community organization that they are utilizing to win back the water and land that was once theirs." The Salt ...
    Related: american tribe, indian, indian tribe, tribe, california gold rush
  • American Hero - 1,078 words
    ... as known around the world for his writing of adventures through space, he once again electrified the movies screens and book stands with his Indiana Jones Trilogy." (Planet Indy NP) "The first book and movie in the series is Raiders of the Lost Ark. Readers and viewers find Indiana Jones in the Peruvian jungle in 1936, running a booby-trapped gauntlet to fetch a solid gold idol" (Planet Indy NP). Indiana puts himself in danger in order to achieve the task at hand He retains the artifact only to lose it to his chief rival, Belloq. This begins the story of Indiana Jones and his quest for the long-lost Ark of the Covenant. But during his search Indy is meet by the Nazis. Hitler hopes to fin ...
    Related: american, american hero, primary goal, indian tribe, heroine
  • Black Elk Speaks - 1,277 words
    Black Elk Speaks The division in the world among the races always was and will be one of the biggest issues that the people have to deal with and solve. Many cultures, Indian culture is one of the examples, were affected by the persecution of the people who were though to be "superior" to others. Indian culture was persecuted by whites, which wanted to wipe off the Indian civilization from the face of the world. The Native Americans wanted the same as anyone would, peace and freedom for their people. The Native Americans did not consider "white way of living righteous" for them, they were spiritual and had a different outlook on life, and did not want interference from outside world. In the ...
    Related: life experience, hard times, last battle, division, brutality
  • Captivity By Erdrich - 982 words
    Captivity By Erdrich Louise Erdrich, the author of the famous poem titled Captivity, tells a story about a married mother who has been held captive by a tribe of Indians. The poem uses a wide variety of literary elements such as sympathy, guilt, submissiveness, and tentativeness. The two main themes of this first person, six-stanza poem, are love and fear. Erdrich also uses tricksters, which are supernatural characters found in the folklores of various primitive peoples. They often function as culture heroes who are given acts of sly deception. In this poem, the narrators captor takes on the role of a trickster. In most of Erdrichs writings, she uses multiple characters as tricksters and thi ...
    Related: captivity, erdrich, louise erdrich, native american, first person
  • City Of Chicopee - 1,192 words
    City Of Chicopee A man by the name of William Pynchon settled in the City of Chicopee in 1638. William Pynchon bought the land in 1641 from the Nipmuck Indian tribe. The land was not officially settled until two brothers by the name of Henry, and Japhet Chapin, bought the land from John Pynchon in 1659. The city name derives from the Indian word, "Chicopee", and is translated to mean "Violent or Raging Waters". The land around Chicopee was mostly farmland for about 150 years, in and around the Connecticut River. The city of Chicopee became an industrial center in the early 1820's, because of the river locations and the people's ability to build factories and use the rivers for power. The cit ...
    Related: city limits, police department, state legislature, on the road, boat
  • Genocide - 1,677 words
    Genocide The Genocide of the Chiricahua Indian Tribe United States history is taught in public schools when we are old enough to understand its importance. Teachings of honorable plights by our forefathers to establish this great nation are common. However, specific details of this establishment seem to slip through the cracks of our educational curriculum. Genocide by definition is the deliberate and systematic destruction of a racial, political or cultural group. The Chiricahua Indian Tribe of the American southwest and northern Mexico suffered almost complete annihilation at the hands of the American policy makers of the late nineteenth century, policy makers that chose to justify their m ...
    Related: genocide, religious belief, late 1800s, american policy, relationships
  • Hogans Power - 1,482 words
    Hogan's Power In Linda Hogans 1998 novel Power, much is learned about Native American culture. The main characters, Omishto and Ama help reveal this culture. The novel is divided into nine chapters. In Chapter 1, "Omishto," a girl is in a boat that is floating on a pond. She notices that there is a storm coming in. She describes the pond and the area around it. A snake tries to enter the girls boat, but she pushes it out with a pole, and then she moves the boat to land. As she does this, she feels something watching her, but does not want to look in the direction. A woman named Ama has told the girl that she is in the territory of "the cat" (3). The girl says that she has never seen the cat, ...
    Related: native american, american culture, the girl, runs, arrive
  • Hutterites And Zuni - 1,688 words
    Hutterites And Zuni The Hutterites and The Zuni The Hutterites Often confused for Amish countrymen these people practice a similar way of life. However the Hutterites, unlike the Amish embrace some yet few creature comforts. Of these are electricity and gas powered machinery such as trucks and tractors. The Hutterites originated during the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century and are one of the three surviving Anabaptist groups. (Hostetler, 1) Their beliefs hold that man is evil and "fallen" from the grace of God. The harmony of nature is deterministic and man stands outside this harmony because of the Genesis account of original sin. The Hutterites exist and a pseudo-egalitarian ...
    Related: zuni, market economy, cause and effect, social order, raising
  • Indian Removal - 1,378 words
    ... ibes wanted toprotect it so they fought for it. The soldiers from Fort Gibson began to make boundaries, construct roads, and escort delegates to the region. The soldiers also started to implement the removal process in other ways to. The soldiers of Fort Gibson were fiercly hated by the Indian tribes of that region. Yet during the many years of the indian removal, there was never a alsh between the soldiers or the tribes. An Indian was never killed by the Army. The soldiers at Fort Gibson served as a cultural buffer between the whites and the indians. The Fort was established in the 1820's by General Matthew Arbuckle. He served and commanded it through most of it's two decades during the ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, indian tribe, removal
  • Mark Twain Racist Or Realist - 2,441 words
    ... rther. Twain was obviously concerned with his legacy considering the sheer amount of work he produced. The fact that he held back many works until after his death testifies to his dedication to his family because his later radical ideas could tarnish his name's sterling reputation. He opened up a dialog on miscegenation with pioneering works such as Pudd'nhead Wilson and the Adventures of Huckelberry Finn but he does it subtly. In Nationalism and the Color Line in Cable, Mark Twain, and Faulkner, Barbara Ladd calls Pudd'nhead Wilson a complex example of the use of black and white, foreign and domestic, northern and southern social bodies to examine the myths of racial purity, national un ...
    Related: mark, mark twain, racist, realist, twain
  • Paradise Within - 467 words
    PARADISE WITHIN The search for paradise is the neverending struggle through life for sanctum and inner-peace. While the knowledge of a single religion can cause doubts of afterlife, the contrast between two culturally diverse beliefs complicates matters even more; possibly to the point of enlightenment that one man's heaven is another man's hell. Likewise, the film, BlackRobe, plays on the similarities between Chomina, the Huron indian tribe leader, and Father LaForgue, the French Jesuit preist and the ultimate respect they gain for one another despite their cultural and religious diffferences. One must always show respect before one can expect to receive it however these circumstances come ...
    Related: paradise, inner peace, indian tribe, culturally diverse, jesuit
  • President Andrew Jackson - 1,032 words
    President Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson was born in 1767, and grew up in the border of North and South Carolina. He attended frontier schools and acquired the reputation of being fiery-tempered and willing to fight all comers. He also learned to read, and he was often called on by the community to read aloud the news from the Philadelphia papers. In 1775, with the beginning of the American Revolution, Andrew Jackson, then only 13 years old became an orderly and messenger. He took part in the Battle of Hanging Rock against the British and in a few small skirmishes with British sympathizers known as Loyalists or Tories. His brother Hugh was killed, and when the British raided Waxhaw, both he a ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, president andrew jackson, vice president
  • Running - 512 words
    Running In this study, I investigate the affects that running has on reducing the risk of some health problems. I am doing this because I run about 40 to 60 miles per week, and my family has a history of health problems. For instance, my grandfather suffered a heart attack, and he also had cancer when he was about the age of 50. Furthermore, my grandfather, on my dads side of the family, has also had triple bi-pass heart surgery from a heart attack he has had recently. Here, I present information from some sources that talk about the affects that running has on reducing health risks. My sources agree that running, and some other aerobic exercises, reduce the risk of: Diabetes, diverticular d ...
    Related: health problems, physical fitness, heart attack, zuni, grandfather
  • Ruth Benedict Margaret Mead - 432 words
    Ruth Benedict & Margaret Mead Ruth Benedict & Margaret Mead After high school, Ruth Benedict took a year off to travel overseas. Upon returning home she was unsure of what she wanted to do with her life. Years later, she married Stanley Benedict, a Biochemistry Professor at Cornell Medical School. In the fall of 1919, Ruth went back to school and began to focus more on anthropology. She studied under the famous diffusionist Franz Boas and became his assistant. Ruth taught Margaret Mead. Ruth and Margaret became good friends and developed a shared need of each other. Ruth concentrated most of her efforts on researching and studying different cultures on which many of her writings were based. ...
    Related: benedict, margaret, margaret mead, mead, ruth, ruth benedict
  • Scarlet Letter - 969 words
    Scarlet Letter Arthur Dimmesdale's all consuming guilt over his role in Hester's plight affected every facet of his life and his relationship with his congregation as a clergyman. As we take a trip into Dimmesdale's inner passions, fears and anxiety, we will discover the honesty of revealing secrets that have been locked away. In order to depict his emotions from the character's own point of view, the remainder of this essay will be reflected from Dimmesdale's own perspective as I believe the events to have transpired. Standing on the scaffold with her arms encircling the child of our intimacy, her hair falling with such perfection, my heart throbs to be with her. I bear the agonizing threat ...
    Related: scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, hester prynne, point of view
  • The Makah - 1,700 words
    The Makah The Makah are a Native Indian tribe who have recently decided to enact their treaty rights, and start to hunt for whales. These actions have caused an uproar in North America. The Natives state that they are not doing anything but exercising their legal rights. Opponents to their hunting of whales argue that the Makah are a group of uncivilized and inhumane individuals, and that they are harming nature. The reportage of the controversy surrounding the Makah can be seen as ethnocentric in many ways. Through the language used by the media involved in the controversy, one can constantly see the Native people being viewed as inhumane savages. In turn, this language allows readers to be ...
    Related: human dignity, per capita income, food sources, media, sending
  • The Passamaquoddy Indians - 1,142 words
    The Passamaquoddy Indians For several hundred years people have sought answers to the Indian problems, who are the Indians, and what rights do they have? These questions may seem simple, but the answers themselves present a difficult number of further questions and answers. State and Federal governments have tried to provide some order with a number of laws and policies, sometimes resulting in state and federal conflicts. The Federal Government's attempt to deal with Indian tribes can be easily understood by following the history of Federal Indian Policy. Indians all over the United States fought policies which threatened to destroy their familial bonds and traditions. The Passamaquoddy Indi ...
    Related: federal indian, indian affairs, indian removal, indian removal act, indian tribe
  • The Peyote Plant - 1,174 words
    The Peyote Plant Drug use has always been a topic of controversy, especially when it pertains to religion. One particular drug that has been brought to the attention of the federal government is Peyote. Peyote is a drug that has been used by the Native Americans for thousands of years. This drug, Peyote which has caused much controversy over the years has recently been reconsidered for legal use. Probably the most famous New World hallucinogenic plant is Peyote, (Lophoproria willamsii), a small spineless cactus, native to the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Also in the northern and central parts of the Mexican Plateau Region. Another species (Lidiffuss) is native to the Mexican State of Quertono ...
    Related: plant, federal government, nervous system, states government, prohibition
  • Tigua Indians - 2,499 words
    ... uld not have been allowed to vote. Indians were denied voting rights by law on the basis that they were wards of the government. This was true despite the fact that the Tiguas had been Mexican citizens and should therefore in accordance with the Treaty of Hidalgo been made citizens of the United States. The act gave Ysleta the power to regulate "tippling houses, dram ships, and groceries." It also explained how land could be granted or sold by the town, " to any person or persons who may desire to become citizens of Ysleta." Indians, as you may have guessed, could not become citizens, and so even though the law was an illegal law since the patent that was granted by the Fifth Legislature ...
    Related: indian affairs, indian gaming, indian tribe, el paso, american history
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