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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: indian territory

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  • Analysis Of The Last Of The Mohicans - 485 words
    Analysis Of The Last Of The Mohicans CONTRASTS AND CONFLICTS IN THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS In James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, everything is structured as a double, with the massacre of Fort William Henry standing eerily in the middle of the chapters. The first part of the novel is set within the confines of civilization, the second part in situated in the world of the Indians. The characters also have mirrored opposites. The good and bad Indian, the dark and fair lady, the noble red warrior and the dashing and aristocratic white soldier. However, it is the contrast and the interplay of the two Indian figures, Uncas and Magua, that make up the main theme of the story. It is in ...
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  • Genocide - 1,751 words
    ... hree warriors believed to be his nephews, his wife and two of his children. This exemplified that Cochise may have gone to talk on a friendly basis to the soldiers. Cochise denied any involvement in the matter, and was even willing to help in retrieval of the boy, but Bascom was not convinced. Cochise and his people were to be detained until Bascom that prompted Cochise to escape immediately by slitting his way through the tent and running away returned the boy, a move. Men had surrounded the tent, by order of Bascom, and Cochise was shot twice before his escape. His family was not so fortunate, all were captured and at least one warrior was killed. Cochise vowed revenge. (Sweeney 151). ...
    Related: genocide, general public, military action, american public, reputation
  • Imperialism - 622 words
    Imperialism During the 1700's and 1800's, the Imperialist movement in Great Britain grew rapidly. They expanded their influence over many countries, including India and China. In both Lin Tse-hsu's letter to Queen Victoria and Gandhi's article on the British in India, the reader gets two first hand accounts of the impact the British had on other countries. In Tse-hsu's letter, he talked about the opium trade Great Britain had with China. Although opium was illegal in England, the trade of it with China was still allowed. Tse-hsu tried to appeal to Queen Victoria and asked her to aid in China's attempts to end the drug trade. "Even though the barbarians may not necessarily intend to do us har ...
    Related: british imperialism, imperialism, drug trade, indian culture, stipulated
  • India Overview - 2,872 words
    India Overview A Brief History of India The roots of Indian civilization stretch back in time to pre-recorded history. The earliest human activity in the Indian sub-continent can be traced back to the Early, Middle and Late Stone Ages (400,000-200,000 BC). The first evidence of agricultural settlements on the western plains of the Indus is roughly contemporaneous with similar developments in Egypt, Mesopotamia and Persia. The Indus Valley Civilization This earliest known civilization in India, the starting point in its history, dates back to about 3000 BC. Discovered in the 1920s, it was thought to have been confined to the valley of the river Indus, hence the name given to it was Indus Vall ...
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  • Indian Removal - 1,356 words
    Indian Removal INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherokee Indians in the state of Georgia. In 1802, the Georgia legislature signed a compact giving the federal government all of her claims to western lands in exchange for the government's pledge to extigiu ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, removal
  • Indian Removal - 1,378 words
    ... ibes wanted toprotect it so they fought for it. The soldiers from Fort Gibson began to make boundaries, construct roads, and escort delegates to the region. The soldiers also started to implement the removal process in other ways to. The soldiers of Fort Gibson were fiercly hated by the Indian tribes of that region. Yet during the many years of the indian removal, there was never a alsh between the soldiers or the tribes. An Indian was never killed by the Army. The soldiers at Fort Gibson served as a cultural buffer between the whites and the indians. The Fort was established in the 1820's by General Matthew Arbuckle. He served and commanded it through most of it's two decades during the ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, indian tribe, removal
  • Indians And Tribe Gambling - 1,385 words
    Indians And Tribe Gambling Indian tribes existed as sovereign governments long before European settlers arrived in North America. Treaties signed with European nations and later the United States in exchange for land guaranteed the tribes continued recognition and treatment as sovereign nations. Historically, state governments have been hostile to the concept of recognizing and dealing with tribes as sovereign governments. The United States negotiated numerous treaties which they continuously violated in pursuit of the Indians' lands and assets, and ultimately to impose their will on Indian tribes and people as they seen fit. These actions by the United States reinforce the colonialism theor ...
    Related: american indians, gambling, indian affairs, indian children, indian gaming, indian reservations, indian territory
  • Nuclear Arms Control In India And The Abm Treaty - 1,048 words
    Nuclear Arms Control In India And The Abm Treaty Nuclear Diplomacy and Arms Control 1. There would be several advantages for the Government of India by adhering to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). For instance, adhering would ease international pressures spearheaded by the United States, Great Britain, and France. As India is just starting to become a nuclear power of its own, the already nuclear powers that be want to use India as an example to the rest of the world. As more countries become nuclear, they should sign the CTBT and follow the footsteps of the rest of the world powers. Another advantage of adhering to the CTBT is that Pakistan will also sign if India signs. (N ...
    Related: arms control, arms race, india, nuclear, nuclear power, nuclear weapons, treaty
  • President Andrew Jackson - 1,065 words
    ... porters accused them of making a corrupt bargain. Jackson was determined to defeat Adams in the election of 1828, and now he felt he had an issue that would help him win. Jackson, again running for the Presidency in 1828 was determined to win. His followers attacked Adams (who was running too) of the corrupt bargaining he had allegedly made with Henry Clay during the election of 1824. Adams responded by attacking Jackson with his marriage affair (scroll up for more details) with Rachael Jackson. Soon thereafter, she died of a heart attack.Andrew Jackson was convinced it was the fault of Adams and his administration and never forgave them for it. Andrew Jackson, as president was very simi ...
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  • Samuel Houston - 1,072 words
    Samuel Houston Sam Houston was as legend reports a big man about six foot and six inches tall. He was an exciting historical figure and war hero who was involved with much of the early development of our country and Texas. He was a soldier, lawyer, politician, businessman, and family man, whose name will be synonymous with nation heroes who played a vital part in the shaping of a young and prosperous country. He admired and supported the Native Americans who took him in and adopted him into their culture to help bridge the gap between the government and a noble forgotten race. Sam Houston succeeded in many roles he donned as a man, but the one most remembered is the one of a true American he ...
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  • The Albany Failure - 367 words
    The Albany Failure The Albany Failure Benjamin Franklin drew a plan for the colonies with the goal of uniting all colonies together under the King. The colonies nor the English wanted to accept this plan. After riducule and questioning of current success by the people, the Albany Plan of 1754 was vetoed. Thus proving to all the world that America was a world of independent thought. The Albany Plan was written to fairly represent all colonies under the King of England and to set regulations on expansion into Indian territory. In trying to convince the colonies to support this plan, Franklin drew a cartoon of a snake divided evenly into pieces. This was to show how the plan gave everyone a pie ...
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  • The Cherokee Indians - 1,013 words
    ... was the males against the females. The females did get to choose one male to be on their team(Brown 35-6). The Cherokee were divided into seven clans half of which were peace and the other half were war. The different clans did not all live together(Microsoft). The Green Corn Ceremony was the most important ceremony. It did not have a certain date because it occurred when the corn became ripe. This ceremony marked the end of the old year and the beginning of a new year for the Cherokees(Mails 196). The ceremony was the time of thanksgiving and spiritual renewal(Microsoft). Any mysterious diseases were blamed on a human or animal spirits caused by a witch. Priest tried to heal the disease ...
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  • The Kickapoo Indians - 1,988 words
    The Kickapoo Indians The Kickapoo Indians are Algonkian-speaking Indians, related to the Sauk and Fox, who lived at the portage between the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, probably in present Columbia County, Wis., U.S., when first reported by Europeans in the late 17th century. The Kickapoo were known as formidable warriors whose raids took them over a wide territory, ranging as far as Georgia and Alabama to the southeast; Texas and Mexico to the southwest; and New York and Pennsylvania to the east. Early in the 18th century part of the tribe settled near the Milwaukee River and, after the destruction of the Illinois Indians c. 1765, moved south to Peoria. One band extended as far as the Sangamon ...
    Related: federal indian, indian territory, lake erie, important role, winnebago
  • The Seminoles - 370 words
    The Seminoles The Seminole Indians are a tribe of Indians who now have territory and reservations in Florida and Oklahoma. They once belonged to the Muskogee tribe that lived along streams in what are now southern Georgia and Alabama. The Seminoles moved to Florida and Oklahoma around 1708 when the white men drove them out of their homes and took their land. The Seminoles adjusted well to life in Florida. In the late 1700s and early 1800s Florida was a territory of Spain, that made the Seminoles Spanish citizens. Like white men, they had black slaves, but they treated their slaves with respect. In the early 1800s General Andrew Jackson attacked the few Seminole villages left in Georgia and f ...
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  • The Trail Of Tears, Was It Unjust And Inhumane What Happened To The Cherokee During That Long And Treacherous Journey They We - 957 words
    The Trail of Tears, was it unjust and inhumane? What happened to the Cherokee during that long and treacherous journey? They were brave and listened to the government, but they recieved unproductive land and lost their tribal land. The white settlers were already emigrating to the Union, or America. The East coast was burdened with new settlers and becoming vastly populated. President Andrew Jackson and the government had to find a way to move people to the West to make room. President Andrew Jackson passed the Indian Removal Policy in the year 1830. The Indian Removal Policy which called for the removal of Native Americans from the Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia area ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee nation, trail, trail of tears, unjust
  • The Wild West - 1,017 words
    ... and fortune, he enlisted in the Third Colorado Cavalry under Colonel Chivington and was at the infamous Sand Creek Massacre. After the cavalry, Breakenridge became a train brakeman for the Southern Pacific Railroad and then a storekeeper in Sidney, Nebraska. In 1878, he moved to Phoenix, Arizona where he took the job as deputy Sheriff. He then moved to Tombstone and became deputy sheriff under Sheriff John Behan. During the late 19th Century no area in the United States was a haven and a refuge for criminals like the Indian Territory, pre-statehood Oklahoma. The jurisdiction of this territory fell to the United States court for Western Arkansas, located at Fort Smith, Arkansas. The cour ...
    Related: wild west, buffalo bill, pacific railroad, federal court, angelo
  • Treatment Of Native Americans - 1,084 words
    Treatment Of Native Americans After the American Revolution the new United States government hoped to maintain peace with the Indians on the frontier. But as settlers continued to migrate westward they made settlements on Indian lands and demanded and received protection by the Army. Tecumseh, a Shawnee chief, organized several tribes to oppose further ceding of Indian lands. But they were defeated in 1811 by Gen. William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe. During the War of 1812 many of the Indians again sided with the British. Afterward, with the victorious United States secure in its borders, federal policy turned to one of removal of the Indians west of the Mississippi River--to ...
    Related: american classic, american revolution, american troops, great american, native, native american, native american tribes
  • United States Expansionism: 1790s 1860s - 1,185 words
    United States Expansionism: 1790s- 1860s United States Expansionism: 1790s- 1860s The major American aspiration during the 1790s through the 1860s was westward expansion. Americans looked to the western lands as an opportunity for large amounts of free land, for growth of industry, and manifest destiny. This hunger for more wealth and property, led Americans conquer lands that were rightfully someone else's. Manifest destiny and westward expansion brought many problematic issues to the Unites States verses the Indians that took the Americans to the Civil War. The first issue that arose for the Americans, was where to put the existing Indians while they conquered their land. The United States ...
    Related: states army, states government, united states army, united states government, western united states
  • Washington Irving - 1,543 words
    ... he ten years between 1809 and 1819. Supported by his family and lionized by society for his early successes, Irving lived up to his reputation as a genial man of leisure. The second phase of Washington Irving's search for identity commenced when he set sail in May of 1815 for Europe. He was not to return for 17 years. His brother Peter falling ill, Irving stepped in to help run the import business. When the War of 1812 ended in 1815, low demand in the U.S. for trade goods from England caused the business to fail. Finally, in 1818, the brothers declared bankruptcy. Irving was devastated, becoming severely anxious about earning a livelihood. For the first time, he set out to write a commer ...
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  • Will Rogers - 1,243 words
    Will Rogers Will Rogers was a cowboy that did rope tricks. He was loved by the crowds that watched him. Onto the stage ambled a friendly-faced, tousled-haired man wearing a cowboy getup and carrying a collection of lassos in his hand. He smiled at the audience, then threw out one of the ropes, twirling it in a circle in preparation for one of the complicated rope tricks he was hired to perform. But as he went into the trick, he miscalculated the size of the small stage, and the rope whacked into the backdrop and fell to the ground with a loud thud. The audience was silent as the obviously embarrassed cowboy reached down and picked it up. Without a word, he tried the trick a second time. Agai ...
    Related: william penn, point of view, st louis, beverly, barrow
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