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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: indian removal act

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  • Discrimination - 576 words
    Discrimination The crossing of the Mississippi was a depressing experience for Indians and Women, the minorities, in the 1800s. The long and harsh journey over scourging desserts, rock-strewn mountains, and icy rivers caused sadness and despair to both groups of people. The first group of people that moved west was forced to leave their homeland, Georgia. These Indians had developed an admirable culture and were civil humans. They adopted the white mans ways by wearing their type of clothing, learning to read and write, and even practicing the white mans religion (295). Major William M. Davis even said, The Cherokees are a peaceable, harmless, people(298). The man behind all of this turmoil ...
    Related: discrimination, trail of tears, social life, president andrew jackson, sadness
  • Indian Removal - 1,356 words
    Indian Removal INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherokee Indians in the state of Georgia. In 1802, the Georgia legislature signed a compact giving the federal government all of her claims to western lands in exchange for the government's pledge to extigiu ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, removal
  • Indian Removal - 1,378 words
    ... ibes wanted toprotect it so they fought for it. The soldiers from Fort Gibson began to make boundaries, construct roads, and escort delegates to the region. The soldiers also started to implement the removal process in other ways to. The soldiers of Fort Gibson were fiercly hated by the Indian tribes of that region. Yet during the many years of the indian removal, there was never a alsh between the soldiers or the tribes. An Indian was never killed by the Army. The soldiers at Fort Gibson served as a cultural buffer between the whites and the indians. The Fort was established in the 1820's by General Matthew Arbuckle. He served and commanded it through most of it's two decades during the ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, indian tribe, removal
  • People Of Gilded Age - 1,511 words
    People Of Gilded Age After the Civil War had ended, several soldiers had returned home to find their places of living destroyed. Most of these people returned to practically nothing. The United States had to rebuild itself, and this rebuilding was called Reconstruction. Today historians refer to this era of reconstruction as the part of the Gilded Age. Many people had to pickup and start all over again, while others continued their quests of expanding. Expanding by taking control over the land or by expanding their beliefs, either way lives of these people reflected the social tensions of the Gilded Age. Philip H. Sheridan, who was one of the heroes of the Civil War, was a soldier who had st ...
    Related: black people, colored people, gilded, gilded age, western frontier
  • Removal Act Of 1830 - 1,876 words
    Removal Act Of 1830 Wallace Two distinct cultures existed on this Earth with the migration of man many thousands of years ago from Eurasia to the American continent. The people from the migration to the Americas had absolutely no contact with the people in Europe and Asia after they migrated. In fact, the two civilizations evolved in totally different manners, and at different speeds. The people in the Americas, or Native Americans existed mainly as hunter-gatherers using tools of bone, wood, and useful animal parts. Native Americans formed their beliefs into many different religions, and resided happily perhaps in buckskin wigwams or wooden longhouses. At the height of their civilization th ...
    Related: indian removal, indian removal act, removal, mississippi river, american revolution
  • The Cherokee Indians - 1,013 words
    ... was the males against the females. The females did get to choose one male to be on their team(Brown 35-6). The Cherokee were divided into seven clans half of which were peace and the other half were war. The different clans did not all live together(Microsoft). The Green Corn Ceremony was the most important ceremony. It did not have a certain date because it occurred when the corn became ripe. This ceremony marked the end of the old year and the beginning of a new year for the Cherokees(Mails 196). The ceremony was the time of thanksgiving and spiritual renewal(Microsoft). Any mysterious diseases were blamed on a human or animal spirits caused by a witch. Priest tried to heal the disease ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee people, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory
  • The Passamaquoddy Indians - 1,142 words
    The Passamaquoddy Indians For several hundred years people have sought answers to the Indian problems, who are the Indians, and what rights do they have? These questions may seem simple, but the answers themselves present a difficult number of further questions and answers. State and Federal governments have tried to provide some order with a number of laws and policies, sometimes resulting in state and federal conflicts. The Federal Government's attempt to deal with Indian tribes can be easily understood by following the history of Federal Indian Policy. Indians all over the United States fought policies which threatened to destroy their familial bonds and traditions. The Passamaquoddy Indi ...
    Related: federal indian, indian affairs, indian removal, indian removal act, indian tribe
  • The Seminoles - 370 words
    The Seminoles The Seminole Indians are a tribe of Indians who now have territory and reservations in Florida and Oklahoma. They once belonged to the Muskogee tribe that lived along streams in what are now southern Georgia and Alabama. The Seminoles moved to Florida and Oklahoma around 1708 when the white men drove them out of their homes and took their land. The Seminoles adjusted well to life in Florida. In the late 1700s and early 1800s Florida was a territory of Spain, that made the Seminoles Spanish citizens. Like white men, they had black slaves, but they treated their slaves with respect. In the early 1800s General Andrew Jackson attacked the few Seminole villages left in Georgia and f ...
    Related: seminole indians, seminoles, young woman, united states of america, territory
  • The Trail Of Tears - 1,084 words
    The Trail of Tears "We are now about to take our leave and kind farewell to our native land, the country that Great Spirit gave our Fathers, we are on the eve of leaving that country that gave us birth it is with sorrow we are forced by the white man to quit the scenes of our childhoodwe bid farewell to it and all we hold dear." This is the way that Cherokee Vice Chief Charles Hicks described, in 1838, the emotions that must have been felt after the mistreatment and the abuse that was wrought upon the Cherokee Indians. It was a trail of blood, a trail of death, but ultimately it was known as the "Trail of Tears". In this history of the Cherokee Nation we are trying, but without success, to b ...
    Related: tears, trail, trail of tears, mississippi river, indian removal
  • Treatment Of Native Americans - 1,084 words
    Treatment Of Native Americans After the American Revolution the new United States government hoped to maintain peace with the Indians on the frontier. But as settlers continued to migrate westward they made settlements on Indian lands and demanded and received protection by the Army. Tecumseh, a Shawnee chief, organized several tribes to oppose further ceding of Indian lands. But they were defeated in 1811 by Gen. William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe. During the War of 1812 many of the Indians again sided with the British. Afterward, with the victorious United States secure in its borders, federal policy turned to one of removal of the Indians west of the Mississippi River--to ...
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  • United States Expansionism: 1790s 1860s - 1,185 words
    United States Expansionism: 1790s- 1860s United States Expansionism: 1790s- 1860s The major American aspiration during the 1790s through the 1860s was westward expansion. Americans looked to the western lands as an opportunity for large amounts of free land, for growth of industry, and manifest destiny. This hunger for more wealth and property, led Americans conquer lands that were rightfully someone else's. Manifest destiny and westward expansion brought many problematic issues to the Unites States verses the Indians that took the Americans to the Civil War. The first issue that arose for the Americans, was where to put the existing Indians while they conquered their land. The United States ...
    Related: states army, states government, united states army, united states government, western united states
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