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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: indian removal

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  • Indian Removal - 1,356 words
    Indian Removal INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherokee Indians in the state of Georgia. In 1802, the Georgia legislature signed a compact giving the federal government all of her claims to western lands in exchange for the government's pledge to extigiu ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, removal
  • Indian Removal - 1,378 words
    ... ibes wanted toprotect it so they fought for it. The soldiers from Fort Gibson began to make boundaries, construct roads, and escort delegates to the region. The soldiers also started to implement the removal process in other ways to. The soldiers of Fort Gibson were fiercly hated by the Indian tribes of that region. Yet during the many years of the indian removal, there was never a alsh between the soldiers or the tribes. An Indian was never killed by the Army. The soldiers at Fort Gibson served as a cultural buffer between the whites and the indians. The Fort was established in the 1820's by General Matthew Arbuckle. He served and commanded it through most of it's two decades during the ...
    Related: cherokee indian, indian, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory, indian tribe, removal
  • Andrew Jackson - 1,175 words
    Andrew Jackson Born to Irish immigrants on March 15, 1767, Andrew Jackson was to become the first "rags to riches" President the country had ever seen. He grew up in South Carolina and fought in the Revolutionary War at only thirteen. His entire immediate family, parents and siblings, died as a cause of the war, whether it was being killed in battle or death from disease. He went on to serve two terms as the seventh President of the U.S., leaving behind a legacy of administrative policy and even his own democratic philosophy. The Second Bank of the United States was founded in Philadelphia in 1816. It was mainly a Republican project and a response to the expiration of the First U.S. Bank's c ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, thomas jefferson, houghton mifflin
  • Andrew Jackson - 1,175 words
    Andrew Jackson Born to Irish immigrants on March 15, 1767, Andrew Jackson was to become the first "rags to riches" President the country had ever seen. He grew up in South Carolina and fought in the Revolutionary War at only thirteen. His entire immediate family, parents and siblings, died as a cause of the war, whether it was being killed in battle or death from disease. He went on to serve two terms as the seventh President of the U.S., leaving behind a legacy of administrative policy and even his own democratic philosophy. The Second Bank of the United States was founded in Philadelphia in 1816. It was mainly a Republican project and a response to the expiration of the First U.S. Bank's c ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, indian removal, compulsory education
  • Andrew Jackson - 1,175 words
    Andrew Jackson Born to Irish immigrants on March 15, 1767, Andrew Jackson was to become the first "rags to riches" President the country had ever seen. He grew up in South Carolina and fought in the Revolutionary War at only thirteen. His entire immediate family, parents and siblings, died as a cause of the war, whether it was being killed in battle or death from disease. He went on to serve two terms as the seventh President of the U.S., leaving behind a legacy of administrative policy and even his own democratic philosophy. The Second Bank of the United States was founded in Philadelphia in 1816. It was mainly a Republican project and a response to the expiration of the First U.S. Bank's c ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, jackson, individual rights, thomas jefferson
  • Dances With Wolves - 346 words
    Dances With Wolves A major problem in the nineteenth century was westward expansion. Although the final outcome was good, it was a struggle to move the country into the wilderness. The government was greedy and wanted to take the Native Americans' land away from them. As a political leader in that time, I would not allow such a thing to happen. The Indians would be treated with respect and able to keep their land. The white Americans would be expected to treat them as equals, rather than savages. As depicted in "Dances With Wolves," soldiers ruthlessly killed Indians on sight. They didn't care if they were a threat or not because they were told by their superiors the Indians either had to be ...
    Related: wolves, native americans, white people, save lives, outcome
  • Discrimination - 576 words
    Discrimination The crossing of the Mississippi was a depressing experience for Indians and Women, the minorities, in the 1800s. The long and harsh journey over scourging desserts, rock-strewn mountains, and icy rivers caused sadness and despair to both groups of people. The first group of people that moved west was forced to leave their homeland, Georgia. These Indians had developed an admirable culture and were civil humans. They adopted the white mans ways by wearing their type of clothing, learning to read and write, and even practicing the white mans religion (295). Major William M. Davis even said, The Cherokees are a peaceable, harmless, people(298). The man behind all of this turmoil ...
    Related: discrimination, trail of tears, social life, president andrew jackson, sadness
  • Jacksonian Era - 726 words
    Jacksonian Era Jacksonian Era The Jackson democrats attempted to amplify the strength of lower classes' poor, while decreasing the influence of the rich and powerful. Economically, they benefited from governing during a time of leading advances in transportation, which boosted commerce and helped the common man. Politically, they invested power into an overwhelmingly powerful executive branch. The Jacksonian democrats portrayed themselves as saviors of the common people and ruled via a powerful executive who attempted to destroy aristocracy in America. However, they were atypically wealthy, supported equality between white men only, enacted disastrous economic policies and disregarded the ca ...
    Related: jacksonian, jacksonian democracy, foreign affairs, universal principles, economy
  • People Of Gilded Age - 1,511 words
    People Of Gilded Age After the Civil War had ended, several soldiers had returned home to find their places of living destroyed. Most of these people returned to practically nothing. The United States had to rebuild itself, and this rebuilding was called Reconstruction. Today historians refer to this era of reconstruction as the part of the Gilded Age. Many people had to pickup and start all over again, while others continued their quests of expanding. Expanding by taking control over the land or by expanding their beliefs, either way lives of these people reflected the social tensions of the Gilded Age. Philip H. Sheridan, who was one of the heroes of the Civil War, was a soldier who had st ...
    Related: black people, colored people, gilded, gilded age, western frontier
  • President Andrew Jackson - 1,794 words
    President Andrew Jackson President Andrew Jackson Like any hall of fame, its inductees are the best in whatever they do, from baseball or football to something like being President. If you are a member of any hall of fame (including the one for the Presidents), it means that you have done something special or have a certain quality about yourself that makes you worthy to be in a hall of fame. My nominee for the Presidents hall of Fame is our seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson. I'll go over his presidency, focusing on both the highs and the lows of his two terms in office, from 1829-1837. The issues that I'll focus on are states' rights, nullification, the tariff, the spoi ...
    Related: andrew, andrew jackson, great president, jackson, president andrew jackson, president jackson
  • Removal Act Of 1830 - 1,876 words
    Removal Act Of 1830 Wallace Two distinct cultures existed on this Earth with the migration of man many thousands of years ago from Eurasia to the American continent. The people from the migration to the Americas had absolutely no contact with the people in Europe and Asia after they migrated. In fact, the two civilizations evolved in totally different manners, and at different speeds. The people in the Americas, or Native Americans existed mainly as hunter-gatherers using tools of bone, wood, and useful animal parts. Native Americans formed their beliefs into many different religions, and resided happily perhaps in buckskin wigwams or wooden longhouses. At the height of their civilization th ...
    Related: indian removal, indian removal act, removal, mississippi river, american revolution
  • Seminole Patchwork - 1,105 words
    Seminole Patchwork Cross or sacred fire, arrow, zigzag, bird, wave, mountains and diamondback rattlesnake all have something in common. What do all of these names have in common? They are all names of Seminole patchwork designs. What exactly is patchworking? It can be defined as the process of sewing pieces of solid colored cloth together to make long rows of designs, which are then joined horizontally to other bands of cloth to form a garment (Downs, 1995, 88). This Native American artwork is closely associated with the Florida Seminoles. The history of this tribe and how they came to make patchwork garments is rather interesting. In making patchwork garments, things to be considered includ ...
    Related: seminole, seminole indians, andrew jackson, native american, circular
  • The Cherokee Indians - 1,013 words
    ... was the males against the females. The females did get to choose one male to be on their team(Brown 35-6). The Cherokee were divided into seven clans half of which were peace and the other half were war. The different clans did not all live together(Microsoft). The Green Corn Ceremony was the most important ceremony. It did not have a certain date because it occurred when the corn became ripe. This ceremony marked the end of the old year and the beginning of a new year for the Cherokees(Mails 196). The ceremony was the time of thanksgiving and spiritual renewal(Microsoft). Any mysterious diseases were blamed on a human or animal spirits caused by a witch. Priest tried to heal the disease ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee people, indian removal, indian removal act, indian territory
  • The Passamaquoddy Indians - 1,142 words
    The Passamaquoddy Indians For several hundred years people have sought answers to the Indian problems, who are the Indians, and what rights do they have? These questions may seem simple, but the answers themselves present a difficult number of further questions and answers. State and Federal governments have tried to provide some order with a number of laws and policies, sometimes resulting in state and federal conflicts. The Federal Government's attempt to deal with Indian tribes can be easily understood by following the history of Federal Indian Policy. Indians all over the United States fought policies which threatened to destroy their familial bonds and traditions. The Passamaquoddy Indi ...
    Related: federal indian, indian affairs, indian removal, indian removal act, indian tribe
  • The Pressures Of White Expansionism Led The United States Government To Find Ways To - 1,014 words
    The pressures of white expansionism led the United States Government to find ways to remove the Native Americans from their fertile lands. Spurred by this pressure, and the need to fulfill his campaign promise to open Indian land for settlement, Andrew Jackson pushed through Congress the Removal Act. The Act allowed the government to negotiate treaties with the various Native American tribes, pay them for their lands, relocate them to western lands, and support the tribes for one year after removal. President Jackson, more than anyone else, was responsible for the fate of the five civilized tribes of the southeast. When the state of Georgia annexed the Cherokee Nation's land within Georgia t ...
    Related: expansionism, federal government, states government, united states government, davy crockett
  • The Seminoles - 370 words
    The Seminoles The Seminole Indians are a tribe of Indians who now have territory and reservations in Florida and Oklahoma. They once belonged to the Muskogee tribe that lived along streams in what are now southern Georgia and Alabama. The Seminoles moved to Florida and Oklahoma around 1708 when the white men drove them out of their homes and took their land. The Seminoles adjusted well to life in Florida. In the late 1700s and early 1800s Florida was a territory of Spain, that made the Seminoles Spanish citizens. Like white men, they had black slaves, but they treated their slaves with respect. In the early 1800s General Andrew Jackson attacked the few Seminole villages left in Georgia and f ...
    Related: seminole indians, seminoles, young woman, united states of america, territory
  • The Trail Of Tears - 1,084 words
    The Trail of Tears "We are now about to take our leave and kind farewell to our native land, the country that Great Spirit gave our Fathers, we are on the eve of leaving that country that gave us birth it is with sorrow we are forced by the white man to quit the scenes of our childhoodwe bid farewell to it and all we hold dear." This is the way that Cherokee Vice Chief Charles Hicks described, in 1838, the emotions that must have been felt after the mistreatment and the abuse that was wrought upon the Cherokee Indians. It was a trail of blood, a trail of death, but ultimately it was known as the "Trail of Tears". In this history of the Cherokee Nation we are trying, but without success, to b ...
    Related: tears, trail, trail of tears, mississippi river, indian removal
  • The Trail Of Tears, Was It Unjust And Inhumane What Happened To The Cherokee During That Long And Treacherous Journey They We - 957 words
    The Trail of Tears, was it unjust and inhumane? What happened to the Cherokee during that long and treacherous journey? They were brave and listened to the government, but they recieved unproductive land and lost their tribal land. The white settlers were already emigrating to the Union, or America. The East coast was burdened with new settlers and becoming vastly populated. President Andrew Jackson and the government had to find a way to move people to the West to make room. President Andrew Jackson passed the Indian Removal Policy in the year 1830. The Indian Removal Policy which called for the removal of Native Americans from the Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia area ...
    Related: cherokee, cherokee nation, trail, trail of tears, unjust
  • Trail Of Tears - 1,421 words
    Trail Of Tears Within United States History, there has been some horrible discrimination upon certain races of people. At the trail of tears native Americans were persecuted against heavily. Until 1828 the federal government had Cherokee rights to their land and in that same year Andrew Jackson was elected president and this all ended. On September 15, 1830, at Little Dancing Rabbit Creek, the Chiefs of tribes and representatives of the United States met to discuss a bill recently passed by the Congress. This day started with all the same good intentions of those today but ended with only a few Native Americans signing the treaty which allowing for the removal of all Indian peoples to the we ...
    Related: tears, trail, trail of tears, mississippi river, manifest destiny
  • Treatment Of Native Americans - 1,084 words
    Treatment Of Native Americans After the American Revolution the new United States government hoped to maintain peace with the Indians on the frontier. But as settlers continued to migrate westward they made settlements on Indian lands and demanded and received protection by the Army. Tecumseh, a Shawnee chief, organized several tribes to oppose further ceding of Indian lands. But they were defeated in 1811 by Gen. William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe. During the War of 1812 many of the Indians again sided with the British. Afterward, with the victorious United States secure in its borders, federal policy turned to one of removal of the Indians west of the Mississippi River--to ...
    Related: american classic, american revolution, american troops, great american, native, native american, native american tribes
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