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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: inability

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  • The Inability To Provide For His Family, And Why It Drove Mr Shimerda To Suicide - 1,245 words
    The Inability to Provide for His Family, and Why it Drove Mr. Shimerda to Suicide My Antonia, by Willa Cather, is a novel about Jim Burden and his relationship and experiences growing up with Antonia Shimerda in Nebraska. Throughout the book Jim reflects on his memories of Nebraska and the Shimerda family, often times in a sad and depressing tone. One of the main ways Cather is able to provoke these sad emotions within the reader is through the suicide of Antonia's father, Mr. Shimerda. His death was unexpected by everyone and it is thought that homesickness is what drove him to take his own life. Homesickness was surely felt by Mr. Shimerda, as it was by many, but it was the failure to adeq ...
    Related: drove, inability, mr. shimerda, mrs. shimerda, suicide
  • 100 Years Of Solitude - 917 words
    100 Years Of Solitude 100 Years of Solitude Just as Edmund Spenser believes in the ever-whirling wheel of Change; that which all mortal things doth sway, so too does Gabriel Garca Mrquez. In One Hundred Years of Solitude, Colonel Aureliano Buenda experiences life and the changes which accompany it. Spenser views human life as a constant change from one stage to another. The change may be either good or bad; but one thing is certain, change is inevitable. Colonel Buenda is a dynamic character who transforms from an idealistic leader into an increasingly cynical and corrupt man. Toward the end of his life, he isolates himself from the rest of the world. In the beginning of Aurelianos career, h ...
    Related: one hundred years of solitude, solitude, book reports, edmund spenser, surviving
  • A Brave New World - 976 words
    A Brave New World A Personal Utopia: An Analysis of a Key Passage in Brave New World The key passage of Aldous Huxleys Brace New World takes place after John has been arrested and is a conversation with Mond. When John and Mond speak of ideal societies, a major part of Brave New World, the aspect of human nature which makes us search continuously for our personal Utopia, becomes apparent. In Monds study, the sacrifices each character makes in order to find a Utopia are interconnected. The search for a personal Utopia reveals Huxleys view on human nature of sacrificing everything to live with self-fulfillment. The connection of the sacrifices each character makes is shown in the study, helpin ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, ideal society, book reports, intelligence
  • A Generation Set Aside - 1,280 words
    A Generation Set Aside Often we hear of the generation gap -- that huge expanse between parent and child. Perhaps it is an acquaintance gap. Young people and adults do not know each other. The inability to communicate often enters the picture. Sometimes it is because neither knows what the other is interested in. They live under the same roof, but they rarely see one another, especially after the teenage years come along. The father goes off to work before the children are awake. Mother may go back to bed after seeing the husband off to work; or off to her own job. Teenagers get themselves up and off to school without seeing either parent. Then after school there is ball practice, band pract ...
    Related: generation x, everyday life, decision making, changing world, abundant
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,261 words
    ... had little wish to draw him into this conversation. I decided to change the subject quickly. "Coincidentally, yes sir. Why I'm calling, though, is to inquire about the number of outboard motors that have gone missing since last week." "Pardon me?" The tone of his voice took a sudden sinister turn that sent a twinge through my bladder. Like the rookie I was, I had made some as yet unrecognized blunder. I felt the strong urge to conclude the interview immediately, but it was too late. He knew my name. He knew my brother's name. He knew why I'd called. He knew everything. I'd have to bluff past my own ignorance. "Well, I was wondering if the police suspected some kind of theft ring being i ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, crime scene, media coverage, nash
  • A Minute To Approximately Three And Hurt His Ability To Defend Himself While He Loaded The Awkward Device The Shortcomings As - 1,224 words
    a minute to approximately three and hurt his ability to defend himself while he loaded the awkward device. The shortcomings associated with these muzzleloaders were, in a large part, responsible for the style of battlefield tactics of the day. Smokeless gunpowder was the next major advancement to affect gun development. Smokeless gunpowder led to the development of cartridge bullets. These bullets enabled the lead shot to be pre-packaged with the gunpowder and dramatically shortened the time involved with reloading. Additionally, the cartridge bullets were more streamlined than their predecessors and allowed the opportunity to pack more gunpowder with each shot. This additional gunpowder pro ...
    Related: awkward, defend, device, minute, shortcomings
  • A Rose For Emily A Closer Look - 1,288 words
    A Rose For Emily A Closer Look 12/2/97 period 1 William Faulkners A Rose for Emily tells the story of a young woman who is violated by her fathers strict mentality. After being the only man in her life Emilys father dies and she finds it hard to let go. Emily was raised in the ante-bellum period before the Civil War. This story takes place in the Reconstruction Era after the war when the North takes control of the South. Like her father Miss Emily possesses a stubborn outlook towards life, she refuses to change. This short story explains Emily, her mystified ways and the townsfolks sympathetic curiosity. The plot of the story is mainly about Miss Emilys attitude about change. On the first of ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, rose for emily, black woman
  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
    Related: blanche dubois, breakdown, named desire, psychological, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • A Streetcar Named Desire Symbols - 1,005 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire - Symbols Tennessee Williams was once quoted as saying "Symbols are nothing but the natural speech of drama...the purest language of plays" . This is clearly evident in A Streetcar Named Desire, one of Williamss many plays. In analyzing the main character of the story, Blanche DuBois, it is crucial to use both the literal text as well as the symbols of the story to get a complete and thorough understanding of her. Before one can understand Blanches character one must understand the reason why she moves to New Orleans and joins her sister, Stella, and brother-in-law, Stanley. By analyzing the symbolism in the first scene, one can understand what prompted Blanche to mo ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, tennessee williams
  • A World Of Diversity - 614 words
    A World of Diversity Ethnocentric, derived from the Greek words of Ethnos, meaning race, people or cultural group, and Kentrikos, meaning concentrated about or directed to a center is a word that greatly describes many cultures on this planet we call Earth . The official definition of Ethnocentric is " characterized or based on the attitude that ones own group is superior" or "having race as a central interest". There is a whole world of problems, politics, and, other cultures, but it seems that the average Americans only interest is that of themselves. The reason I chose to focus more on the American being ethnocentric is because I have been exposed the most to this culture. Why is it that ...
    Related: diversity, world politics, world view, foreign countries, simon fraser university
  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,142 words
    ... buting cause or consequence of beingantisocial. People that are both antisocial and alcoholic are prone toviolent behavior. Not every antisocial becomes a criminal. An antisocialpersons disorder peaks between the ages of 24 and 44 and drops offsharply after that. After the age of 30 the sociopath fights less andperforms less crime but the illness can persist into the ages of between 60and 70 but after 30 are less likely to be in trouble with the law. In asociopaths in their thirties will continue to have problems such as unstablerelationships, substance abuse, impulsiveness, poor temper control andfailure to honor financial obligations. In our population 3% men haveAnti-Social Personalit ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, antisocial personality disorder, anti-social personality disorder
  • Abortion - 1,964 words
    Abortion One of the most controversial topics over the years, and still today, is abortion. Is abortion murder or not? When does a fetus become a human? There are no answers to these questions. Everyone individual has their own beliefs on whether or not abortion is justifiable. Abortions have been performed throughout many of centuries. Recently, there has been a number of court cases that has changed the legality of abortions, especially in the United States, for example Roe v. Wade. Even religions have changed their views on abortions over the course of the years. In the abortions wars there are two parties, pro-life and pro-choice. Pro-life believes that abortion is murder and is complete ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, stress disorder
  • Abortion - 804 words
    Abortion Abortion has always been (and I reckon it will continue to be for quite some time) a very controversial issue not only due to the difficult comparison of rights (does the mother's rights outweigh the child's or vice-versa?) but also because of the many different instances in which the issue of abortion might come up. For instance, one couple who simply wants to plan their family, and be ready for it, is obviously different and less shocking a case as a raped fifteen-year old. Regarding abortion, pro-life and pro-choice are the two sides trying to impose their own points of view, but while one is extremely strict and makes a completely solid statement without taking each case in part ...
    Related: abortion, social aspects, point of view, process involved, application
  • Abortion And Prolife - 1,826 words
    Abortion And Pro-Life November 14, 1979, with the temperature outside at fifteen degrees, a two pound baby girl was found in a field wrapped up in a wet, dirty, old shirt. The umbilical cord was still attached, and the baby had been aborted twelve weeks prematurely. With little chance of survival, the baby was taken to a medical center. The little girl survived surgery and other efforts to save her. The baby was later adopted by, Susan Morrison, one of the nurses who attended to her. The baby was named Christelle, and now she and her mother talk to thousands of people about abortion and the pro-life movement (Maffet 13-14). This is an example of one person who felt they had the right to kill ...
    Related: abortion, fourteenth amendment, drugs and alcohol, united nations, despair
  • Absolute Poverty - 1,934 words
    Absolute Poverty Peter Singers characterization of absolute poverty is defined by using the criteria given by World Bank President, Robert McNamara. McNamara states that absolute poverty is, a condition of life so characterized by malnutrition, illiteracy, disease, squalid surroundings, high infant mortality and low life expectancy as to beneath any reasonable definition of human decency. This form of poverty affects human life on all levels of existence. A comparison is given between the relative poverty of industrialized nations versus the absolute poverty of developing nations. Relative poverty means that some citizens are poor, relative to the wealth enjoyed by their neighbors. Absolute ...
    Related: absolute, absolute poverty, poverty, relative poverty, save lives
  • Absolutism And Relativism - 1,251 words
    Absolutism And Relativism Absolutism and relativism are two extreme ethical approaches to reality. While they are both valid and supported by facts, they are very contrasting in their views. Values are what a person cares about and thinks is worthwhile. For example, values can include life, love, religious faith, freedom, relationships, health, justice, education, family and many other things. Usually these values are what provides the passion in a person's life, and gives them hope and a reason for being. A person might go to any lengths to protect what they feel is right and to preserve these values. Values can be divided up into two subcategories: absolute and relative. Absolute values de ...
    Related: absolutism, relativism, john stuart mill, more important, fundamental
  • Absurd - 1,347 words
    Absurd Theatre Influences on Theatre of the Absurd Big feet, stampeding rhinoceroses, and barren sets are typical of the theatre of the absurd. The dramatic content, symbolism, and spectacles are an amazing thing to see and an impossibility to comprehend. The philosophy of the absurd and the dawn of mankind influenced these plays in the twentieth century. The main proponents and works of the theater of the absurd and philosophy were influenced by the chaotic actions of the early and mid-twentieth century. These chaotic actions led them to search for something in literature and drama never seen before. A brief survey of the main proponents and works of the absurd philosophy and theater can le ...
    Related: absurd, human life, north africa, political power, cycle
  • Acceptance Of Homosexual Marriage - 1,033 words
    ... es. If gay couples were allowed to marry, it would set a bad example for children, and could spell the downfall of one of the cornerstones of our society. After all, whats next? Legalizing polygamy? Marriage between brothers? (Hetter 28-31) Hetter displays one belief of a large group of individuals who confuse what is right, and fair for society as a whole, with what is based on her one-sided religious beliefs. It is very difficult for some people to accept a change in things that differ from their everyday life and the way they were brought up. If those individuals could look at same-sex marriage open-mindedly they could see that they have been withholding, a precious right that could s ...
    Related: acceptance, gay marriage, homosexual, homosexual marriage, same-sex marriage
  • According To Aristotle, A Tragedy Is A Form Of Theater That Replicates A Solemn Action With The Intention Of Stirring Dread A - 1,073 words
    According to Aristotle, a tragedy is a form of theater that replicates a solemn action with the intention of stirring dread and sympathy in the viewer. Sophocles Antigone and Arthur Millers All My Sons both fit into this category. Both stories consist of a tragic hero, Creon and Joe Keller in this instance. According to Aristotles Poetics, a tragic hero is someone not all good or all bad, and whose downfall is caused by a tragic flaw or "hamartia". Later the hero comes to a realization of their flaw, which usually comes too late for them to redeem themselves. Creon and Keller are both tragic heroes that fit into Aristotles model, whose downfall is caused by greed, excessive pride and a belat ...
    Related: dread, intention, solemn, theater, tragedy
  • Adolescent Behavior In School - 1,692 words
    ... omfortable. The girl who was being "pushed" was blatently against the idea, her face was red, and I even headed her say several times, "I really don't want to do this, I feel like a jerk." Then she tried to bargain with her friends by saying, "I'll talk to him after Social class, I swear." But still the girls continued to drag her over to this boy. Then came the words I was waiting to hear, "You don't want to be the only one at this dance without a date, only the dorky girls go to the spring dance dateless!" Eventually this girl did end up going over to the boy outside. Another example of peer pressure I observed was within a group of boys. About five or six boys were "daring" one boy to ...
    Related: adolescent, adolescent behavior, high school, junior high school, middle school
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