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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: imperialist

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  • American Imperialism - 417 words
    American Imperialism The United States became an imperialist nation at the end of the 19th century because Americans wanted to expand over seas with their belief in manifest destiny. The three factors that started American imperialism were political and military competition including the creation of a strong naval force, economic competition among industrial nations and a belief in the racial and cultural superiority of people of Anglo-Saxon decent. The Spanish American War marked the emergence of the United States as a world power. This brief war lasted less than four months from April 25 to August 12, 1898. A number of factors contributed to the United States decision to go to war against ...
    Related: american, american imperialism, central american, imperialism, latin american, spanish american
  • Aristotlethe Politics - 1,294 words
    Aristotle-The Politics Aristotle believes that the chief ingredient for a life of happiness is virtue. Virtue is a state of the soul that disposes and prompts our actions and is meant to guide our behaviors in society and enable us to practice moderation. Aristotle believes that human happiness, which is not to be equated with the simple-minded pursuit of pleasure, stems from fulfilling human potentialities. These potentialities can be identified by rational choice, practical judgment, and recognition of the value of choosing the mean instead of extremes. The central moral problem is the human tendency to want to acquire more and to act unjustly whenever one has the power to do so. According ...
    Related: social structure, highest good, public service, leisure, acquire
  • Asian Crisis - 1,338 words
    Asian Crisis A large economic downturn in East Asia threatens to end its nearly 30 year run of high growth rates. It is hard to understand what these declines will actualy do to the world market. The crisis has caused Asian currencies to fall 50-60%, stock markets to decline 40%, banks to close, and property values to drop. The crisis was brought on by currency devaluations, bad banking practices, high foreign debt, loose government regulation, and corruption. Due to East Asia's large impact on the world economy, the panic in Thailand, Indonesia, Korea, and other Asian countries has prompted other countries to worry about the affect on their own economies and offer aid to the financially tro ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian crisis, asian nations, crisis, east asian, economic crisis
  • Barbarossa - 1,215 words
    Barbarossa When Germany invaded Russia in 1941, they did so neither near-sighted or as a back-handed diplomatic ploy. While Russia remained a key objective to Hitler, it was also seen as a necessity for long-term victory and survival in Europe for Germany. Plan Yellow, as developed by Field Marshal Erich von Manstein, called upon the pre-emptive strike against an imperialistic Russia, using speed and superior leadership as keys to victory. To always remember the axiom: History is written by the conquerers, is key to the history of the German-Russian War 1941-1945. This paper intends to not only convey the necessity and the upside of a German attack and subsequent victorys but also the Russia ...
    Related: barbarossa, witch hunts, armed forces, german economy, british
  • Battle Of The Ants And Shooting An Elephant - 875 words
    Battle Of The Ants And Shooting An Elephant Imperialistic View In both "The Battle of the Ants" by Thoreau and "Shooting an Elephant" by Orwell, imperialism plays a role. Both authors present, to some degree, their perspectives and feelings about imperialism. Orwell and Thoreau both present imperialism metaphorically through the use of animals and insects. The authors thus deliberate their introspection on imperialism by either being an imperialistic force or by taking part in imperialism. In "The Battle of the Ants" by Thoreau and "Shooting an Elephant" by Orwell, both authors use metaphors to represent their perspectives on imperialism. In "Shooting an Elephant" Orwell is taking part in im ...
    Related: ants, elephant, shooting, the narrator, deliberate
  • Bay Of Pigs 10 Pages - 1,112 words
    ... g the Bay of Pigs. The morning before the invasion, April 15, 1961, he ordered a nationwide alert (Goode, Stephen 80). On April 14, 1961, the Liberation Army set sail on six ships from Nicaragua. The Army consisted of about 1,500 troops and they had approximately five tanks, eighteen mortars, fifteen recoilless rifles, four flame-throwers, twelve rocket launchers, twelve landing crafts, and five freighters to do battle with (Robinson, Linda 54). The next day, the first strike was made on Cuba. The strike was good for the Army because it destroyed at least half of Castros planes, including B-26s, Sea Furies, and T-33 jet trainers (Goode, Stephen 80). This was an early attack on Cuba, and ...
    Related: bay of pigs, pages, pigs, news service, encyclopedia americana
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,409 words
    ... the world was looking at America wondering what it would do next. As communication helped the word spread about this "land of opportunity" more and more people wanted to immigrate, or at least come to America to see what all the talk was about. Many Chinese and Japanese came to the United States and saw it first hand from the 1860's on (Iriye, 39). For the Chinese the personal meeting did not make as grand of an impression as it did for the Japanese. For example, the Japanese were almost desperately interested in learning more about the military strength and power that the West held. However, the Chinese government was perfectly happy with maintaining their status quo. Although it is dif ...
    Related: cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication, cultural imperialism, greenwood press
  • Bolsheviks In 1920 - 1,777 words
    ... rences between themselves and the Russians (p. 80). In 1918, near the end of World War I, forces from the United States, France, and Britain gathered in Russia to "expand the eastern front" against the Germans (p. 84). The purpose of these interventions at first was to use Russian soil to win World War I, not to support either side of an ideological civil war that had just begun and was occurring simultaneously (p. 84). Before Russia made several questionable decisions in World War I, the ideology behind the Bolshevik regime was not challenged heavily by the west (Harris). Ulam states, "Until November 1918, the Allied intervention in Russia had nothing ideological about it. It was design ...
    Related: bolsheviks, social order, russian state, civil war, kiev
  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,759 words
    Bolsheviks In Wwi There were several major sources of conflict between the Bolsheviks and the western states in Europe from 1917 to 1921. Conflicting ideologies that each attacked the core of each other's respective society led to the notion that Capitalism and Communism could not coexist. The attempts of both actors to hold control of their own political system and to expand their political ideas internationally led to major conflicts between them. Also, the lack of respect for the upstart of the Bolshevik government by the west led to misperceptions concerning the actions of the Soviets. Russia's unsatisfactory involvement World War I and its abrupt departure from the war, which affected t ...
    Related: bolshevik party, bolsheviks, britain france, private property, imperialist
  • Bolsheviks In Wwi - 1,714 words
    ... states of the west began to take notice of the ideological differences between themselves and the Russians . In 1918, near the end of WWI, forces from the United States, France, and Britain gathered in Russia to "expand the eastern front" against the Germans . The purpose of these interventions at first was to use Russian soil to win WWI, not to support either side of the ideological civil war that had just begun and was occurring simultaneously . Before Russia made several questionably decisions in WWI, the ideology behind the Bolshevik regime was not challenged heavily by the west. Ulam states, "Until November 1918, the Allied intervention in Russia had nothing ideological about it. It ...
    Related: bolsheviks, russian civil, russian state, soviet union, compose
  • British Imperialism In Africa - 790 words
    British Imperialism in Africa British Imperialism in Africa The motives of Britain's imperialist activities in Africa from 1869 to 1912 were strategic and defensive. While other motives did exist, such as to colonize, to search for new markets and materials, to attain revenge and world prestige, to convert natives to Christianity, and to spread the English style of orderly government, the main motives evident in many events of the period showed attempts to safeguard the country and protect former land holdings. As its free trade and influential relationship with Africa was threatened, Britain began to turn trade agreements into stronger and more formal protectorates and even colonies. Britai ...
    Related: africa, british, british empire, british imperialism, east africa, imperialism, south africa
  • Caliban Inside And Out - 1,789 words
    Caliban Inside and Out Question: Compare or contrast the ways in which roberto Fernandez Retamar and George Lamming construct national identity through the figure of Caliban. Use Shakespeare's The Tempest if you need to to discuss Caliban. In order to discuss the ways in which Retamar and Lamming have constructed a national identity through Caliban it is essential to discuss the cultural background of these writers. Retamar and Lamming are about as dissimilar as night and day, and this is evident in both the lives that they have led, as well as the essays that they have constructed. Their differences have come from their experiences, and how they have attempted to establish an identity for t ...
    Related: caliban, face value, latin american, cultural background, islands
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Christopher Columbus - 1,124 words
    ... t find the trade route so Columbus wanted to get wealth from creating a gold mine on the islands, and by selling slaves. Only a small amount of gold was remitted to Spain, and didn't repay much. The slave trade drew little wealth, nor support from the monarchs and citizens of Spain. The attempt to bring wealth to Spain was not accomplished. The! entire expedition made by Columbus was an economic failure which put a hole in Spain's poor economy which was made up of 98% poor peasants. Columbus established colonies in the islands which would be settled, and be founded as a mining and farming colonies that would produce their own food and create a profit by remitting gold to Spain. These col ...
    Related: christopher, christopher columbus, columbus, holy trinity, primary sources
  • Christopher Hill: The Class Strugle Of The English Revolution - 1,050 words
    ... tory had been recorded, there had been kings, lords, and bishops in England. The church had dominated the thinking of nearly all Englishmen. Yet within a decade, war was waged against the king, the House of Lords was abolished and the King Charles I was executed in the name of the middle class. The act of 1649 was so uniquely shocking that on hearing it, women miscarried, men fell into melancholy, some with consternation expired. According to Hill, the people of the lower classes were very frustrated and could not stand their feeling of inferiority given to them by the upper classes. They revolted and then a capitalist system came to be where they could climb out of the socioeconomic tra ...
    Related: christopher, english revolution, lower class, middle class, martial law
  • Cuba: Crimes Against Human Rights - 2,006 words
    Cuba: Crimes Against Human Rights PART ONE CUBA: A Media Profile Media is the used around the world for the central purpose of sending and receiving information. To study the media in a country such as Cuba, you must consider the political, social and the cultural ideologies of the country. While most of the world is free flowing with information using mediums such as radio, television, the press and the Internet, Cuban people are exempted. The content within these mediums, reflect the ideologies of the Cuban government and also maintain a sense of nationalism. Information that reflects different ideologies of the Cuban government are not permitted on the island and are considered illegal. I ...
    Related: human rights, human rights watch, rights watch, fulgencio batista, important role
  • Cuban Missile Crissis - 1,338 words
    Cuban Missile Crissis The Cuban Missile Crisis by Tim Seigel History period 7 December 11, 1998 Back in 1962 most people thought there could not be a nuclear war. It was a time occupied by the Cold War. They were wrong. The U.S.A, Soviet Union, and Cuban countries were so close they could feel nuclear war breathing down their necks. The people of the U.S. were so close to being incinerated, and they didn't even know it. The Soviets had such a build up of missiles in Cuba they could have wiped-out most of the continental United States. The build up of these missiles, and the problems faced in October of 1962 are known as the Cuban missile Crisis. On October twenty second, 1962, John F. Kenned ...
    Related: cuban, cuban missile, cuban missile crisis, missile, missile crisis
  • Cubas Politics - 1,637 words
    ... ucation, jobs, health care, and equality for Cubans large lower class, many of whom are of African descent. They appreciated it then, and some still support Castro now. With the sudden end of Soviet subsidies (estimated at $5 billion a year), Cuban living conditions went from bad to worse. From 1990 to 1993, Cubas GDP declined by forty percent. Many Cubans went hungry. Castro, reading the desperate mood of the masses, discovered his approaching obsolescence and gave indications that he might reform. The Cuban people, yearning for reform, began to hope for a new day.17 It is evident that the political disposition of the country, as in most countries, has been influenced by its economic st ...
    Related: communications technology, prentice hall, economic status, manpower, potentially
  • Daudi Bohra English As Spoken In Sri Lanka - 2,090 words
    Daudi Bohra English As Spoken In Sri Lanka Daudi Bohra English as spoken in Sri Lanka by Tasneem Amirally Akbarally Paper V - Standards & Varieties of English Dr. Manique Gunesekara 1st November 2001 Daudi Bohra English as spoken in Sri Lanka Just a few centuries ago English was only spoken by about five to seven million people on Britain, which was merely one, relatively small island. The language at that time only consisted of dialects spoken by monolinguals. But the story of English is quite different today. There are more non-native than native speakers of English, and it has become the linguistic key used for opening borders. It is now a global medium with local identities and messages. ...
    Related: british english, english language, lanka, spoken, sri lanka
  • Destalinization - 1,646 words
    De-Stalinization Although many of his ideas did not bring the expected results, Nikita Khrushchev policies of de-Stalinization were politically wise. He went against many of Stalins tyrannical policies and gave the people a much greater sense of freedom. In the process known as "de-Stalinization", legal procedures were restored, some greater degree of meaningful public controversy was permitted, forced labor camps were closed and the secret police tactics of Stalins era were erased. Stalins method of personal rule was replaced by group rule and more orderly processes of government, the terror apparatus was largely dismantled, the economy was notably modernized and foreign policy was conducte ...
    Related: cuban missile crisis, foreign policy, food production, hydroelectric, congress
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