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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: imperialism

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  • American Imperialism - 417 words
    American Imperialism The United States became an imperialist nation at the end of the 19th century because Americans wanted to expand over seas with their belief in manifest destiny. The three factors that started American imperialism were political and military competition including the creation of a strong naval force, economic competition among industrial nations and a belief in the racial and cultural superiority of people of Anglo-Saxon decent. The Spanish American War marked the emergence of the United States as a world power. This brief war lasted less than four months from April 25 to August 12, 1898. A number of factors contributed to the United States decision to go to war against ...
    Related: american, american imperialism, central american, imperialism, latin american, spanish american
  • British Imperialism In Africa - 790 words
    British Imperialism in Africa British Imperialism in Africa The motives of Britain's imperialist activities in Africa from 1869 to 1912 were strategic and defensive. While other motives did exist, such as to colonize, to search for new markets and materials, to attain revenge and world prestige, to convert natives to Christianity, and to spread the English style of orderly government, the main motives evident in many events of the period showed attempts to safeguard the country and protect former land holdings. As its free trade and influential relationship with Africa was threatened, Britain began to turn trade agreements into stronger and more formal protectorates and even colonies. Britai ...
    Related: africa, british, british empire, british imperialism, east africa, imperialism, south africa
  • Cultural Imperialism And The Olympic Games - 1,540 words
    Cultural Imperialism And The Olympic Games Cultural Imperialism and the Olympic Games Virtually since their resumption in 1896, every four years the press is filled with complaints about the intrusion of power politics into the Olympic games. David B. Kanin has commented that while we are told that international Olympic system idealizes and promotes fair play and sportsmanship and ameliorates struggle, hatred, and petty jealously through structured competition and international goodwill, the realist is that international sport thrives on the very politics Olympic publicists decry (Kanin 1). Nevertheless, the games are more or less 'political', than anything else. Ninety-five percent of the p ...
    Related: cultural imperialism, cultural values, imperialism, international olympic, olympic, olympic games
  • European Imperialism - 317 words
    European Imperialism Chris Callahan March 13, 2000 Per 2 History European Imperialism Between 1875 and 1914, parts of Africa, Asia, and Latin America came under influence of Imperialism. Imperialism is the domination of the political, economic, and cultural life of one country or region by another country. Imperialism was a self-sufficient way of living. European's wanted a self-reliant way of living and gained control of smaller countries and regions to spread influence throughout the world. Imperialism has helped countries build better technology, increase trade, and has helped to build large and powerful militaries. Technology skyrocketed during imperialistic times. Money was available to ...
    Related: european imperialism, imperialism, raw materials, military power, history
  • Imperialism - 622 words
    Imperialism During the 1700's and 1800's, the Imperialist movement in Great Britain grew rapidly. They expanded their influence over many countries, including India and China. In both Lin Tse-hsu's letter to Queen Victoria and Gandhi's article on the British in India, the reader gets two first hand accounts of the impact the British had on other countries. In Tse-hsu's letter, he talked about the opium trade Great Britain had with China. Although opium was illegal in England, the trade of it with China was still allowed. Tse-hsu tried to appeal to Queen Victoria and asked her to aid in China's attempts to end the drug trade. "Even though the barbarians may not necessarily intend to do us har ...
    Related: british imperialism, imperialism, drug trade, indian culture, stipulated
  • Imperialism - 991 words
    Imperialism Imperialism is the practice by which powerful nations or peoples seek to extend and maintain control or influence over weaker nations (Freeman 2). Some people associate imperialism solely with the economic expansion of capitalist states, others reserve the term for European expansion after 1870. Imperialism and colonialism are similar in meaning and are often used interchangeably. However, there are distinctions between the two (Freeman 3). Colonialism usually implies formal political control including territorial annexation and loss of sovereignty (Jones 34). A sovereign state is one that is independent of all others. Imperialism refers more broadly to control or influence that ...
    Related: european imperialism, imperialism, scientific research, foreign trade, europeans
  • Imperialism - 1,025 words
    ... arly 7). What occurred in the Sixteenth century was not so much a discovery of a new world as a meeting of two branches of humanity which had previously been unknown to each other. The European invasions brought much that was radically new in the realm of ideas and values. For instance in agricultural methods including new crops and animals, in technology, the introduction of the wheel, iron, guns, ships, tools, and in the economy where the use of money, profit making and trade were far more developed than in Indian societies (Fagg 99). In both the European and Latin American states the religious establishment was closely involved with the business of government (Fagg 123). Both kinds of ...
    Related: imperialism, high court, spanish conquest, spanish colonies, privileges
  • Imperialism - 1,991 words
    Imperialism VHistory 101B 10/25/00 Section 8 Western Imperialism We live in a world in which the consequences of nineteenth and twentieth century Western imperialism are still being felt. By the early nineteen hundreds Western civilization reached the high point of its long standing global expansion. The expansion took many forms such as economic, political, and cultural imperialism. Europeans invested a lot of money abroad to build railroads, ports, mines, plantations as well as factories and public utilities. Trade began to grow between nations and the economy became more developed. Western civilizations became much more prosperous than the rest of the world due to the land usage and indus ...
    Related: cultural imperialism, imperialism, cultural aspect, public utilities, invasion
  • Imperialism - 1,550 words
    Imperialism Throughout time more powerful countries have extended their influence over weaker countries and then colonized those countries to expand their own power. Imperialism causes the stronger countries to grow and become nations or even empires. There are many examples throughout European history of nations enveloping weaker countries and increasing their own wealth and power to form strong nation-states and even empires. Through imperialism one culture is invading another culture and most of the time the European colonialists are not thinking about the effects this invasion might have on the natives of that land. Problems caused by imperialism have prevailed to this day. Imperialism c ...
    Related: european imperialism, imperialism, multimedia encyclopedia, great britain, implement
  • Imperialism In Late 1800s - 513 words
    Imperialism in Late 1800's Imperialism in Late 1800's The most important of the European territorial possessions was British India. The British first entered India as traders in the early 1600's. The British made alliances with Indian rulers and created its own army of Indian soldiers called sepoys. The driving force behind the British expansion in India was the British East India Company. Their power soon became known as the Raj as they extended their power. After a while they became responsible for maintaining order in the territories that they controlled. This soon grew very hard for the company so a governor-general was appointed to handle the political activities. To secure their positi ...
    Related: imperialism, late 1800s, military power, east india, british
  • Indian Imperialism - 442 words
    Indian Imperialism Indian Imperialism Britian was the most powerful country at the time of its empire in India. Between 1850 to 1890, Great Britian had a very powerful control over the world. Expanding from, fromerly known, United Kingdom to China and from China to the North America's maybe South America. It had terrotories between these land masses. With its naval glory and pride and its superiour land army, India was just another country to take over who played a big part in their economy. India is known by many countries as the economical "Gold Mine." For economic, nationalist, and humanitarian reasons, Britian's powerful nations have often interfered with the affairs of weaker nations. B ...
    Related: imperialism, indian, indian economy, north america, united kingdom
  • New Imperialism - 1,549 words
    New Imperialism New Imperialism Starting around the 1870s and lasting until around 1905, western nations began what is today called "New Imperialism." The major powers of the western world started to gain a need for expansion. Italy, France, Great Britain, United States and Germany started to feel the pressure being exerted on them by each other and realized that in order to stay on top and remain the a western power they must stretch their boundaries across seas. During this time period imperialism was a common theme amongst the populations of the western nations and many very influential people wrote and preached the need for expanding their particular countries influence. There were three ...
    Related: imperialism, western world, capital investment, economic growth, escaping
  • 1776 Vs 1789 - 1,691 words
    1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not primarily fought for independence. Independence was an almost accidental by-product of the Americans attempt to rebel against and remove unfair taxes levied on them by British Parliament. Through propaga ...
    Related: working class, middle class, great britain, master, propaganda
  • Absolutism And Relativism - 1,251 words
    Absolutism And Relativism Absolutism and relativism are two extreme ethical approaches to reality. While they are both valid and supported by facts, they are very contrasting in their views. Values are what a person cares about and thinks is worthwhile. For example, values can include life, love, religious faith, freedom, relationships, health, justice, education, family and many other things. Usually these values are what provides the passion in a person's life, and gives them hope and a reason for being. A person might go to any lengths to protect what they feel is right and to preserve these values. Values can be divided up into two subcategories: absolute and relative. Absolute values de ...
    Related: absolutism, relativism, john stuart mill, more important, fundamental
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,721 words
    ... breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tenderness: the ...
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  • Adrienne Rich - 1,720 words
    ... s Rich's breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed "complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality" hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tend ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, social status, face value, complexity
  • Africa - 1,680 words
    Africa European Imperialism European Imperialism European expansion was almost a certainty. The continent was relatively poor place for agriculture, which pushed Europeans outside of Europe in search of new soil. Different countries sent explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, to find unknown trade routes to India and Asia. They stumbled onto new sources for raw materials and goods and Europe was suddenly substantially profiting. The exploration of Africa, Asia, and South America provided new wealth. It increased the standard of living for Europeans, introduced them to spices, luxurious goods, silver, and gold (class notes). Later revolutions and reformers throughout the 19th and 20th centuri ...
    Related: africa, africa asia, power over, european society, indochina
  • All Quiet Western Front - 1,362 words
    All Quiet Western Front Annonymous By: Remarque Nationalism can be defined as having a sense of belonging and loyalty to ones country or nation state. Of all the European nations, France was the first to sport the idea of nationalism. Many countries became influenced by the French's ideas of nationali sm, As a result nationalism had spread throught out Europe by the nineteenth and twenteth century. One result that nationalisn had on Europe was, the wanting of unification. The people of nation states wanted their country to belong to. This wanting lea d to the unfying of Italy and Germany. Soon nationalism had increased the peoples confidedence., and a feeling of imperialism ran through the u ...
    Related: all quiet on the western front, quiet, paul baumer, world war i, injured
  • American Expansion - 214 words
    American Expansion In a sense, the United States has been expansionistic from its very beginning. The 13 English colonies, clinging to the eastern seaboard, were determined to push westward despite all natural and political obstacles. Once established as a nation, the United States went about acquiring even more land, including Florida, the Louisiana Purchase, and the Mexican Cession. The expansion associated with the late nineteenth century was just one chapter in a long book. One can begin writting a paper anout expansion of the U.S. beginning with the founding of the colonies. Colonial expansion involved many resons- land hunger, flight from religious persecution, etc.- The next main expa ...
    Related: american, american expansion, expansion, spanish american, open door
  • American Revolution - 1,425 words
    American Revolution Among the many complex factors that contributed to instigating the American Revolution, two stand out most clearly: Englands imposition of taxation on the colonies and the failure of the British to gain consent of those being governed, along with the military measures England took on the colonists. Adding to these aforementioned factors were the religious and political legacy of the colonies, and the restriction of civil liberties by the British. Parliamentary taxation was undoubtedly one of the greatest factors inspiring the American public to rebel in the years leading up to the American Revolution. One of the most striking examples of this kind of taxation was the Stam ...
    Related: american, american public, american revolution, american women, british army
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