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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: immigration policy

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  • Fluctuating Immigration Policy And The Economy - 1,956 words
    Fluctuating Immigration Policy And The Economy During the various decades of 1920 to 1960, immigration policy toward Mexicans was influenced by America's economic status at each decade. During this period there was much fluctuation in attitudes and policies toward immigration. America saw immigration policy go from an almost invisible border in the 1920's to massive military-like roundups of immigrants in the 1950's. During the 1920's while the Immigration act of 1924 was all but halting European and Asian immigration, thousands of Mexicans were allowed to cross the border without any trouble from the new anti-immigration legislation so that Mexicans could work seasonally in the fields. When ...
    Related: american immigration, asian immigration, economy, immigration, immigration policy
  • Us Immigration Policy - 1,025 words
    Us Immigration Policy The United States immigration policy has undergone great change since the turn of the 20th century. Many things have contributed to this change, such as political problems, poverty, lack of jobs, and in fact our changing policy. The countries affected by these problems may have changed but the problems themselves have not. No matter what the location or time period, people have been driven from their homeland as result of political disputes. There will always be poor, 3rd world countries that can not create a prosperous environment for their people. As a result of general poverty, few jobs are available, which forces citizens to look beyond the borders for work. Our cha ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, mass immigration, fidel castro
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
  • Economics Of Immigration - 1,228 words
    Economics Of Immigration From the origin of the United States, immigration has been crucial for the economic advancement and expansion of the nation. The US truly is a melting pot of many cultures and ideas, and it has benefited greatly from its diversity. However, with a much-reduced demand for unskilled or low-skilled workers, US policy must adapt so that it can better maximize the net economic benefits of immigration. While this probably does not include a universal drop in the number of legal immigrants, it would include the screening of applicants in such a way that preference is given to more economically beneficial candidates. It would also include making families totally responsible ...
    Related: economic benefits, economics, immigration, immigration policy, legal immigration
  • Ethical Issues In Us Immigration Policies - 1,136 words
    Ethical Issues In U.S. Immigration Policies The sun seems unrelenting as it beats down on the two families huddled together in a rickety makeshift boat. The rafters have been floating in the open sea for what seems to them like years. Their food and water supplies have run out and the littlest ones cry out of hunger. But the keep going. Because they know that once their feet touch the land of opportunity their prayers will be answered. Finally, their raft makes it to the ankle-deep waters and they are only a few short steps away from dry land and freedom. As quickly as the wave of relief and happiness rushes over the rafters, so does it disappear. The Coast Guard is there and telling them th ...
    Related: ethical, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy, immigration problem
  • Ethical Issues In Us Immigration Policies - 1,086 words
    ... e by the then 82 year-old humanitarian Katherine Dunham. Also, according to the article, an outcry erupted from U.S. Catholic bishops who said it was morally irresponsible and morally questionable (America, 1992, p.1). The article also quotes the Catholic Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy who said, It is only natural that the refugees experience should spawn well-founded suspicions that the treatment received by Haitians is the result of institutional racism. Only 55 out of 9,000 Haitians are granted political asylum, while there is no publicly recorded case of any one of some 10,000 predominantly white Cuban boat people being denied admission (America, 1992, p.1). Another author argues that ...
    Related: ethical, ethical treatment, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy, social issues
  • Illegal Immigration And The Economy - 1,295 words
    Illegal Immigration And The Economy Illegal Immigration and the Economy Illegal immigration has become one of the key political issues of the 1990s, especially in border states such as California. The Bureau of the Census estimates that there are now 4 million illegal aliens living in the United States and that about 300,000 more settle permanently each year. Four million illegal immigrants is undeniably a large number of people, but it is far below the invading army of 8 million 10 million aliens regularly reported in the media and by anti-immigrant lobbyists. Illegal aliens constitute only about 1.5 percent of the 260 million people living in the United States. Myopic and xenophobic Americ ...
    Related: economy, global economy, illegal, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy
  • Immigration - 1,424 words
    Immigration The first immigrants to the territory now the United States were from Western Europe. The first great migration began early in the 19th century when large numbers of Europeans left their homelands to escape the economic hardships resulting from the transformation of industry by the factory system and the simultaneous shift from small-scale to large-scale farming. At the same time, conflict, political oppression, and religious persecution caused a great many Europeans to seek freedom and security in the U.S. The century following 1820 may be divided into three periods of immigration to the U.S. During the first period, from 1820 to 1860, most of the immigrants came from Great Brit ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration reform, religious persecution
  • Immigration - 1,103 words
    Immigration The Canadian Immigration Policy and the Racial Discrimination it Induced The laissez faire approach to immigration that Canada had inherited over its lifetime began to fade away in 1884. British Columbia had become very concerned with the number of single male Chinese that had emigrated to the province since the 1860's when the American gold fields dried up. Thus, the provincial government took political action over the next year to finally impose a head tax of $50, on each Chinese immigrant who flocked to the region. In addition, Clifford Sifton, a struggling young lawyer from Winnipeg and the youngest member of the Cabinet of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, was obsessed by a dream of prom ...
    Related: immigration, immigration policy, canadian history, laissez faire, peril
  • Immigration In America - 1,282 words
    Immigration In America Immigration in America Most Americans place their pride in being apart of a country where a man can start at the bottom and work his way to the top. We also stress the fact that we are "all created equal" with "certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness." (Jefferson 45) During the early 1900s white Americans picked and chose who they saw fit to live in America and become an American. "Those that separate the desirable from the undesirable citizen or neighbor are individual rather than race." (Abbott 307) In the 1900s the desired immigrant was one who spoke English and customs who were similar to ours. Whereas an undesira ...
    Related: america, america american, immigration, immigration policy, latin america, north america
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,221 words
    Immigration Problem in the U.S. The first move stopping immigration decided by Congress was a law in 1862 restricting American vessels to transport Chinese immigrants to the U.S. The Alien Contract Labor Laws of 1885, 1887, 1888, and 1891 restricted the immigration to the U.S. of people entering the country to work under contracts made before their arrival. Alien skilled laborers, under these laws, were allowed to enter the U.S. to work in new industries. By this time anti-immigrant felling rose with the flood of immigrants and in this period the anti-Catholic, anti-foreign political party the Know-Nothings, was already born. After World War I a marked increase in racism and the growth of is ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,111 words
    ... he problem. Faster citizens processing, helping illegals country's economy such as NAFTA which is already in affect. Some suggest tamper proof residency cards, computerize the I.N.S., increases the number of boarder patrol agents, and build a wall around the U.S. and problem countries. There has been many suggestions made in dealing with this problem. The Gallegly bill is one of them. If ever completed by House-Senate conferees, is likely to include several conditions already adopted in similar form by both chambers. As passed by the House and Senate, the bill would: Increase the number of border patrol agents by 1,000 each year between 1996 and 2000, roughly doubling the force to reach ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform, legal immigration
  • Immigration: Should America Close The Golden Door - 1,654 words
    ... In the end a young immigrant population may very well save such programs as social security by increasing the number of workers in the market (Mont 18). These are all economic benefits, but the diversity the United States gains is a priceless commodity that future generations of Americans will need to succeed in a growing international job market. The Cost of Immigration The United States immigration policy does not allow people to immigrate if they are expected to be dependant on public services. Yet in 1993 approximately 12% of the 5.9 million recipients of Supplemental Security Income benefits were immigrants, even though they only account for about 5% of the population (Mont 15). Sta ...
    Related: america, golden, working poor, make money, searching
  • Interrogations Of Chinese Immigrants At Angel Island - 2,166 words
    ... with particular scrutiny. These interrogations were particularly strenuous and the questioning extremely detailed. Examples abound of tricky questioning such as this line of questioning from docket #19431/1-2 (Box 1211 National Archives): Q. What is his occupation? A. I do not know. Q. Did he tell you what his occupation was? A. I did not ask him and he did not tell me. Q. Did he tell you he was a business partner of your husband? A. Yes; he said he was in business with my husband, and that when he departed he left the business with my husband. Q. Why a moment ago, did you state that you did not know what the native of the nature of the business was? (67). As demonstrated in this excerpt ...
    Related: angel, chinese, chinese immigrants, chinese people, chinese women, ellis island
  • Lyndon Bains Johnson Was Born On August 27, 1908 In A Small Town Near Johnson City, Texas He Went To School At Southwest Texa - 1,470 words
    Lyndon Bains Johnson was born on August 27, 1908 in a small town near Johnson City, Texas. He went to school at Southwest Texas State Teachers Collage where he learned compassion for the poverty of others when he taught students of Mexican descent (Kearns 2). He graduated in 1930. Four years later he married a woman named Claudia Taylor and together they had two children, Lynda and Lucie. Johnson became President at the age of 55 when President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed. When he took oath, he had twenty six years of political experience and he was ready to take on the job of the President of the United States of America. It was at this time that he introduced to the American people ...
    Related: johnson, johnson city, lyndon, president johnson, small town, southwest, texas
  • Multicultural Participation In Olympic Movement - 455 words
    Multicultural Participation In Olympic Movement Multicultural Participation The goal of the Olympic Movement is to contribute to building a peaceful and better world by educating youth through sport practised without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit which requires mutual understanding, friendship, solidarity and fair play. Multiculturalism is a policy based on rights and responsibilities, which has been endorsed by Australian governments for managing a unified nation, which is culturally diverse. It is a policy that relies on mutual respect, whereby members of Australia's diverse communities respect each others' differences. Sydney's Bid for the 2000 Olympic Games promote ...
    Related: multicultural, olympic, olympic games, participation, english speaking
  • Multiculturalism In Canada - 1,753 words
    ... ghts and Freedoms (1982). (Blackman 1993:144) Because the C.M.A. is so enmeshed in the legislation of Canada its value is felt all throughout the country. There are over one-hundred and twenty organizations and groups involved in the C.M.A. from "Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada" to the "Western Grain Transport Office". Another reason why the Act is such a part of Canada is, in 1994 and 1995, many small institutions and businesses: Stated support for the policy and its objectives, Distributed a statement on multiculturalism to the staff, Consulted with representatives of ethnocultural and visible minority groups, Encouraged members of ethnocultural and visible minority groups to apply fo ...
    Related: canada, multiculturalism, statistics canada, english language, cultural understanding
  • Power In Society - 1,133 words
    ... ecognizing the diversity of various tribes. To justify their actions toward Aboriginal people, British used stereotypes to label them as uncultured and uncivilized, and decided that it is their job to bring Aboriginal people to the greater states of civilization by enforcing European norms in Canadian society (Frances, 2000: 121-123). One of the policies in 1857 even allowed for the voluntary release from the Indian status for the individuals of good character, which was a direct attack on the integrity of the Aboriginal community. This attempt to destroy the identity and the firm land base of the Aboriginal community was recognized and was resisted by Aboriginal people through a non-par ...
    Related: canadian society, south asian, canadian history, higher level, discussing
  • Spanishamerican War - 2,058 words
    Spanish/American War Spanish America PART ONE THE CONQUEST AND COLONIZATION OF THE SOUTHWEST 1 Legacy of hate: The conquest of Mexico's northwest A. The invasion of Texas-Not all the Anglo-Americans favored the conflict. Eugene C. Barker states that the immediate cause of the war was " the overthrow of the nominal republic by Santa Anna and the substitution of centralized oligarchy" which allegedly would have centralized Mexican control. Texas history is a mixture of selected fact and generalized myth. Historians admit that smugglers were upset with Mexico's enforcement of her import laws. B. The invasion of Mexico- In the mid-1840s, Mexico was again the target. The expansion and capitalist ...
    Related: work experience, doing business, mexican american, mobility, commerce
  • Terrorism - 1,148 words
    Terrorism Terrorism and Conceptual Problems International terrorism is the use of political violence to gain specific goals by force. These acts of terrorism may be practiced on individuals, governments, and religious groups. The purpose of terrorism is to promote terror, in that case, the population is force into fear and the delusions of death (Terrorism, International Microsoft (R) Encarta 1994.). United States has been maintaining the ominous terrorism acts by increasing security, high-tech devices detecting characteristics of a terrorist, and preventing fewer menacing attacks against the United States. International terrorism has been recurrent during the periods of political and social ...
    Related: counter terrorism, international terrorism, terrorism, animal rights, mass destruction
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