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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: immigration laws

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  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,246 words
    A Journey Though the "Golden Gates" of Promise Great controversy exists over the true promises of the "Golden Gates" in the United States. Discrimination occurs with different ethnic groups, but for those immigrants permitted into the country, the opportunities are excellent. The laws and practices established to control immigration into the United States limit the amount of poverty that can be present in the country. Without these important practices and laws created by the United States Congress, "cheap" labor would overpower American citizen labor and lead the country to an economic and social catastrophe. Although the United States is often criticized for its establishment of immigration ...
    Related: golden, promise, north america, east africa, testimony
  • A Journey Though The Golden Gates Of Promise - 2,284 words
    ... because, without them, the United States would become overpopulated and it would slowly deteriorate. If Congress did not create the quota laws as a way to control who is allowed to enter the country, it would leave the magnificent "Golden Gates" open to anyone who wanted to enter the promise land. It is insane to even consider letting everyone of every ethnicity into the United States because the results would be devastating for the American society. American citizens often criticize that the quota laws discriminate towards different ethnic groups, but, in reality, it is common sense to prefer letting immigrants into the country that are more likely to "fit in" with the cultures being p ...
    Related: golden, promise, another country, labor laws, reject
  • Australian Immigration Law - 1,059 words
    Australian - Immigration Law Australia is similar to America in many ways. They are both industrialized nations, they were both settled by the British, and they both have multi-ethnic societies. However, the two countries have vastly different immigration laws. In America, we will let almost anyone move here and work. An American immigrant can be from (almost) any country, race, or religion. Australia on the other hand, has had a much stricter policy determining who can move to their country. Australia's immigration law is ethnocentric in nature because it excludes anyone who is not of Anglo-Saxon descent. The policy is in the best interest for the British settlers, rather than in the best i ...
    Related: australian, australian government, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy
  • Childrens Iq - 763 words
    Childrens Iq INTRODUCTION The controversy of the IQ test has been going on since the time of Galton. We will take a look at the pros and the cons of IQ testing. IQ testing has been debated for a long time and we will take a look at the pros for IQ testing. A major reason why IQ testing is so widely used is that they are standardised, reliable and valid. IQ testing is a very good predictor on how children will do in school. Today's IQ testing are set up that there are certain tests for children and different tests for adults. The most widely used intelligence test for adults is the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale or the WAIS. And the most widely used children's IQ test is the Wechsler Intel ...
    Related: intelligence test, emotional intelligence, first world, strictly, intelligent
  • Diversity In The Workplace 8211 How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation - 1,986 words
    Diversity In The Workplace - How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Diversity in the Workplace - How Different Cultures Helped Shape Our Nation Today the United States of America is regarded as a global economic leader. The standard of living in the U.S. is higher than that of most other nations. Our nation is considered an economic super-power. Economic needs have often caused Americans to seek immigrants as workers, and economic opportunities have attracted foreigners. The United States is a nation of immigrants. Our nation has been shaped by successive waves of immigrants who have played major roles in our changing economy. The overwhelming majority of immigrants who enter the Uni ...
    Related: cultural diversity, different cultures, diversity, diversity in the workplace, workplace
  • Ethical Issues In Us Immigration Policies - 1,136 words
    Ethical Issues In U.S. Immigration Policies The sun seems unrelenting as it beats down on the two families huddled together in a rickety makeshift boat. The rafters have been floating in the open sea for what seems to them like years. Their food and water supplies have run out and the littlest ones cry out of hunger. But the keep going. Because they know that once their feet touch the land of opportunity their prayers will be answered. Finally, their raft makes it to the ankle-deep waters and they are only a few short steps away from dry land and freedom. As quickly as the wave of relief and happiness rushes over the rafters, so does it disappear. The Coast Guard is there and telling them th ...
    Related: ethical, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy, immigration problem
  • Ethical Issues In Us Immigration Policies - 1,086 words
    ... e by the then 82 year-old humanitarian Katherine Dunham. Also, according to the article, an outcry erupted from U.S. Catholic bishops who said it was morally irresponsible and morally questionable (America, 1992, p.1). The article also quotes the Catholic Archbishop Edward A. McCarthy who said, It is only natural that the refugees experience should spawn well-founded suspicions that the treatment received by Haitians is the result of institutional racism. Only 55 out of 9,000 Haitians are granted political asylum, while there is no publicly recorded case of any one of some 10,000 predominantly white Cuban boat people being denied admission (America, 1992, p.1). Another author argues that ...
    Related: ethical, ethical treatment, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration laws, immigration policy, social issues
  • Eugenics - 277 words
    Eugenics In the 1920s there was a movement, called the melting pot, to solve the social problems of the time with the use of technology. Eugenics is the use of science to solve social problems. A major leader in eugenics at the turn of the century was a man named Davenport. Kallikak studied eugenics too. He used case studies of individuals to show heredity. He showed how people inherited their bad and good traits from their family. Eugenics was mostly concerned with social traits. Social traits are traits individuals have that affect society. Pedigrees were used in eugenics to examine traits in families. Eugenics was promoted in magazines, books, state fairs, and movies in the beginning of t ...
    Related: eugenics, case studies, social problems, immigration laws, hitler
  • Illegal Immigrants - 297 words
    Illegal Immigrants Illegal immigrants from the country of Honduras will find out later this year if they will be allowed to stay in the U.S. as illegal immigrants. With the Clinton Administration switching over to the Bush Administration the answer is not clear of whether or not they will be allowed to stay in the country after July 5, 2001. This is when the Temporary Protection Status (TPS) law runs out and will find if they will be accepted or denied by the new administration. The fact that the Honduran immigrants have been allowed here already is a big plus in their favor. They also have other advantages in, Elaine Chao, an immigrant herself to the U.S. when she was just eight years old. ...
    Related: illegal, illegal immigration, bush administration, main theme, patrol
  • Immigration - 1,688 words
    Immigration To US For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States. Even with the new acts and laws that banned the older ones, no one can just walk right in and become a citizen. One must go through several examinations and tests before he or she can earn their citizenship. The Immigration Act of March 3, 189 ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, immigration reform, asia pacific, chinese exclusion act
  • Immigration - 903 words
    Immigration For many immigration to the United States would be a new beginning during 19th to early 20th century. There were many acts and laws to limit the number immigrating to the United States. Many of these acts were due to prejudice and misunderstanding of a culture. One such act was the Chinese Exclusion Act. Form this one act many immigration laws and acts were made against foreigners. They hoped to control the number of immigrants arriving on the American shores. The Chinese Exclusion Act of May 6, 1882 was just the beginning. This act was the turning point of the U.S. immigration policies, although it only directly affected a small group of people. Prior to the Chinese Exclusion Ac ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, chinese exclusion act, chinese immigrants, irish
  • Immigration: Should America Close The Golden Door - 1,654 words
    ... In the end a young immigrant population may very well save such programs as social security by increasing the number of workers in the market (Mont 18). These are all economic benefits, but the diversity the United States gains is a priceless commodity that future generations of Americans will need to succeed in a growing international job market. The Cost of Immigration The United States immigration policy does not allow people to immigrate if they are expected to be dependant on public services. Yet in 1993 approximately 12% of the 5.9 million recipients of Supplemental Security Income benefits were immigrants, even though they only account for about 5% of the population (Mont 15). Sta ...
    Related: america, golden, working poor, make money, searching
  • Interrogations Of Chinese Immigrants At Angel Island - 2,232 words
    Interrogations of Chinese Immigrants at Angel Island Chinese immigration, after being shut down for many years by governmental legislation and an anti- Chinese climate resumed quickly after 1906. The major earthquake and fire that occurred in San Francisco lent the Chinese immigrants a window of opportunity to regain entrance to America. Immigrants could now claim, without proof, that they were indeed the son or daughter of a citizen or a partner in a legitimate business. These paper sons and paper merchants increased the number of Chinese immigrants by an unbelievable rate. It was this supposed population explosion that would lead the United States to investigate all incoming Chinese immigr ...
    Related: angel, chinese, chinese family, chinese immigrants, chinese immigration, chinese women
  • Interrogations Of Chinese Immigrants At Angel Island - 2,166 words
    ... with particular scrutiny. These interrogations were particularly strenuous and the questioning extremely detailed. Examples abound of tricky questioning such as this line of questioning from docket #19431/1-2 (Box 1211 National Archives): Q. What is his occupation? A. I do not know. Q. Did he tell you what his occupation was? A. I did not ask him and he did not tell me. Q. Did he tell you he was a business partner of your husband? A. Yes; he said he was in business with my husband, and that when he departed he left the business with my husband. Q. Why a moment ago, did you state that you did not know what the native of the nature of the business was? (67). As demonstrated in this excerpt ...
    Related: angel, chinese, chinese immigrants, chinese people, chinese women, ellis island
  • Lifeboar Ethics - 1,036 words
    Lifeboar Ethics Garrett Hardins argument for the preservation of well-to-do societies is embodied by his extended metaphor of each society as a lifeboat with its members the lifeboats occupants. His presentation of this metaphor is key in his assertions that the creation of an international food bank, efforts to improve agriculture in foreign nations (the Green Revolution), and lax immigration laws will all result in universal tragedy. Hardins initial complaint is against humanitarian efforts to establish an international food bank, to which rich nations will contribute and from which poor nations will draw. Theoretically, accidents (famine, crop failure, etc.) should teach nations to plan a ...
    Related: ethics, world today, poor countries, green revolution, guilt
  • Love And Color - 1,747 words
    Love And Color Is love colorblind? Just three decades ago, Thurgood Marshall was only months away from appoint- ment to the Supreme Court when he suffered an indignity that today seems not just outrageous but almost incomprehensible. He and his wife had found their dream house in a Virginia suburb of Washington, D.C., but could not lawfully live together in that state: he was black and she was Asian. Fortunately for the Marshalls, in January 1967 the Supreme Court struck down the anti-interracial-marriage laws in Virginia and 18 other states. And in 1967 these laws were not mere leftover scraps from an extinct era. Two years before, at the crest of the civil-rights revolution, a Gallup poll ...
    Related: true love, mass media, karl marx, self esteem, unmarried
  • Love And Color - 1,752 words
    ... rely. When the subject has raised its ugly head, though, they've typically tossed out arbitrary ideas to explain a single piece of the puzzle, rather than address the entire yin and yang of black-white and white-Asian marriages. For example, a Japanese-American poetry professor in Minnesota has written extensively on his sexual troubles with white women. He blames the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Presumably, the similarity of frustrations of Chinese-American men is just a coincidence caused by, say, China losing the Opium War. And the problems of Vietnamese men stem from win- ning the Vietnam War, etc. But piecemeal rationalizations are unappealing com- pared to ...
    Related: good health, chinese american, american life, african, expert
  • May 1987 By Martin H Goodman Md This Essay Is In The Public Domain Introduction: Aids Is A Life And Death Issue To Have The A - 1,706 words
    (May 1987) By Martin H. Goodman MD (this essay is in the public domain) Introduction: AIDS is a life and death issue. To have the AIDS disease is at present a sentence of slow but inevitable death. I've already lost one friend to AIDS. I may soon lose others. My own sexual behavior and that of many of my friends has been profoundly altered by it. In my part of the country, one man in 10 may already be carrying the AIDS virus. While the figures may currently be less in much of the rest of the country, this is changing rapidly. There currently is neither a cure, nor even an effective treatment, and no vaccine either. But there are things that have been PROVEN immensely effective in slowing the ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, domain, goodman, martin
  • Spanishamerican War - 2,092 words
    ... Growers Assn, just to name a few. Railroads paid Mexicans the lowest industrial salaries ranging from 35cents to 39 cents an hour. Packing houses were higher at 45 to 47 cents, while in steel they earned 45 t0 50 cents. In the plants management Blacks and Mexicans were played against each other. In agricultural areas the White planted, irrigated, and cultivated, while Mexicans did heavier work of weeding, hoeing, thinning, and topping. The labor struggles of the 1920's proved that Mexicans were neither tractable nor docile. A marked rise in the consciousness of Mexican workers took place. F. Greasers Go Home: Mexican Immigration, the 1920s - Opposition to Mexican immigration came to a h ...
    Related: stock market crash, los angeles, happy days, cent, discriminative
  • Stranger From A Different Shore - 1,391 words
    Stranger From A Different Shore Struggling Strangers Strangers From A Different Shore by author/professor Ronald Takaki has brought a new perspective of my growing knowledge of the hardships and endless obstacles that Asian-Americans have struggled with through their immigration experience. Immigrants of Asia represent many countries and many different situations that have brought them to this better country with hopes for more opportunities to succeed. Asian-Americans are those whose roots are from Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Philippines, Japan, China, Cambodia, Korea, and Hmong to name the most common. Asian-Americans have overcome drastic situations to carry the status that they do today. Cu ...
    Related: different situations, shore, stranger, ethnic studies, pacific rim
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