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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: imagery

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  • Bird Imagery In Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man - 873 words
    Bird Imagery In Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man Bird Imagery in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man The works of twentieth-century Irish writer James Joyce resound vividly with a unique humanity and genius. His novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, published in 1916, is a convincing journey through the inner mind and spirit of Stephen Dedalus. Portrayed with incredible fluency and realism, imagery guides the reader through the swift current of growth tangible in the juvenile hero. Above all heavy imagery in the novel is the recurring bird motif. Joyce uses birds to ultimately relate Stephen to the Daedelus myth of the hawklike man; however, these images also exemplify Ste ...
    Related: artist, bird, imagery, portrait, portrait of the artist as a young man
  • Feminist Imagery In Joseph Conrads Heart Of Darkness - 1,243 words
    Feminist Imagery In Joseph Conrad's Heart Of Darkness Feminist Imagery in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness Many feminist critics have used Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness to show how Marolw constructs parallels and personification betwee women and the inanimate jungle that he speaks of. The jungle that houses the savages and the remarkable Kurtz has many feminine characteristics. By the end of the novel, it is the same feminized wilderness and darkness that Marlow identifies as being the cause of Kurtz's mental and physical collapse. In Heart of Darkness, the landscape is feminized through a rhetoric of personification. The landscape is constructed as an entity that speaks and acts, and i ...
    Related: darkness, feminist, heart of darkness, imagery, joseph, joseph conrad
  • Imagery - 797 words
    Imagery TAKE HOME TEST PART IV #5 IMAGERY Imagery is used throughout the Odyssey and the story of Oedipus. In the Odyssey, Odysseus is compared to objects, other people and animals. In the story of Oedipus, Oedipus is compared to riddles and objects. In the Odyssey, Odysseuss adventure brings him through many tragedies and hard time. His name is revealed in the story as being one who suffers. Toward the end of the story he is compared to a lion when he emerges victorious against the suitors and the maids are described as small animals scurrying away from him. He is described missing his wife as a shipwrecked swimmer misses the shore. His wife Penelope is described grappling Odysseus as a swi ...
    Related: imagery, european history, odyssey odysseus, important role, penelope
  • Imagery - 713 words
    Imagery Imagery Depicted Through T.S. Elliot's The Hollow Men The imagery depicted in T.S. Eliot's poem The Hollow Men evokes a sense of desolate hopelessness and lends to Eliot's generally cynical view of civilization during this period in history. A reaction of deep and profound disappointment in mankind around him is made evident in this poem, first published in 1925. In this short piece, Eliot lists several deep faults he finds in his fellow human beings, including hypocrisy, insensability and indifference. Overall Elliot leaves the reader with a feeling of overwhelming emptiness. An important feature of this poem is the fact that the narration of the poem is in first person. This establ ...
    Related: imagery, first person, human beings, t. s. eliot, profound
  • Imagery - 2,396 words
    IMAGERY The term imagery has various applications. Generally, imagery includes all kinds of sense perception (not just visual pictures). In a more limited application, the term describes visible objects only. But the term is perhaps most commonly used to describe figurative language, which is as a theme in literature. An example is animal imagery in Othello When Iago tortures Othello with animal images of his wife's supposed infidelity, "were they as prime as goats, as hot as monkeys" (3.3.403), his description so overcomes the Moor that later, in greeting Lodovico, he suddenly blurts out, "Goats and monkeys!" (4.1.256). SIMILE A direct, expressed comparison between two things essentially un ...
    Related: imagery, love song of j alfred prufrock, king herod, dylan thomas, literature
  • Imagery - 2,411 words
    ... ading of a poem, examining the work for meter. Meter is a regular pattern of unstressed and stressed syllables in a line or lines of poetry. BLANK VERSE A Blank Verse is a poem written in unrhymed iambic pentameter. Consider the following from The Ball Poem by John Berryman: What is the boy now, who has lost his ball, What, what is he to do? I saw it go Merrily bouncing, down the street, and then Merrily over-there it is in the water! COUPLET A Couplet is a stanza of two lines, usually rhyming. The following by Andrew Marvell is an example of a rhymed couplet: Had we but world enough and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. QUATRAIN Quatrain is a four-line stanza which may be rhymed ...
    Related: imagery, step approach, rhyme scheme, john donne, venetian
  • Imagery In The Red Badge Of Courage - 2,668 words
    Imagery In The Red Badge Of Courage Imagery The cold passed reluctantly from the earth, and the retiring fogs revealed an army stretched out on the hills, resting. As the landscape changed from brown to green, the army awakened, and began to tremble with eagerness at the noise of rumors. It cast its eyes upon the roads, which were growing from long troughs of liquid mud to proper thoroughfares. A river, amber-tinted in the shadow of its banks, purled at the army's feet; and at night, when the stream had become of a sorrowful blackness, one could see across it the red, eyelike gleam of hostile camp-fires set in the low brows of distant hills. Once a certain tall soldier developed virtues and ...
    Related: badge, courage, imagery, red badge of courage, religious education
  • Imagery In The Red Badge Of Courage - 2,619 words
    ... ering upon it. He tried to mathematically prove to himself that he would not run from a battle. Previously he had never felt obliged to wrestle too seriously with this question. In his life he had taken certain things for granted, never challenging his belief in ultimate success, and bothering little about means and roads. But here he was confronted with a thing of moment. It had suddenly appeared to him that perhaps in a battle he might run. He was forced to admit that as far as war was concerned he knew nothing of himself. A sufficient time before he would have allowed the problem to kick its heels at the outer portals of his mind, but now he felt compelled to give serious attention to ...
    Related: badge, courage, imagery, red badge of courage, good lord
  • Macbeth: Imagery - 555 words
    Macbeth: Imagery In his plays, Shakespeare uses many forms of imagery. Many forms of his imagery are used in his play `Macbeth,' including the forms of clothing and darkness. Each detail in his imagery, it seems to me, contains an important symbol of the play, and symbols that we must understand if we are to understand either the passage it is in, or the play as a whole. In `Macbeth' I think that the imagery of clothing is used to suggest that throughout the play, Macbeth is seeking to hide his "disgraceful self" from his eyes and from others. I think that Shakespeare wants to keep alive the ironical contrast between the wretched creature that Macbeth really is and the disguises he assumes t ...
    Related: imagery, shakespearean tragedy, lady macbeth, conclude, witches
  • The Scarlet Letter Plant Imagery - 717 words
    The Scarlet Letter - Plant Imagery Throughout the novel, Hawthorne uses plant imagery to symbolize both the negative and positive character traits and to set the mood of the novel. The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne takes place during the age of Puritanism in Boston where a young and attractive Puritan woman commits adultery with the Reverend Mr. Dimmesdale. Chillingworth, Hesters husband, whom everyone thought was captured by Indians comes to town, but only Hester knows his true identity. Chillingworth vows to figure out who Hesters lover is and he succeeds. Ultimately, this novel contains deception and guilt which is in the form of plant imagery. Hawthorne uses many different negat ...
    Related: imagery, plant, scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter
  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,288 words
    13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tolerant of violence on stage than we are? In addition to the visible bloodletting, there is endless discussion of past gory deeds. Offstage violence is even brought into view in the form of a severed head. It's almost as though such over-exposure is designed to make it ordinary. At the same time, consider the basic topic of the play, the usurpation of the crown of England and its consequences. These are dramatic events. They can support the highly charged atmosphere of bloody actions on stage as well as off. By witnessing Clarence's murder, which has been carefully set up, we develop a greater revulsion for its instigator. And even though we ar ...
    Related: term paper, children play, queen elizabeth, historic, victorious
  • A Comparison And Contrast Of Lord Of The Flies And Heart Of Darkness - 398 words
    A Comparison and Contrast of Lord of the Flies and Heart of Darkness Achebe uses positive tone in his description of the African jungle; whereas, Conrad makes use of negative connotations. Their portrayals of the jungle reflect their attitudes toward their subject; Achebe sees it as a hospitable home whereas Conrad sees a tragic trap. Conrad utilizes words with negative connotations, such as Arioted, Amob, Avengeful, and Agloom to portray the jungle as an inauspicious place. He makes use of diction such as, "Whether it meant war, peace, or prayer we could not tell..." to further portray the jungle as an Aunknown planet," a place of hostile unfamiliarity. Conrad feels the "white man's burden" ...
    Related: comparison, contrast, darkness, flies, heart of darkness, lord of the flies
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • A Comparison Of The Themes Of Thomas Wyatt And Henry Howard - 745 words
    A comparison of the themes of Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard Both Henry Howard and Thomas Wyatt made significant contributions towards the development of English literature during the reign of King Henry VIII. Through their translations of Petrarchs work, these men were responsible for introducing sonnet form into English. "Both Wyatt and Surrey helped to change the nature of English poetry,"(textbook, p.187). They both traveled to Italy and borrowed, as well as imitated other poets and each other. Instead of originating fresh themes, they repeated conventional subject matter, mainly focusing on idealized love. Works from both poets had similar themes of confusion, sadness, and reflection. Bo ...
    Related: comparison, henry viii, howard, king henry, king henry viii, main theme, thomas wyatt
  • A Line Of Promises - 1,314 words
    A Line Of Promises A Line of Promises Many times simple objects in peoples lives can come to represent a part of themselves. The object can become an integral part of a persons identity. In Wedding-Ring by Denise Levertov, the relationship between a woman and her old wedding ring is explored as a way to intertwine the womans life with the rings meaning. Through the ring, the woman identifies herself. The wedding ring is wishfully transformed from a complex symbol of promises to a simple gift of friendship. In the opening of Wedding-Ring, Levertov sets the tone of the poem, by exemplifying the interaction between the speakers feelings and the wedding ring. My wedding ring lies in a basket / a ...
    Related: true value, power over, negative aspects, abandoned, bright
  • A New Forest To Conquer - 1,120 words
    ... ew forest, the more foreign her home began to appear. When she would go back to visit her parents, the places that she used to find familiar seemed strange; the trees seemed too far apart and the watchful eye of the predators became more and more oppressive . Polly stayed very close friends with Petey while they were apart. Even though they had gone to new forests, very far from each other, the nest building techniques they were learning in their new homes were very similar. They began to realize that they were finally beginning to agree on the proper way to build a nest and, despite their long separation; they finally decided that they should build a nest together. However, just before ...
    Related: conquer, forest, early childhood, small town, metaphor
  • A Place Worth Fighting For - 294 words
    A Place Worth Fighting For A Place Worth Fighting For Colin Chisholm's emotive plea for restraint in the development of the Squaw Valley ski area is particularly poignant and compelling. The power of the piece is found in his dramatic and impassioned scene setting. He cleverly intertwines the imagery of the valley with endearing anecdotes of the time he and his family spent there establishing a subconscious link between the two main focuses of the piece. By the time Chisholm begins to develop the conflict in the story, the relationship between the valley and his family has been established. He wants the reader to associate the fate of the forest with that of his mother and father. On page 79 ...
    Related: meadow, environmentalism, link
  • A Rose For Emily - 755 words
    A Rose For Emily The Impact of Imagery The use of imagery in a short story has a great deal of effect on the impact of the story. A story with effective imagery will give the reader a clear mental picture of what is happening and enhance what the writer is trying to convey to the reader. William Faulkner exhibits excellent imagery that portrays vivid illustrations in ones mind that enhances, A Rose for Emily. The following paragraphs will demonstrate how Faulkner uses imagery to illustrate descriptive pictures of people, places and things that allow Faulkner to titillate the senses. It was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled ba ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, short story, william faulkner
  • A Stereotypical Media - 1,258 words
    A Stereotypical Media A Stereotypical Media The media of todays society plays the peddler to the stereotypes that plague our country. However, the media is not solely to blame. Susan Sontag states in her essay The Image World: Through being photographed, something becomes part of a system of information, fitted into schemes of classification and storage(Sontag 196). Through our own demand as consumers, the use of advertising in television, newspapers, and especially magazines relays to the public an erratic system of stereotypical information. The system of information relayed through photographic imagery in advertising directly affects the thoughts of society, on how a woman should look and ...
    Related: media, stereotypical, american worker, men and women, plant
  • A Style Consistent With The Message - 487 words
    A Style Consistent With The Message Redemption of the spirit and soul, Eternity, Heaven, and Hell have always been solemn, undisclosed, and indirect subjects. Such important matters of life deserve a more appropriate approach. These subjects need to be clearly understood and firmly discussed. They are extremely urgent and must be elaborately explained to all that they may concern. In "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," Jonathan Edwards extensively enhances the urgency of turning lives over to God through a provocative style filled with vivid illustrations and elaborate imagery. One recognizes that the style of this work is extremely aggressive and graphic. Edward's word choice is quite n ...
    Related: consistent, writing style, jonathan edwards, profound, withdraw
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