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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: illegal drugs

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  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    Abortion Almost half of American women have terminated at least one pregnancy, and millions more Americans of both sexes have helped them, as partners, parents, health-care workers, counselors, friends. Collectively, it would seem, Americans have quite a bit of knowledge and experience of abortion. Yet the debate over legal abortion is curiously abstract: we might be discussing brain transplants. Farfetched analogies abound: abortion is like the Holocaust, or slavery; denial of abortion is like forcing a person to spend nine months intravenously hooked up to a medically endangered stranger who happens to be a famous violinist. It sometimes seems that the further abortion is removed from the ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, legalizing abortion, nineteenth century, control laws
  • Alcohol Related Crashes - 801 words
    Alcohol Related Crashes "Alcohol related crashes are the leading cause of deaths for teens," states Dr. Mark S. Gold of Fair Oaks Hospital. It's drinking that harms or endangers the drinker or other people. Drinking and driving is an extremely dangerous form of alcohol abuse. Teenage drinking may cause fights with family and friends, sometimes ending in injuries or death. Loss of coordination and judgment makes drinkers accident prone. Teenage arrests for drunkenness or creating a disturbance are not only embarrassing but they can also mean a damaging arrest record (7). Teenage alcoholism is a serious problem which destroys the lives of many adolescents. In order to understand the controvers ...
    Related: alcohol, alcohol abuse, drugs and alcohol, lexington books, peer pressure
  • Ancient Art Of Parenthood - 1,602 words
    Ancient Art Of Parenthood Children walk home from school every day and never realize what lurks beyond their protected space (Miller 105). In todays world the acceptance of latch key children should not be tolerated. Unfortunately, our society condones such behavior from the adults. As a result, these children wear a chain around their neck with a house key attached, in order to enter into their home. As the youngsters leave school, they enter a silent world (Kay 94). To illustrate, children enter into an empty house which has been abandoned since breakfast that morning. Therefore, television when turned on, replaces the absence of their parents. At this time, children experience serious con ...
    Related: ancient art, parenthood, human race, illegal drugs, regard
  • Athletes In Trouble - 1,084 words
    ... the sport or even the school may take place. Theres a belief that the use of illegal drugs and performance-enhancing drugs, and abuse of alcohol constitute a threat to the integrity of intercollegiate athletics. It also creates a danger to the health and the careers of the student-athlete. As soon as a student athlete joins and decides to participate in an inter-collegiate team, the war begins for the coaches and their staff to keep their players on the right track and not let them get caught up in the state of mind that every athlete is more likely to engage in the drug abuse than non-athletes. And also that drugs are not the answer to a lot of their questions. To prevent the problem a ...
    Related: college athletes, student athletes, steroid use, football players, odds
  • Athletes Lifes Drugs And Violence - 1,505 words
    Athletes Lifes - Drugs And Violence Heroes with Double Lives Some Athletes in society today are considered heroes despite their double lives. Their drug use and violence are brushed aside while leading their teams to victory Who is your hero? If that question was asked to a group of people, some might think of loved ones or family, and some may talk about doctors, firemen, or even a teacher. However, most would probably say their hero was some celebrity or star athlete. While some celebrities and athletes can justifiably be labeled heroes, there are some people who may appear to be heroic, but lead a completely different life off the field. Even movies in Hollywood mirror this double lifesty ...
    Related: drugs, illegal drugs, violence, football players, sexual assault
  • Athletes Salaries - 1,972 words
    Athletes Salaries What should athletes deserve to be paid? Many players have risen to stardom by becoming a professional athlete. Athletes have come from many different backgrounds; some from wealthy and some from poverty raised backgrounds. Salaries are continuing to rise, and money doesn't seem to be an issue. Athletes are getting what they want from the owners by negotiating through their agents. Athletes' salaries aren't from their owners, but they come from other sources ("Athletes' Salary"). Athletes get paid an extremely high salary for the work they do, and should consider the value of their work. They do not deserve the extreme amount they get paid and something should by done about ...
    Related: last year, chicago tribune, high school, basketball, teams
  • Boot Legger Version 20 Legalize Drugs - 1,293 words
    Boot Legger Version 2.0 (Legalize Drugs) I go to Tulane and received an A+ on this paper. You cant tell if a boy or girl wrote it either. Good Luck Bootlegger: Version 2.0 Prohibition will work great injury to the cause of temperance for it goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a mans appetite by legislation and make a crime out of things that are not a crime. A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principle upon which our government was founded Abraham Lincoln On January 16, 1920 the Eighteenth Amendment was ratified by thirty-six states and became part of the Constitution. The intention of this new amendment was to lower alcohol consumption by Americans. At ...
    Related: boot, drug addicts, drug legalization, drug offenders, drug prohibition, drugs, illegal drugs
  • Business Law - 1,058 words
    ... hip after giving six-month's notice to each general partner. 15.Mitch is a limited partner in a limited partnership. He discovers that the general partners have failed to file a certificate of limited partnership. What should Mitch do? 16. The legal existence of a corporation is unaffected by the death of all of its shareholders. T/F 17.Harger Corporation, a Tennessee Corporation, owns a factory in Indiana. It sells its products in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Indiana. It maintains a sales office in Madison, Indiana for the purpose of making contracts, coordinating deliveries of its products, keeping a record of sales and deliveries, and paying salaries. Is the Harger Company required to qua ...
    Related: business law, freedom of information act, federal trade, personal computer, holder
  • Compare And Contrast - 970 words
    Compare And Contrast Bridging the Generation Gap Between Teens in the 60s and Teens in the 90s Throughout history many generations have been named after something that describes them in every way. The decade from 1960 to 1970 is definitely one of those eras and it became known as the Counter Culture Era (The Hippie Generation). It was known as the Counter Culture Era because the young people involved in it rejected the old-fashioned American values and lifestyles. The youth was no longer satisfied with being replicas of the generation that preceded them. Instead, young people longed for change. The changes affected lifestyles, values, laws, education, and entertainment. The dream of love, pe ...
    Related: compare, compare and contrast, contrast, social issues, transmitted diseases
  • Consumer Health - 1,543 words
    Consumer Health Is Consumer Health and Safety in Jeopardy With the implementation of Self-Prescription Drug Internet Sites? Amanda C. Feitner GUS 72-001: Urban Affairs-Consumers In the Marketplace: Your Legal Rights and Responsibilities. Prof. John E. Kelly, J.D. April 17, 2000 The expeditious augmentation of consumer product transactions taking place on the Internet have developed new risk for the public's health and safety, especially with the rise of online self-prescription drug sites. Online Pharmacies have been created to benefit the consumer but pose many risks for credulous purchasers, increased health fraud, and unique challenges to regulators, law enforcement, and policymakers. Wit ...
    Related: consumer, consumer product, health, health care, health care professionals, health concerns, health issues
  • Crime And Prostitutes - 925 words
    Crime and Prostitutes Prostitution is ambiguous to define. The Macquarie dictionary defines prostitution as 1. the act or practice of engaging in sexual intercourse 2. any base or unworthy use of talent, ability, etc. But the act of prostitution involves many other associated facets that are included under this extensive act. There's the act itself, soliciting, advertising, pimping, house brothels, street prostitution, phone sex and even computer sex. Sweden treats prostitution as legal, however pimping is illegal. Canada bans soliciting for prostitution, but not the act themselves. Except for a few places in Nevada, the United States bans prostitution but permits its advertisement and toler ...
    Related: crime, social environment, legal definition, university press, commercial
  • Drug Abuse In The United States Of America, We, The People Value Several Things, Some Of Which Are Freedom, Expanding And Tak - 566 words
    DRUG ABUSE in the United States of America, we, the people value several things, some of which are freedom, expanding and taking care of our families and our financial security. We, the people, take such things for granted. We also discourage some behavior, such as crime, laziness and use of illegal drugs. Drug abuse is one of the most discouraged behaviors in our country. Use of illegal drugs is harmful to the user and all those with whom the user comes in contact. There are over 40 million illegal drug users in the world today and America is the biggest market for drugs. There are more drug dealers in this country, than there are dentists. Illegal drug abuse must be stopped; it hurts our s ...
    Related: abuse, drug abuse, expanding, illegal drug, united states of america
  • Drug Legalazation - 1,952 words
    Drug Legalazation A LOOK AT DRUG LEGALIZATION John Hardwick Philosophy 305 Louisiana Tech University February 21, 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Table of Contents 1 A Look at Drug Legalization 2 Bibliography 9 1 2 A LOOK AT DRUG LEGALIZATION The United States is by far the richest and most powerful country in the world. We citizens take for granted luxuries that people of other countries can only dream. Yet in our society there are serious social issues that for reasons unknown are not being addressed. One of the most important issues that typical politicians are afraid to address is that of what to do with the nations illegal drug problems. Although we hear terms like The War on Drugs and Dr ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug addicts, drug laws, drug legalization, drug policy, drug prohibition, drug treatment
  • Drug Legalization - 784 words
    Drug Legalization Just say no? This is not exactly the philosophy that the vast majority of the United States population tends to follow. Drugs have become a routine aspect of everyday life in the United States. Neither a gigantic metropolis nor a minute town have gone without feeling the everlasting effects of drugs. Drug use has always posed a major dilemma for America to overcome. The banning of illegal drugs takes many back to the days of the Prohibition problems involving the banishment of alcohol. Prohibition obviously did not work in the 1920s, and some modern day people feel that making drugs legal would solve the constantly rising drug problem. In his article Facing up to Drugs: Is ...
    Related: drug legalization, drug problem, drug smuggling, legalization, writing techniques
  • Drug Testing - 1,601 words
    Drug Testing Drug testing is a laboratory procedure that looks for evidence of drug consumption by analyzing urine, blood, and hair samples. If tested, you must provide a sample in front of an observer to make sure that it is not tampered with. Samples are then sent to a laboratory for analysis, after which the employer is notified of the results (Wodell 1). Exactly who should be subject to the new trend of mandatory drug tests, is the big question being raised among businesses, schools, athletes and federal government employees. Businesses feel that random drug testing of their employees will create higher productivity, save on health care costs, improve employee turnover, prevent less acci ...
    Related: drug and alcohol abuse, drug testing, illicit drug, testing, pope john paul
  • Drug Testing - 1,438 words
    ... ays Morphine 2 to 4 days Methamphetamine 2 to 4 days Valium 30 days (Bina 124) Today many companies are doing what the FBI has been doing for years, using hair follicle testing as a means of drug screening. Hair follicle testing is a drug testing method that is perhaps, less demeaning, less invasive, and less likely to be tampered with than the well-known urine test. Although, it is more reliable than urine testing it has its problems that need to be addressed. It is necessary for one to understand how hair grows to be able to understand the testing procedure. Hair grows within a small cavity known as the hair follicle. Hair growth occurs when cells divide in the matrix near the bottom o ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug testing, testing, illegal drugs, legal issues
  • Drug Testing - 1,153 words
    Drug Testing The ethics of drug testing has become an increased concern for many companies in the recent years. More companies are beginning to use it and more people are starting more to have problems with it. The tests are now more than ever seen as a way to stop the problems of drug abuse in the workplace. This brings up a very large question. Is drug testing an ethical way to decide employee drug use? It is also very hard to decide if the test is an invasion of employee privacy. The ethical status of workplace drug testing can be expressed as a question of competing interests, between the employers right to use testing to reduce drug related harms and maximize profits, over against the e ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug testing, testing, right to privacy, illegal drugs
  • Drug Testing - 1,446 words
    Drug Testing Drug testing in the United States began with the explosive use of illegal drugs, in order to curb drug abuse. This began during the Vietnam War with drug use at a climax. In general, Drug testing is a way to detect illegal drug use and deter it, usually by Urinalysis. Drug testing in the United States violates a citizens right to unreasonable search and seizures along with jeopardizing ones freedom. Drug testing is not only an unreliable invasion of a persons privacy but it assumes that one is guilty before submitting to the test. Drug testing began to take place in the mid 1960s when drugs like Marijuana, hallucinogens and other drugs were becoming widespread (Stencel, pp.201). ...
    Related: drug abuse, drug control, drug free workplace, drug test, drug testing, illegal drug, national drug
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