Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: illegal aliens

  • 25 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Controlling Immigration To The Us - 958 words
    Controlling Immigration to the U.S. With the many different groups of people coming to this country in search of a better life, we should cut back on who we should allow to have citizenship. There are thousands of immigrants coming to the U.S. every day. A lot of these immigrants are illegal aliens coming to the U.S. to find jobs. Whenever we catch illegals crossing our borders, we should send them right back and that would be the end of the story. Instead we are bringing them to camps to wait until the government finds out what to do with them. With so many immigrants coming over everyday, the U.S. lets people out of these camps and let them into our society so we can fit the new people who ...
    Related: controlling, immigration, main problem, state department, romano
  • Coyote In Tortilla Curtain - 1,096 words
    Coyote In Tortilla Curtain The Coyote In The Tortilla Curtain by T. Coraghessan Boyle, the author repeatedly draws parallels between the actual coyote and the figurative coyote. Boyle uses the actual coyote to show how the animal actually is. In this novel the coyote acts as a symbol for many things. Boyle parallels the figurative coyote with Jose Navidad who is portrayed as the bad character in the novel. Boyle also uses the coyote to parallel the illegal immigrants and the way the coyote lives. Candido is one of the main characters in the novel that is an illegal Mexican and is paralleled to the coyote. Boyle points out how the coyote is symbolic of illegal aliens. He also shows the meanin ...
    Related: coyote, curtain, tortilla, angeles county, illegal aliens
  • Economics Of Immigration - 1,216 words
    ... free-rider problem applies to the situation of illegal immigration since these immigrants make use of public goods while not paying income taxes. One major problem of illegal immigration involves the fact that illegal immigrants do not spread out evenly across the nation. They concentrate in certain areas, and the destination states that they choose, like California, pay a heavy toll. U.S. households, in general, end up paying an enormous amount of money because of illegal aliens. A study has found that illegal immigrants drain about 2 billion dollars a year for incarceration, schooling, and Medicaid from destination states such as Texas, California, and Florida. In California for examp ...
    Related: economics, illegal immigration, immigration, legal immigration, national review
  • Fluctuating Immigration Policy And The Economy - 1,956 words
    Fluctuating Immigration Policy And The Economy During the various decades of 1920 to 1960, immigration policy toward Mexicans was influenced by America's economic status at each decade. During this period there was much fluctuation in attitudes and policies toward immigration. America saw immigration policy go from an almost invisible border in the 1920's to massive military-like roundups of immigrants in the 1950's. During the 1920's while the Immigration act of 1924 was all but halting European and Asian immigration, thousands of Mexicans were allowed to cross the border without any trouble from the new anti-immigration legislation so that Mexicans could work seasonally in the fields. When ...
    Related: american immigration, asian immigration, economy, immigration, immigration policy
  • Honduras - 1,572 words
    Honduras Located in middle Central America, Honduras is a tropical country named after the depth of the water along the northern border of the Caribbean Sea (Lexis Nexis). Nicaragua to the South and Guatemala and El Salvador to the West border Honduras. The climate in Honduras varies depending upon the region. Along the coast the weather is hot and dry, yet, in the mountain ranges it stays cool the whole year round. Honduras is the third poorest country in the world. There are few corporations, universities, and land for the citizens to settle on in Honduras, causing many citizens to immigrate to other countries to find new opportunities. Due to the lack of employment, education, and land, H ...
    Related: honduras, new jersey, american immigration, english language, stream
  • Illegal Immigration And The Economy - 1,295 words
    Illegal Immigration And The Economy Illegal Immigration and the Economy Illegal immigration has become one of the key political issues of the 1990s, especially in border states such as California. The Bureau of the Census estimates that there are now 4 million illegal aliens living in the United States and that about 300,000 more settle permanently each year. Four million illegal immigrants is undeniably a large number of people, but it is far below the invading army of 8 million 10 million aliens regularly reported in the media and by anti-immigrant lobbyists. Illegal aliens constitute only about 1.5 percent of the 260 million people living in the United States. Myopic and xenophobic Americ ...
    Related: economy, global economy, illegal, illegal aliens, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy
  • Immigrants - 1,601 words
    Immigrants Should the United States take on more immigrants? Is the United States hurting from immigration problems? These issues have been debated on for generation. "According to the Immigration and Naturalization Service, approximately 300,000 illegal immigrants enter the United States annually" (Cozic 12). This large number of immigrants causes many different emotions. For some Americans, immigration is an adversity. Many Americans past and present have reacted to immigrants with fear: fear of unemployment and lower standards of living, fear of different religions and races, fear that immigration is spoiling the U.S. for those already here. The issues of immigration has three important t ...
    Related: naturalization service, demand curve, constitutional right, legalizing, environmental
  • Immigration - 1,424 words
    Immigration The first immigrants to the territory now the United States were from Western Europe. The first great migration began early in the 19th century when large numbers of Europeans left their homelands to escape the economic hardships resulting from the transformation of industry by the factory system and the simultaneous shift from small-scale to large-scale farming. At the same time, conflict, political oppression, and religious persecution caused a great many Europeans to seek freedom and security in the U.S. The century following 1820 may be divided into three periods of immigration to the U.S. During the first period, from 1820 to 1860, most of the immigrants came from Great Brit ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration reform, religious persecution
  • Immigration - 991 words
    ... than that. A common belief is that aliens fulfill many of the least desirable jobs. However, most experts agree that in todays economy, there is no shortage of Americans competing for many of these same jobs. Actually, many Americans already work in these low-paying jobs. For example: the poor black woman, who works as a seamstress, Her boss asked her to train a new employee, an illegal immigrant. As soon as she finished training her new charge, she was fired. Her position, of course, went to the illegal immigrant, who was willing to work for less pay, and under deplorable working conditions. This is one example of how illegal workers depress wages, and slow, stall or prevent unionizati ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, legal immigration, social services, orange county
  • Immigration - 325 words
    Immigration What could be more captivating than an oasis in a desert with green foliage, cool fresh water, and succulent fruits? An oasis is a paradise to a fatigued, dehydrated, and hungry person who must survive in the desert. The United States is the oasis, the paradise to immigrants who live in other countries in undesirable conditions. The preferred land where shelter, water, and food are plentiful. Unfortunately, not everyone can live in paradise. A limited number of immigrants should be allowed into the United States with consideration towards the current population, employment, and an imposed immigration tax. Overcrowding will destroy a paradise. The population growth must be monitor ...
    Related: immigration, population growth, illegal aliens, overcrowding, citizenship
  • Immigration - 1,688 words
    Immigration To US For many, immigration to the United States during the late 19th to early 20th century would be a new beginning to a prosperous life. However there were many acts and laws past to limit the influx of immigrants, do to prejudice, such as the Chinese Exclusion Act. Later on into the 20th century there would be laws repealing the older immigration laws and acts making it possible for many more foreigners to immigrate to the United States. Even with the new acts and laws that banned the older ones, no one can just walk right in and become a citizen. One must go through several examinations and tests before he or she can earn their citizenship. The Immigration Act of March 3, 189 ...
    Related: immigration, immigration laws, immigration reform, asia pacific, chinese exclusion act
  • Immigration - 791 words
    Immigration Immigraton in the U.S. While immigration has played an important role in the building and formation of America, new federal laws have resulted in mass immigration. Throughout history, Congress has enacted laws and has had to amend them to control the flow of both legal and illegal migration to the United States. In 1948, legislation was first enacted in an effort to control the number of applicants fleeing persecution; it permitted 205,000 refugees to enter the United States. In 1952, Congress set in place major regulations setting parameters and quotas mostly for the eastern hemisphere and leaving the western hemisphere unrestricted. In 1953, congress was again faced with having ...
    Related: immigration, immigration reform, legal immigration, mass immigration, criminal justice
  • Immigration Problem - 1,986 words
    Immigration Problem The world has gone through a revolution and it has changed a lot. We have cut the death rates around the world with modern medicine and new farming methods. For example, we sprayed to destroy mosquitoes in Sri Lanka in the 1950s. In one year, the average life of everyone in Sri Lanka was extended by eight years because the number of people dying from malaria suddenly declined. This was a great human achievement. But we cut the death rate without cutting the birth rate. Now population is soaring. There were about one billion people living in the world when the Statue of Liberty was built. There are 4.5 billion today. World population is growing at an enormous rate. The wor ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration problem, legal immigration
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,221 words
    Immigration Problem in the U.S. The first move stopping immigration decided by Congress was a law in 1862 restricting American vessels to transport Chinese immigrants to the U.S. The Alien Contract Labor Laws of 1885, 1887, 1888, and 1891 restricted the immigration to the U.S. of people entering the country to work under contracts made before their arrival. Alien skilled laborers, under these laws, were allowed to enter the U.S. to work in new industries. By this time anti-immigrant felling rose with the flood of immigrants and in this period the anti-Catholic, anti-foreign political party the Know-Nothings, was already born. After World War I a marked increase in racism and the growth of is ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform
  • Immigration Problem In The Us - 1,111 words
    ... he problem. Faster citizens processing, helping illegals country's economy such as NAFTA which is already in affect. Some suggest tamper proof residency cards, computerize the I.N.S., increases the number of boarder patrol agents, and build a wall around the U.S. and problem countries. There has been many suggestions made in dealing with this problem. The Gallegly bill is one of them. If ever completed by House-Senate conferees, is likely to include several conditions already adopted in similar form by both chambers. As passed by the House and Senate, the bill would: Increase the number of border patrol agents by 1,000 each year between 1996 and 2000, roughly doubling the force to reach ...
    Related: american immigration, illegal immigration, immigration, immigration policy, immigration problem, immigration reform, legal immigration
  • Immigration To Us - 509 words
    Immigration To US Immigration has held a major role in shaping our country. Immigrants have provided many things such as customs, manufacturing, inventions, and entertainment. Many people today don't realize how greatly we have been affected by immigration. A survey was given to ten people. The survey contained a list of people who were all immigrants. When asked how many actually were, only one person got the question right. Old Immigration occurred between 1840-1890. Immigrants during this time period came from countries such as Ireland, Germany, and Scandinavian countries (Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland). Next came the period of New Immigration. These newcomers came from Italy, Russ ...
    Related: illegal immigration, immigration, total number, illegal aliens, citizenship
  • Immigration: Should America Close The Golden Door - 1,654 words
    ... In the end a young immigrant population may very well save such programs as social security by increasing the number of workers in the market (Mont 18). These are all economic benefits, but the diversity the United States gains is a priceless commodity that future generations of Americans will need to succeed in a growing international job market. The Cost of Immigration The United States immigration policy does not allow people to immigrate if they are expected to be dependant on public services. Yet in 1993 approximately 12% of the 5.9 million recipients of Supplemental Security Income benefits were immigrants, even though they only account for about 5% of the population (Mont 15). Sta ...
    Related: america, golden, working poor, make money, searching
  • Ku Klux Klan - 619 words
    Ku Klux Klan Michael Vieira Sociology 5/12/00 The Ku Klux Klan The KKK is a movement that has been very controversial since the Civil War. The Klan as they call themselves was created as a result of the occupation of Federal troops in the South. The KKK's purpose at the time was to provide the people of the south with the leadership to bring back the values of Western Civilization that was taken from them. In the 1920's the Klan had its most popular era. At this time the KKK was the most active politically then it has ever been in history. The KKK still exists today as a brotherhood and a new White racial community that lives and functions by the ideals it promotes. Today the Klan is in its ...
    Related: klan, klux, klux klan, ku klux klan, economic nationalism
  • Mexican Mistreatment - 1,174 words
    Mexican Mistreatment Americans take many things for granted. For the majority of the population, life is relatively mild. People are normally not rich, but not poor, not ecstatically happy, but not too depressed either. One might say that the population generally has it easy, as compared to a large percentage of the rest of the world. It is for this reason that a great many people from other countries immigrate here. They are seeking a better life. Often, however, they get mistreated. Like the Mexican immigrants, who arrive here, only to be treated unfairly because of few opportunities, American prejudice, and Americanization. They do not come here to do harm, or to take advantage of America ...
    Related: mexican, mexican americans, mexican border, mistreatment, minimum wage
  • Stereotypes In Media - 1,614 words
    Stereotypes In Media My topic will address how minorities and women are misrepresented in the media and how they are stereotyped. I plan to show how minorities and women are depicted or stereotyped unfairly in the news, on television, and in general. In an article from USA Today magazine, it illustrated that if you have watched, listened to, and read media all your life, you probably have filed these images into your thinking process: African-Americans are mostly rap stars, professional athletes, drug addicts, welfare mothers, criminals and/or murderers; Latinos are illegal aliens, ignorant immigrants who take, but give little back to the country and can't even speak the language, or drug-cr ...
    Related: media, media coverage, soap operas, personal relationships, history
  • 25 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2