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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ignorance

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  • Aids Whats New Is The Message Getting Through We Already Know Enough About Aids To Prevent Its Spread, But Ignorance, Complac - 1,708 words
    AIDS - What's new ? ------------------- Is the message getting through? We already know enough about AIDS to prevent its spread, but ignorance, complacency, fear and bigotry continue to stop many from taking adequate precautions. We know enough about how the infection is transmitted to protect ourselves from it without resorting to such extremes as mandatory testing, enforced quarantine or total celibacy. But too few people are heeding the AIDS message. Perhaps many simply don't like or want to believe what they hear, preferring to think that AIDS "can't happen to them." Experts repeatedly remind us that infective agents do not discriminate, but can infect any and everyone. Like other commun ...
    Related: aids, whats, human cells, blood cells, usual
  • Education: Evolution Or Ignorance - 1,419 words
    Education: Evolution Or Ignorance Throughout recent history creationists and evolutionists have argued whether evolution should be a part of America's public education. Whether evolution is science fact, or science fiction. Evolution being a science based on statistics has some faults, although many concepts in science or math do. The process of learning about evolution is a necessary part of a well-rounded student's education due to the fact that it is a statistically proven science and removing it in turn revokes certain student's rights. In a student's academic career that a student is most likely at one time or another going to have to take a science class. Science, being the main topic ...
    Related: biological evolution, evolution, evolution and creationism, ignorance, teaching evolution, theory of evolution
  • Ignorance And Racism - 1,006 words
    Ignorance and Racism Ignorance and Racism Joseph Conrad develops themes of personal power, individual responsibility, and social justice in his book Heart of Darkness. His book has all the trappings of the conventional adventure tale - mystery, exotic setting, escape, suspense, unexpected attack. Chinua Achebe concluded, "Conrad, on the other hand, is undoubtedly one of the great stylists of modern fiction and a good story-teller into the bargain" (Achebe 252). Yet, despite Conrad's great story telling, he has also been viewed as a racist by some of his critics. Achebe, Singh, and Sarvan, although their criticisim differ, are a few to name. Normal readers usually are good at detecting racism ...
    Related: ignorance, racism, joseph conrad, heart of darkness, differ
  • Ignorance By Moby Dick - 815 words
    Ignorance By Moby Dick Ignorance is seen every day of our lives. Even people in the 1850s were aware of ignorance. Ignorance is defined as being uneducated or resulting from or showing lack of knowledge. Ignorance can be taken to extremes though. There is complete ignorance where the person thinks that even though they do not understand it all they still know everything. Then others of us say that even though I am not sure about it I am knowledgeable to my ignorance. In Moby Dick, Ishmaels ignorance can be related to my own in some ways. "The more I pondered over this harpooner, the more I abominated the thought of sleeping with him. It was fair to presume that being a harpooner, his linen o ...
    Related: dick, ignorance, moby, moby dick, grand central
  • The Apology Of Socratesthemes Death Sophists Ignorance - 1,188 words
    The Apology Of Socrates--Themes Death Sophists Ignorance The Apology of Socrates In Athens between 429347 B.C. a trail took place against Socrates where Plato made a speech in front of a council of 500 members. Plato wrote the Apology because Socrates was sentenced to death for dissuasion against state religion and corrupting young people. In the beginning, it seems like he is trying to split his accusers into two groups (old and new) to show that he has been accused many years of his life and the new accusers should be the only ones looked at because the old accusers did not appear in court. He was also allowed to cross-examine his accusers and make his own defense (Mack 502). Usually, at t ...
    Related: apology, ignorance, online encyclopedia, microsoft corporation, wiser
  • Philosophy - 476 words
    Fig. 1 is my own interpretation and illustrations of the idea of founder K.Matsushita that is applied in the actual business management. Outermost circle represents business activity, such as development, production, sales, and administration, i.e., the actual work itself. They are, however, based on the deeper structure, that is the management control system, which is composed of various mechanisms based on divisional system. Now, those systems are again structured in order to achieve management philosophy that is laid even underneath. This management philosophy is the basic way of thinking of the company, or sense of value in the company. It is to question, for example, in a little grandio ...
    Related: philosophy, management control, business & management, human happiness, originated
  • 1984 - 749 words
    1984 In the world of 1984, Winston rebels against the party, but not only does he do it in a different ways but his displeasure with the society leads him on to rebel numerous times. First of all, Winston has committed a "thought crime", a crime which is used to prevent the individual from thinking and the penalty for committing a thought crime was death (so he thought). Winston knew he was guilty for the crime but at the same time he assumes that he is not going to be detected or caught, at least in he beginning. One thing Winston did was keeping a diary. A diary was of the more serious thought crimes. In his diary, it is pointed out of his sexual frustrations, along with the displeasure of ...
    Related: 1984, book reports, different ways, eleventh edition, penalty
  • 1984 - 957 words
    1984 1984 The story 1984, by George Orwell, is set in the fictional country Oceania, in what is thought to be the year 1984, which consists of the Americas, the British Isles, Australia and part of Africa. The part of Oceania in which 1984 takes place is referred to as Air Strip One and is formerly England. Winston, the protagonist of the story, is faced with a conflict of extreme hatred against the ultimate antagonist, Big Brother. Big Brother is the leader of the political party of Oceania who controls not only actions, but also thoughts through the thought police and what are called "telescreens." Winston falls in love with a girl by the name of Julia, and the two of them must decide on w ...
    Related: 1984, point of view, big brother, official language, brien
  • 1984 - 1,015 words
    1984 1. Biography George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, a British writer with political conscience. He was born in India but educated in England at Eton College. He served the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922 to 1927. In sick health, he returned to Europe to live in poverty as a struggling writer. Orwell joined the Republican forces in the Spanish civil war, and wrote a chilling account of this experience. He went on to write many books, mostly autobiographical, and achieved successes as a brilliant writer. 2. Synopsis The novel takes place in a theoretical and fictional dystopian totalitarian society. The story begins in London on April 4, 1984 after an atomic world w ...
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  • 1984 - 249 words
    1984 The lesson to be learned from George Orwell's 1984 is that an "ideal" of having a Utopian society will never really work. George Orwell may have written 1984, in order to show us that every society has it's ups and downs and that no matter how hard you work to keep the society perfect there will always be flaws. In the book 1984, the society in which the people lived was completely opposite to what most people would see as "utopia". As defined by the New Scholastic Dictionary the word "Utopia" means: a place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. This is far from the life that the people lived in 1984. There was a lot of hate throughout the book, and with hate comes unhappin ...
    Related: 1984, utopian society, main character, george orwell, lesson
  • 1984 - 1,513 words
    1984 Nineteen Eighty-Four is a compelling novel, written in the period just after W.W.II. It details the life of one man, Winston Smith, and his struggles with an undoubtedly fascist government. The book is set approximately in the year 1984, in which Winston's society is ruled by a governing force known as The Party. At the head of this government is a fictional figure known as Big Brother, to whom all citizens must love and respect. In this society, privacy and freedom do not exist. People are constantly monitored by telescreens, and subjected to a constant barrage of propaganda. Any devious thought or action is dealt with by cruel and deadly punishment. Winston is a worker in one of the g ...
    Related: 1984, government agencies, specific purpose, big brother, history
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    ... hidden beneath the dark mustache. O cruel, needless misunderstanding! O stubborn, self-willed exile from the loving breast! Two gin-scented tears trickled down the sides of his nose. But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finished. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. This shows the power that the Party and OBrien has had over Winston; they have taken his old understanding and beliefs and transformed them into an attitude that complies with those of the Party. The conditioning of an individual for a utopian society often results in the repression of individuality. Both novels attempt to create a utopian society. The major thing that holds t ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, utopian society, breast feeding
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 1,076 words
    1984 By George Orwell In the novel 1984 by George Orwell, a character named Winston Smith goes through a painful, mind altering experience with tragic results. Winston is forced to betray the woman he loves. From love and commitment to hate and deception, Winston enters the road most traveled by the mighty characters of 1984. The novel is a disturbing and twisting journey which is not realistic. Winston, the protagonist, betrays his beliefs and one true love by accepting what the all-powerful Big Brother and OBrien have to say. As one can read the slogan of Oceania they may understand the twisted ideas of this novel: WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH The novel 1984 revo ...
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  • 1984 Vs Animal Farm - 1,278 words
    1984 Vs. Animal Farm 1984 vs. Animal Farm 1984, by George Orwell, is a very powerful drama which involves man and totalitarian society. It is a story of a lonely rebel whose only valuable is his mind and who later conspires with another in an attempt to separate from their increasingly dominant hate-infested society. In 1984, Orwell depicts the susceptibility of today's society and its possibility of becoming a realm of lies. In it, the masses live in constant fear, being monitored at all times. He also admonishes the fact that this society can be in store for us in the future. The main theme of 1984 is that without independent thought and freedom, corruption can and will transform decent or ...
    Related: 1984, animal farm, farm, main theme, leon trotsky
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
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  • 65279 It Is Unusual When A Masterpiece Develops Out Of An Assignment, But That Is, More Or Less, What - 1,904 words
    It is unusual when a masterpiece develops out of an assignment, but that is, more or less, what happened in the case of Gullivers Travels. The Martinus Scriblerus Club proposed to satirize the follies and vices of learned, scientific and modern men. Each of the members was given a topic, and Swifts was to satirize the numerous and popular volumes describing voyages to faraway lands. Ten years passed between the Scriblerus project and the publication of Gullivers Travels, but when Swift finished, he had completed a definitive work in travel literature. Moreover, he had completed what was to become a childrens classic (in its abridged form) and a satiric masterpiece. Swifts main character, Gul ...
    Related: masterpiece, unusual, make sense, time passes, principal
  • A Comparison And Contrast Of Lord Of The Flies And Heart Of Darkness - 398 words
    A Comparison and Contrast of Lord of the Flies and Heart of Darkness Achebe uses positive tone in his description of the African jungle; whereas, Conrad makes use of negative connotations. Their portrayals of the jungle reflect their attitudes toward their subject; Achebe sees it as a hospitable home whereas Conrad sees a tragic trap. Conrad utilizes words with negative connotations, such as Arioted, Amob, Avengeful, and Agloom to portray the jungle as an inauspicious place. He makes use of diction such as, "Whether it meant war, peace, or prayer we could not tell..." to further portray the jungle as an Aunknown planet," a place of hostile unfamiliarity. Conrad feels the "white man's burden" ...
    Related: comparison, contrast, darkness, flies, heart of darkness, lord of the flies
  • A Comparison Of Macbeth And Crime And Punishment - 1,336 words
    A Comparison of Macbeth and Crime and Punishment Shakespeares Macbeth and Dostoevskys Crime and Punishment explore the psychological depths of man. These two works examine tragedy as represented through the existential beliefs of many philosophers. Existentialist theory expresses the idea that man can satisfy his own needs, regardless of social codes, if he has the energy and ambition to act. Both Macbeth and Raskolnikov have the ambition to act, but each struggles internally with their actions, frightened of the consequences. Although these works examine the tragedy and remorse of Macbeth and Raskolnikov, the idea of a driving force within each character remains evident. Ultimately, William ...
    Related: comparison, crime, crime and punishment, macbeth, punishment
  • A Dolls House And Tess Of The Durbevilles - 497 words
    A Doll's House and Tess of the D'Urbevilles A Doll's House and Tess of the D'Urbevilles During the late nineteenth century, women were beginning to break out from the usual molds. Two authors from that time period wrote two separate but very similar pieces of literature. Henrik Ibsen wrote the play A Doll's House, and Thomas Hardy wrote Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Ibsen and Hardy both use the male characters to contrast with their female counterparts to illustrate how women are stronger by following their hearts instead of their minds. Ibsen uses Torvald, to depict a world where men choose to follow their minds in place of their hearts. Ibsen has Torvald believe that he is truly in love with ...
    Related: a doll's house, dolls house, tess, tess of the d'urbervilles, nineteenth century
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