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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: anthology

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  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Holiday For The Virgins - 522 words
    A Holiday For The Virgins A Holiday for the Virgins. John Keats was born in LondoꗬGЉ ሀ က Ѐ ᷶ Bibliography 橢橢�� Љ ␦ 돬 돬 ೻ ? ? ? ] ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ˜ ŵ ĺ ļ $ ɯ Ǵ s; and became a licenced druggist. ( ) Keats earliest poems date from 1814. In 1816 John Keats, gave up his medical training and devoted himself full time to a literary career. In 1820 Keats became ill with tuberculosis. The illness may have been aggravated by the emotional strain of his attachment to Fanny Brawne, a young woman with whom he had fallen in love( ). Nevertheless, the period from 1 ...
    Related: holiday, young woman, john keats, selected poems, nicholas
  • A Slaves Life - 1,645 words
    A Slave's Life Imagine, if you will, rising earlier than the sun, eating a mere "snack"- lacking essentially all nutritional value - and trekking miles to toil in the unforgiving climate of the southern states, and laboring until the sun once again slipped under the horizon. Clad only in the rags your master provided (perhaps years ago), you begin walking in the dark the miles to your "home." As described by the writers Jacob Stroyer and Josiah Henson, this "home" was actually a mere thatched roof, that you built with your own hands, held up by pathetic walls, over a dirt floor and you shared this tiny space with another family. Upon return to "home," once again you eat the meager rations yo ...
    Related: slave labor, created equal, founding fathers, significant other, livestock
  • A Triumphent Withdrawal - 1,409 words
    A Triumphent Withdrawal A Triumphent Withdrawal I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain-and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. Acquainted with the night, by Robert Frost Anthology of American Literature (1010) Edward A. Robinson was the first most important poet of the Twentieth Century. He is a peoples poet his poems' characters often provide physiological portraits of fictional and historical characters suffering an isolation of some sort (990). Robinson is considered a transitional figure; he is the precursor of Modernist poetry. He uses the older traditional influences of form and rhyme and his poems are often simple and neat. However, in ...
    Related: withdrawal, best friend, robert frost, human experience, depth
  • Aaron Douglas - 1,128 words
    Aaron Douglas People may ask, what other than a tornado can come out of Kansas? Well, Aaron Douglas was born of May 26, 1899 in Topeka, Kansas. Aaron Douglas was a "Pioneering Africanist" artist who led the way in using African- oriented imagery in visual art during the Harlem Renaissance of 1919- 1929. His work has been credited as the catalyst for the genre incorporating themes in form and style that affirm the validity of the black consciousness and experience in America. His parents were Aaron and Elizabeth Douglas. In 1922, he graduated from the University of Nebraska School of Fine Arts in Lincoln. Who thought that this man would rise to meet W.E.B. Du Bois's 1921 challenge, calling fo ...
    Related: aaron, douglas, negro history, american experience, breath
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,195 words
    ... is casual dialogue ironically, as a was to underscore the chilling truth about the old south, that it was a society where perfectly "nice" people didn't consider the death of a black person worth their notice. Because of his upbringing, the boy starts out that slavery is part of the natural order; but as the story unfolds he wrestles with his conscience, and when the crucial moment comes he decides he will be damned to the flames of hell rather than betray his black friend. And Jim, as Twain presents him, is hardly a caricature. Rather, he is the moral center of the book, a man of courage and nobility, who risks his freedom risks his life -- for the sake of his friend Huck. (Swalden 2) ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn
  • Alexander Popes The Rape Of The Lock - 1,658 words
    Alexander Pope's The Rape Of The Lock The Rape of the Lock: Serious Stuff Alexander Pope's mock heroic epic The Rape of the Lock appears to be a light subject addressed with a satiric tone and structure. Pope often regards the unwanted cutting of a woman's hair as a trivial thing, but the fashionable world takes it seriously. Upon closer examination Pope has, perhaps unwittingly, broached issues worthy of earnest consideration. The Rape of the Lock at first glance is a commentary on human vanity and the ritual of courtship. The poem also discusses the relationship between men and women, which is the more substantial matter in particular. Pope examines the oppressed position of women. Infring ...
    Related: alexander, lock, pope alexander, popes, rape
  • Ana Castillo - 573 words
    Ana Castillo Chicana poet and writer Ana Castillo was born and raised in Chicago, but has spent most of her writing career studying her Mestiza heritage. In her first novel, The Mixquiahuala Letters (1986), Castillo explores the relationship between two women who travel to Mexico in search of a better understanding of their place in both the U.S. and Mexican societies. The novel, written in the form of letters between the two women, is considered the landmark novel that made Castillo a leading Chicana feminista writer, winning the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation. Castillo's interest in race and gender issues can be traced through her writing career, culminating in Mas ...
    Related: castillo, american book, before columbus, gender issues, segment
  • Anarchism And Liberalism - 1,399 words
    ... st groups to represent the labor force, minority groups, and any apathetic and helpless citizens. The presence of sub-government groups, such as big industry, are recognized as being insufficient in representing the public's interest and so the liberals call for more regulations to control these sub-governments from abusing their power. This goes right along with the whole philosophy of contemporary liberals in that they don't want to start over and rebuild the government, but rather reform it and ad more regulations to control it. The idea of a ruler goes against the basic stance of anarchism. Proudhon best describes this view when he said, "Whoever puts his hand on me to govern me is u ...
    Related: anarchism, contemporary liberalism, liberalism, free society, individual rights
  • Animals In Romantic Poetry - 569 words
    Animals In Romantic Poetry Animals in Romantic Poetry Many Romantic poets expressed a fascination with nature in their works. Even more specific than just nature, many poets, such as William Blake, Robert Burns, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge all seemed fascinated with animals. Animals are used as symbols throughout poetry, and are also used to give the reader something to which they can relate. No matter what the purpose, however, animals played a major part in Romantic Poetry. William Blake used animals as basic building blocks for poems such as "The Lamb" and "The Tyger." By using these carefully selected animals to depict good and evil, the reader truly understands Blake's words. All reader ...
    Related: poetry, romantic, romantic poetry, romantic poets, narrative poem
  • Assyrian Art - 1,110 words
    Assyrian Art Assyrian Art The reliefs from the palace of King Assurnasirpal II at Nimrud play an important role in portraying the power and importance of the Assyrian king. These reliefs are similar to other Assyrian reliefs in terms of their purpose; however, there is a contrast in the methods used to glorify the king. By examining such factors as style, iconography and historical significance, we find many similarities and differences between the "ceremonial" reliefs and the more common reliefs depicting war and hunting. The reliefs belonging to the sacred or"ceremonial" category consist of panels depicting a sacred tree, a human headed genius fertilizing a sacred tree, a griffin fertilizi ...
    Related: assyrian, historical significance, art history, methods used, deity
  • Athena - 1,216 words
    Athena Athena Back in time when Greece was making its mark in history as one of the great civilization of the Ancient World, there was a great deal of emphasis on the Gods and Goddesses. To the Greeks the world was governed by the Gods and they were the reason many things happened in the world, mostly thing that where unexplainable. The goddess Athena was one of the many gods or goddesses that played a large role in Greek mythology. Even though Athena was the patron saint of Athens she supported other Greeks outside of Athens, such as, Achilles, Orestes, and especially Odysseus (Athena-1). Athena is know to be the goddess of war, guardian of cities, patroness of arts and crafts, and promoter ...
    Related: athena, goddess athena, pallas athena, world wide, world wide web
  • Barbaulds Prophecy And Blakes Imagination - 1,136 words
    Barbauld's Prophecy And Blake's Imagination Barbauld's Prophecy and Blake's Imagination The Romantic Era was a time of widespread cultural, social, and political reform. Industrialization was taking the place of the agrarian lifestyle, which introduced problems such as higher poverty, a larger segregation of class, and overworking of both adults and children. The wars in America and France paved the way for political upheaval by introducing new ways of thinking and radicals who wanted change. With all of this turmoil and chaos many writers turned to escapism, which involved both imagination, and prophecy. Imagination and prophecy are merely two ways the writers of this time thought, hence, b ...
    Related: imagination, prophecy, william blake, works cited, western world
  • Bartleby The Scrivener - 547 words
    Bartleby- The Scrivener In Herman Melville's "Bartleby the Scrivener", the author uses several themes to convey his ideas. The three most important themes are alienation, man's desire to have a free conscience, and man's desire to avoid conflict. Melville uses the actions of an eccentric scrivener named Bartleby, and the responses of his cohorts, to show these underlying themes to the reader. The first theme, alienation, is displayed best by Bartleby's actions. He has a divider put up so that the other scriveners cannot see him, while all of them have desks out in the open so they are full view of each other, as well as the narrator. This caused discourse with all of the others in the office ...
    Related: bartleby, bartleby the scrivener, scrivener, heath anthology, the narrator
  • Beowulf And Achilles - 1,198 words
    Beowulf And Achilles Beowulf is a story about a man named Beowulf who desired fame and fortune in life. The Iliad had a character named Achilles who is similar to Beowulf because he also desired glory. But they are two completely different stories written at different times and different places by different people. Both stories have unique qualities such as dragons in one and multi-gods in the other and that is what makes fictitious stories like these classics. Since achieving fame is a goal of these two characters, and since these are great works of literature, people can relate to wanting to be famous in life. So this essay is about Beowulf and Achilles and what they went through to be fam ...
    Related: achilles, beowulf, the monster, norton anthology, aeneas
  • Birth Mark By Hawthorne - 535 words
    Birth Mark By Hawthorne Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a time of great change in America. In the mid-nineteenth century, Americans began to experience a shift in focus from the once stringent religious outlook to a more scientific view of the world and its natural wonders. Americans, however, did look at these new scientific discoveries with much hesitation, questioning their long-term effects on society as a whole. Hawthorne s work, "The Birth Mark echoes these sentiments and combine natural faith with a confidence in science to make a very interesting tale. This tale and its morality convey a message to the reader that there is a price for tampering with the natural order of things. This story ...
    Related: hawthorne, mark, nathaniel hawthorne, natural order, term effects
  • Blakes Songs Of Innocence And Experience Analysis - 701 words
    Blake's Songs Of Innocence And Experience Analysis In William Blakes Songs of Innocence and Experience, the gentle lamb and the dire tiger define childhood by setting a contrast between the innocence of youth and the experience of age. The Lamb is written with childish repetitions and a selection of words which could satisfy any audience under the age of five. Blake applies the lamb in representation of youthful immaculateness. The Tyger is hard-featured in comparison to The Lamb, in respect to word choice and representation. The Tyger is a poem in which the author makes many inquiries, almost chantlike in their reiterations. The question at hand: could the same creator have made both the ti ...
    Related: innocence, songs, william blake, wesley longman, little lamb
  • Candid By Voltaire - 1,349 words
    Candid By Voltaire Francois-Marie Arouet de Voltaire, in his satirical masterwork Candide, critiques both society and humanity wit little mercy. The author obviously seeks to expose all of the human race's self-deceptions and weaknesses, but he does so with great humor. Voltaire gives delight with his humor while planting the deeper message about the fallibility and corruption of humanity. This contradiction holds the power of Voltaire's writing. Candide provides a horrific portrait of the human condition, but it does so with preposterous and outlandish humor. Voltaire especially intends to criticize the popular idea of his era that sees a rational order in the world: "Voltaire shows how the ...
    Related: candid, voltaire, human condition, francois marie arouet, critiquing
  • Canterbury Tales - 1,005 words
    ... ee, nor of his wif." (55-56) and the miller pays heed to this warning, suppressing curiosity of "Goddes privetee" as regards the flood and trusting his wife so much as to leave her alone and independent while he travels on his business. This blind acceptance of 'Goddes' mysteries and his wife's deceit leads to his metaphoric and literal downfall when the tale comes to it's climax, as the miller falls from the roof, and again, literally and metaphorically waking up to find his wife having had sex with another man. The miller's wife Alison is another character that is represented using this same process of creating a stereotypical figure and then adding flaws and perversions. Alison is pre ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, the knight
  • Captain John Smith - 501 words
    Captain John Smith John Smith had many characteristics that helped to make him an important person in the beginning settlement of the New World. He was a brave and strong person who seemed to have little fear. He ran away from home when he was young and became a soldier in Europe and the Near East (Barbour). He thrived for excitement and adventure. During the settlement of Jamestown, he took on the responsibility of leadership by saving the colony from starvation (Microsoft). He made the men plant crops and build houses, while he was trading with the Indians for food (Microsoft). The colony chose him President of the Jamestown settlement. The settlers believed and trusted him because he had ...
    Related: captain, captain john, captain john smith, john smith, smith
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