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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: idealist

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  • A Room With A View By Ed Forster - 617 words
    A Room with a View by E.D. Forster Opening a Window A Room with a View by E.D. Forster explores the struggle between the expectations of a conventional lady of the British upper class and pursuing the heart. Miss Lucy Honeychurch must choose between class concerns and personal desires. Honeychurch is a respectable young lady from a well-known family. She travels with Miss Charlotte Bartlett to Italy at the turn of the century. In Italy they meet Mr. Emerson and George Emerson. George is young man who falls in love with Lucy. Mr. Emerson is an idealist and a dreamer. Only a couple of days after they get to Italy George kisses Lucy while standing in the middle of a waving field of grass. Georg ...
    Related: forster, love story, upper class, passionate, beethoven
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,719 words
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich's thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to activism, and to the writing of poetry. Writing poetry, above all, involves a willingness to let the unconscious speak - a willingness to listen within for the whispers that tell of what we know, even thou ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, natural order, unconscious mind, feminism
  • Amenhotep Iii - 1,385 words
    Amenhotep Iii Amenhotep IV ascended the throne of Egypt following the death of his father, Amenhotep III. This new ruler proved to be different in almost every way from both his predecessors and the pharaohs who ruled after him. The purpose of this essay is to present the issues of religion, art, architecture, literature and foreign policy in relation to the rule of this unique pharaoh. Newby (1980) states that the most noticeable difference rested in the religious beliefs of Amenhotep IV. In the past, Egypt had worshipped many gods, but under this new pharaohs rule, polytheism would be replaced by a religion that believed in a single god. In one of his first decisions as pharaoh, Amenhotep ...
    Related: amenhotep, art & architecture, military action, high priest, history
  • Buddhism - 1,718 words
    Buddhism Buddhism is one of the major religions of the world it was founded by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, who lived in northern India from c.560 to c.480 BC. The time of the Buddha was a time of social and religious change, the development of trade and cities, the breakdown of old tribal traditions, and the rise of many new religious movements that answered the demands of the times. These movements came from the Brahmanic tradition of Hinduism but were also reactions against it. Of the new sects, Buddhism was the most successful and eventually spread throughout India and most of Asia. Today Buddhism is divided into two main branches. The Theravada, or "Way of the Elders," the more conse ...
    Related: buddhism, mahayana buddhism, tantric buddhism, tibetan buddhism, changing world
  • Caesar - 922 words
    Caesar Expository Essay The decisions that one man makes can determine the length of life. Rome has many people that have the characteristics to be great leaders. Antony is a manipulative man, Brutus is an honorable man, and Octavius is a quiet strength. All three men would do an excellent job in leading Rome. Antony is a manipulative man. This is shown throughout the play in several cases, but most prominently at Caesars funeral. I thrice presented him a kingly crown which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition? (III, ii, 96-96). Antony is very cleaver in the way that he presents his case to the people. He uses rhetorical questioning to show the people that Caesar was in fact not ambitious ...
    Related: caesar, great leaders, leadership qualities, octavius, referring
  • Candide By Voltaire 1694 1778 - 1,727 words
    Candide by Voltaire (1694 - 1778) Candide by Voltaire (1694 - 1778) Type of Work: Satirical novel Setting Europe and frontier South America; mid-eighteenth century Principal Characters Candide, a naive young man Pangloss,Candide's tutor and philosopher friend Cunegonde, the beautiful daughter of a baron Cacambo, Candide's servant and companion Martin, a later traveling companion Story Overveiw Candide, the illegitimate son of a Baron's sister, was sent to live with the Baron at his beautiful castle in Westphalia. The Baroness weighed about three hundred and fifty pounds, as therefore greatly respected, and did the honors of the house it had digniy which rendered her still more respect. Her d ...
    Related: candide, voltaire, self defense, eighteenth century, satisfied
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,043 words
    Catcher In The Rye The Catcher in The Rye Many people find that their dreams are unreachable. Holden Caulfield realizes this in J.D. Salingers The Catcher in the Rye. As Holden tells his story, he recounts the events since leaving the Pencey School to his psychiatrist. At first, Holden sounds like a typical, misguided teenager, rebellious towards his parents, angry with his teachers, and flunking out of school. However, as his story progresses, it becomes clear that Holden is indeed motivated, just not academically. He has a purpose: to protect the young and innocent minds of young children from the horrors of adult society. He hopes to freeze the children in time, as wax figures are frozen ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, the catcher in the rye, young children, holden caulfield
  • Catcher In The Rye Character Analysis Of Holden - 2,065 words
    ... tors, both commenting on the problems of their times, and both novels have been recurrently banned or restricted (Davis 318). John Aldrige remarked that both novels are "study in the spiritual picaresque, the joinery that for the young is all one way, from holy innocence to such knowledge as the world offers, from the reality which illusion demands and thinks it sees to the illusion which reality insists, at the point of madness, we settle for" (129). Harvey Breit of The Atlantic Bookshelf wrote of Holden Caulfield: "(He) struck me as an urban, a transplanted Huck Finn. He has a colloquialism as marked as Huck's . . . Like Huck, Holden is neither comical or misanthrope. He is an observer ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, character analysis, character study, holden, holden caulfield, main character
  • Das Kapital By Karl Marx 1818 1883 - 1,554 words
    Das Kapital by Karl Marx (1818 - 1883) Das Kapital by Karl Marx (1818 - 1883) Commentary In the mid-nineteenth century, when Karl Marx wrote Das Kapital - an exhaustive work of more than one thousand pages - factory conditions were often intolerable, wages were at best barely adequate, and there were few groups or governments who advocated reform. Therefore, Marx took it upon himself to define "Capitalism,,, explain and condemn Capitalist methods, predict the inevitable doom of the system, and issue the rallying cry, "Workers of the world, unite!" When Marx simply describes what he sees, his analyses and criticisms appear most lucid. In contrast, his theories become confusing as he attempts ...
    Related: das kapital, karl, karl marx, marx, social classes
  • Death Of A Salesman Willy - 1,281 words
    Death of a Salesman - Willy The differences between eighteenth-century literature and romantic poems, with respect to history is constituted here. This is seen through the influential works of John Keats and Alexander Pope. These works are acknowledged as, "The Rape of Lock" and "The Eve of St. Agnes." Alexander Pope takes his readers on a hatred filled epic. A robust piece of literature and love induced psychoses in, "The Rape of Lock." On the other hand, "The Eve of St. Agnes" told a tale of life, love, death, and eternal fate in heaven. These two brilliant writers have given two magnificent poems. Pope exhibits many characteristics of a narcissistic human being. His independence in life s ...
    Related: death of a salesman, salesman, willy, john keats, gothic style
  • Discrimination - 1,717 words
    Discrimination Discrimination The struggle for social and economic equality of Black people in America has been long and slow. It is sometimes amazing that any progress has been made in the racial equality arena at all; every tentative step forward seems to be diluted by losses elsewhere. For every Stacey Koons that is convicted, there seems to be a Texaco executive waiting to send Blacks back to the past. Throughout the struggle for equal rights, there have been courageous Black leaders at the forefront of each discrete movement. From early activists such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B. DuBois, to 1960s civil rights leaders and radicals such as Martin Luther King, Ma ...
    Related: discrimination, racial discrimination, black experience, civil rights, folk
  • Disillusionment Depression Despair These Are The Burning Emotions - 919 words
    Disillusionment. Depression. Despair. These are the burning emotions churning in young Hamlet's soul as he attempts to come to terms with his father's death and his mother's incestuous, illicit marriage. While Hamlet tries to pick up the pieces of his shattered idealism, he consciously embarks on a quest to seek the truth hidden in Elsinore; this, in stark contrast to Claudius' fervent attempts to obscure the truth of murder. Deception versus truth; illusion versus reality. In the play, Prince Hamlet is constantly having to differentiate amongst them. However, there is always an exception to the rule, and in this case, the exception lies in Act 2, Scene 2, where an "honest" conversation (san ...
    Related: burning, despair, disillusionment, figurative language, young hamlet
  • Don Quixote - 520 words
    Don Quixote Madman or Idealist? In my judgement, Don Quixote is and idealist. He lives in a time of Machiavellian beliefs and wants to escape these characteristics. He fantasizes about the way things used to be in the times of the knights, and the code of Chivalry, and wishes that he too could live in this time period. Some may argue that he was a madman due to his attack on the windmills, but he just seems to suffer from a slight mental illness, which does not in turn qualify him as a madman. Don Quixada is a man of about fifty years old; he was born of nobility and therefore, could not get a job after his wealth was spent. At this age it did not seem that he had much of a future, the major ...
    Related: don quixote, quixote, sancho panza, mental illness, accomplish
  • Don Quxiote - 419 words
    Don Quxiote Don Quixote: Renaissance humor with a modern translation A Spanish knight, about fifty years of age, gave himself up so entirely to reading the romances of chivalry, that in the end they turned his brain, and nothing would satisfy him but that he must ride abroad on his old horse, armed with spear and helmet, a knight-errant, to encounter all adventures, and to redress the innumerable wrongs of the world. As is the case in this epic tale by Cervantes, modern man is not immune to prolonged sustained suggestion. All irony criticizes the imperfect ideas and theories of mankind, not by substituting for them other ideas and other theories, less imperfect, but by placing the facts of l ...
    Related: romance novels, video games, high school, renaissance, laughter
  • Egoism Thomas Hobbes - 1,684 words
    Egoism Thomas Hobbes Egoism There is no word more generally misinterpreted than the word egoism, in its modern sense. In the first place, it is supposed to mean devotion to self interest, without regard to the interest of others. It is thus opposed to altruism - devotion to others and sacrifice of self. This interpretation is due to the use of the word thus antithetically by Herbert Spencer. Again, it is identified with hedonism or eudaimonism, or epicureanism, philosophies that teach that the attainment of pleasure or happiness or advantage, whichever you may choose to phrase it, is the rule of life. Modern egoism, as propounded by Stirner and Nietzsche, and expounded by Ibsen, Shaw and oth ...
    Related: egoism, hobbes, thomas hobbes, herbert spencer, power over
  • Elizabethan Drama - 2,729 words
    Elizabethan Drama Beyond New Historicism: Marlowe's unnatural histories and the melancholy properties of the stage Drew Milne The tradition of the dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the minds of the living. [1] There is no document of culture which is not at the same time a document of barbarism. And just as such a document is not free from barbarism, barbarism also taints the process of transmission ... [2] Recent critical discussions of Elizabethan drama, above all of Shakespeare, have centred around `new historicism', a trend consolidated in critical anthologies.[3] New historicism is characterised by an interest in the historicity of texts and the textuality of history, and by a ...
    Related: drama, elizabethan, elizabethan drama, historical drama, different approaches
  • Emersonian Individualism - 1,491 words
    Emersonian Individualism Emerson's "transcendentalism" is essentially a romantic individualism, a philosophy of life for a new people who had overthrown their colonial governors and set about conquering a new continent by their own lights. Though Emerson is not a technical philosopher, the tendency of his thought is toward idealist metaphysics in which soul and intuition, or inspiration, are central. The new American experiment needed every idea within its reach. Taking a practical and democratic, yet poetic interest in all of nature and in individuals of every walk of life, Emerson stresses the potential for genius and creativity in all people. It is a source of creative insight within whic ...
    Related: emersonian, individualism, century europe, common sense, philosophy
  • From The Dream To The Womb - 1,355 words
    From The Dream To The Womb From the Dream to the Womb: Visionary Impulse and Political Ambivalence in The Great Gatsby It seems hard to believe in our period, when a three-decade lurch to the political Right has anathematized the word, but F. Scott Fitzgerald once, rather fashionably, believed himself to be a socialist. Some years before, he had also, less fashionably, tried hard to think himself a Catholic. While one hardly associates the characteristic setting of Fitzgerald's novels, his chosen kingdom of the sybaritic fabulous, with either proletarian solidarity or priestly devotions, it will be the argument of this essay that a tension between Left and religiose perspectives structures t ...
    Related: dream, womb, roaring twenties, greek philosophy, largely
  • George Berkley: His View Of God - 1,262 words
    George Berkley: His View Of God George Berkeley: His View of God As man progressed through the various stages of evolution, it is assumed that at a certain point he began to ponder the world around him. Of course, these first attempts fell short of being scholarly, probably consisting of a few grunts and snorts at best. As time passed on, though, these ideas persisted and were eventually tackled by the more intellectual, so-called philosophers. Thus, excavation of the external world began. As the authoritarinism of the ancients gave way to the more liberal views of the modernists, two main positions concerning epistemology and the nature of the world arose. The first view was exemplified by ...
    Related: george berkeley, john locke, david hume, david, perception
  • George Berkley: His View Of God - 1,304 words
    ... we perceive through sense experience. Just as these objects do not possess any primary or secondary qualities, they also can not have the ability to cause change in something else. In fact, these tertiary qualities are also ideas perceived only in the mind. Given that objects are ideas and humans possess minds to perceive them with, the nature of both ideas and minds deserves careful consideration. Berkeley assumes the view that ideas are passive and only perceivable in a mind. He goes on to state that these ideas are existent only when a mind is perceiving them. This is logical, for when something is not being ruminated upon it does not exist in the realm of knowledge at that particula ...
    Related: george berkeley, another country, human mind, sunday morning, purely
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