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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: hurston

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  • Hurston Novels - 1,247 words
    Hurston Novels The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s is a great time for black artists; it is a rebirth of art, music, books and poetry. In Zora Neale Hurstons novel Their Eyes Were Watching God Janie, the protagonist, is treated kindly for a black women. She does not go through the torment of black culture during that era or the previous eras. Throughout the book Hurston "fibs" about racial oppression. Janie gets respect by the white people she encounters. Hurston makes the reader imagine that African-American life is easygoing. Richard Writes critique of Their Eyes Were Watching God is accurate and therefore, the book should not be included in the Harlem Renaissance. Hurston breaks several o ...
    Related: hurston, novels, african american, american life, diction
  • Hurston, Zora How It Feels To Be Colored Me My Bag - 418 words
    Hurston, Zora How It Feels to Be Colored Me My Bag English Lit./Comp. Perhaps one of the most profound pieces of African American short story literature is Zora Hurstons' How It Feels to Be Colored Me. In the conclusion of her short story, Hurston depicts her own life experiences through the personification of a brown bag and its contents. To detail my life through mere contents of a paper bag is a difficult task, however, I am a simple man among many, trying not to drown in an ocean of complexity more commonly known as society. My bag is comprised of many objects, some which I have yet to use and others that have already expired. The first content inside my bag is a pack of wet matches that ...
    Related: zora, african american, listening skills, the bible, keen
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God By Zora Neale Hurston - 1,510 words
    Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston "I am Me, My Eyes Toward God" Zora Neale Hurston an early twentieth century Afro-American feminist author, was raised in a predominately black community which gave her an unique perspective on race relations, evident in her novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God. Hurston drew on her on experiences as a feminist Afro-American female to create a story about the magical transformation of Janie, from a young unconfident girl to a thriving woman. Janie experiences many things that make her a compelling character who takes readers along as her companion, on her voyage to discover the mysteries and rewards life has to offer. Zora Neale Hurston was, th ...
    Related: hurston, neale, neale hurston, their eyes were watching god, zora, zora hurston, zora neale hurston
  • 100 Years Of Degradation - 1,060 words
    100 Years Of Degradation Students were assigned this essay as an inside look at oppression and racism from the last one hundred years, told by two elderly ladies in the book, Having Our Say. 100 Years of Degradation There are several books that have to be read in English 095. Having Our Say is one of them. My advice is to read this book while you are still in 090 or 094, just to get the advantage. These are some things that you will discover in this extraordinary biography. This book is tough to take as humorous, because its heart-wrenching to look at racism in America, but Having Our Say, manages to pull off the feat. Having Our Say really makes you think and tries to somehow reflect on the ...
    Related: degradation, public school system, rights movement, school teacher, negro
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,737 words
    Awakening Eyes Awakening Eyes With few exceptions, our male dominated society has traditionally feared, repressed, and stymied the growth of women. As exemplified in history, man has always enjoyed a superior position. According to Genesis in the Old Testament, the fact that man was created first has led to the perception that man should rule. However, since woman was created from man's rib, there is a strong argument that woman was meant to work along side with man as an equal partner. As James Weldon Johnson's poem, "Behold de Rib," clearly illustrates, if God had intended for woman to be dominated, then she would have been created from a bone in the foot, but "he took de bone out of his s ...
    Related: awakening, the awakening, their eyes were watching god, self determination, role model
  • Awakening Eyes - 1,771 words
    ... t Joe requires her total submission [. . .] she retains a clear perception of herself and her situation that becomes her salvation in the end" (Wall 386). Initiating the process of stepping outside of herself and assessing her situation is the impetus for Janie to finally act in ways to improve her life. Joe's restriction "short circuits Janie's attempt to claim an identity of her own, robs her of the opportunity to negotiate respect from her peers. 'So gradually, she pressed her teeth together and learned to hush,'" but not for long (Wall 386). Finally, Janie steps up and initiates a new attitude. In her first confrontation with Joe, she declares that "Ah knows uh few things, and womenf ...
    Related: awakening, final phase, self assessment, book reports, absolute
  • Biography Of Langston Hughes - 940 words
    Biography Of Langston Hughes Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, in 1902. His father, who had studied to become a lawyer, left for Mexico shortly after the baby was born. When Langston was seven or eight he went to live with his grandmother, who told him wonderful stories about Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth and took him to hear Booker T. Washington. She also introduced him to The Crisis, edited by W.E.B. Du Bois, who also wrote The Souls of Black Folk, young Langston's favorite book. After his grandmother died when he was twelve, Langston went to live with her friends, whom he called Auntie and Uncle Reed. Then, at age fourteen, his mother married again, and soon he accomp ...
    Related: biography, hughes, langston, langston hughes, claude mckay
  • Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1,878 words
    Black Boy And Their Eyes Were Watching God I. Abstract This paper examines the drastic differences in literary themes and styles of Richard Wright and Zora Neale Hurston, two African--American writers from the early 1900's. The portrayals of African-American women by each author are contrasted based on specific examples from their two most prominent novels, Native Son by Wright, and Their Eves Were Watching God by Hurston. With the intent to explain this divergence, the autobiographies of both authors (Black Boy and Dust Tracks on a Road) are also analyzed. Particular examples from the lives of each author are cited to demonstrate the contrasting lifestyles and experiences that created these ...
    Related: black boy, black woman, black women, most black, their eyes were watching god
  • Feeling Humiliated And Degraded, Jews Have Fought For Freedom During The Holocaust Even Now, Albanians Are Fighting For Freed - 888 words
    Feeling humiliated and degraded, Jews have fought for freedom during the Holocaust. Even now, Albanians are fighting for freedom from Serbians in the Middle East. Fighting for freedom is a ubiquitous scene that pivots from a will to gain liberation of one's body, mind, and soul. Despite all the effort, many fail when faced with stagnation, and often never dream of being free again. The main characters Ethan Frome and Janie Crawford, in the novels Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton and Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, serve as exemplars of the fight for freedom. Both characters lead dismal and unsatisfied lives and struggle against their fate, spouses, and society, to be with the ...
    Related: holocaust, jews, neale hurston, middle east, lonely
  • Harlem Renaissance - 701 words
    Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance Period (1919-1940) included many outstanding features and writers which made for a wonderful cache of literary works by African American writers. There was an unprecidented variety and scope of publications by African Americans which brought about a new sense of purpose, confidence, and achievement unusual to many black artists due to thier troubled history. This led to thier irresistable impulse to create boldly expressive art of high quality. The 1920's saw the first significant amount of publishing of works by black artists since the turn of the century. Migration to the north seemed a necessity due to the more and more intolerable hiring conditio ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, renaissance period, weldon johnson
  • Harlem Renissance - 424 words
    Harlem Renissance The Writers of the Harlem Renaissance Throughout my research of the Harlem Renaissance I learned many things I previously didn't know. One aspect of the Harlem RENAISSANCE that I researched was the author Zora Neale Hurston, and her contributions to the period. I learned much about the black influence on writing while doing this project. The Harlem Renaissance took place between the years of 1916 and 1940. During this time there occurred to be an artistic and intellectual revolution in Back America. It said to be driven by political and economic circumstances in the United States. That what the Harlem Renissance was based on many influential blacks showing their talents and ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, black family, zora hurston, renaissance
  • Lift Every Voice And Sing By James Weldon Johnson - 1,551 words
    Lift Every Voice And Sing By James Weldon Johnson The author of Lift Every Voice and Sing (often called the Negro National Anthem), James Weldon Johnson had a long career as a creative writer, black leader, teacher, lawyer, diplomat, and executive secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Through his writing he protested racial injustice, encouraged black achievement, and added immeasurably to the wealth of American literary art. A native of Jacksonville, Florida, Johnson attended Atlanta University through graduate school. In 1901 he became the first African American admitted to the Florida Bar, but he did not re-main in Florida very long. Forming a creati ...
    Related: james weldon johnson, johnson, lift, sing, weldon, weldon johnson
  • Love And Color - 1,747 words
    Love And Color Is love colorblind? Just three decades ago, Thurgood Marshall was only months away from appoint- ment to the Supreme Court when he suffered an indignity that today seems not just outrageous but almost incomprehensible. He and his wife had found their dream house in a Virginia suburb of Washington, D.C., but could not lawfully live together in that state: he was black and she was Asian. Fortunately for the Marshalls, in January 1967 the Supreme Court struck down the anti-interracial-marriage laws in Virginia and 18 other states. And in 1967 these laws were not mere leftover scraps from an extinct era. Two years before, at the crest of the civil-rights revolution, a Gallup poll ...
    Related: true love, mass media, karl marx, self esteem, unmarried
  • Passing By Nella Larsen - 870 words
    Passing By Nella Larsen Nella Larsen's novel, Passing, provides an example of some of the best writing the Harlem Renaissance has to offer. Nella Larsen was one of the most promising young writer's of her time. Though she only published two novels it is clear that she was one of the most important writers of the Harlem Renaissance movement. Her career as writer probably would have lasted longer, but she was accused of plagiarizing her short story, Sanctuary. She was eventually cleared of any wrong doing, but the accusation deeply tarnished her reputation as writer. It is truly a shame that the first African-American woman to win the Guggenheim Fellowship was forced out of writing by scandal. ...
    Related: larsen, passing, racial identity, countee cullen, lonely
  • Phillis Wheatley, One Of America's Most Profound Writers, Has Contributed Greatly To American Literature, Not Only As A Wr - 1,647 words
    Phillis Wheatley, one of America's most profound writers, has contributed greatly to American literature, not only as a writer, but as an African American woman, who has influenced many African Americans by enriching their knowledge of and exposure to their Negro heritage and Negro literature. As one of America's most renown writers, Wheatley, said to be the mother of African American Literature, is best known for her sympathetic portrayals of African American thought. Wheatley's literary contributions are vast in nature and distinguish her apart from most writers of her era. Her writings have helped in the molding of the African American tradition and are favored by people of all ethnic bac ...
    Related: african american, african american history, african american literature, american, american freedom, american heritage, american history
  • Repression Of Nanny's Death In Their Eyes Were Watching God - 397 words
    Repression of Nanny's Death in Their Eyes Were Watching God L.R.G. Why did Zora Neale Hurston choose to move away from the subject of Nanny's death so quickly in Their Eyes Were Watching God? For one, she did it to refrain from revealing any weaknesses in Janie's character. The book as a whole seems to empower women, especially Janie, the main character. Portraying Janie in mourning, weeping, or being depressed over her grandmother's death would surely not embody this powerful, independent version of a woman. Instead, it would show that she is weak and emotional in troubled times and this would make her the stereotypical woman. Hurston was not trying to portray a stereotypical woman in her n ...
    Related: repression, their eyes were watching god, zora neale hurston, neale hurston, grieve
  • The Harlem Renaissance - 1,150 words
    The Harlem Renaissance Or the New Negro Movement The dawn of the 1920s ushered in an African American artistic and cultural movement, the likes of which have never and will likely never be seen again. Beginning as a series of literary discussions in Greenwich Village and Harlem, the "New Negro Movement" (later dubbed the Harlem Renaissance by Alain Locke) came to exalt the unique culture of African Americans and redefine African American expression. The movement spread throughout all areas of the arts and humanities, gaining a wider audience as it went along. Soon it became more than just an artistic movement, it was at the same time a social ideal. The authors and artists of the era simulta ...
    Related: harlem, harlem renaissance, renaissance, american identity, neale hurston
  • The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance - 2,481 words
    The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance The People, Leisure, and Culture of Blacks During the Harlem Renaissance It seems unfair that the pages of our history books or even the lecturers in majority of classrooms speak very little of the accomplishments of blacks. They speak very little of a period within black history in which many of the greatest musicians, writers, painters, and influential paragon' emerged. This significant period in time was known as the Harlem Renaissance. Blacks attained the opportunity to work at upper-class jobs, own their own homes, and establish status among themselves. To no ones surprise, they still were not accepted into the so ...
    Related: black african, black american, black experience, black history, black music, black nationalist, black people
  • The People, Leisure, And Cultures Of Blacks During The Harlem Renaissance - 2,599 words
    ... ed Claude McKay, Harlem was the first positive reaction that most Blacks saw to American Life. It was compared to a paradise filled with beautiful, strong joyous, Black people that were enjoying life. He worked several jobs in Harlem but he continuously ceased to observe the greatness of his people, in turn taking out the time to write poetry expressing all that he was witnessing every spare chance he got. Langston Hughes, one of the most extraordinary writers of all time, wrote as a young Negro artist, for himself and the other Negro artists, that this was their time to express the uniqueness of their individuality of their dark- skinned selves without feeling anything but pride and acc ...
    Related: black community, black history, black people, black race, black woman, black women, blacks
  • The Question Of Pure Optimism In Their Eyes Were Watching God - 1,180 words
    The Question Of Pure Optimism In Their Eyes Were Watching God In Their Eyes Were Watching God Janie goes through several relationships before [s]he pulled in her horizon like a great fish net. Pulled it from around the waist of the world and draped it over her shoulder (p. 184). In other words, not all the experiences that helped her to gain control of her life were positive ones. These experiences can be put into one of four relationships: Nanny, Logan Killicks, Jody Starks, and Tea Cake. No doubt that Nanny loved Janie a great deal, and naturally she wanted her granddaughter to have security beyond an old woman who would inevitably die. She also wanted more opportunities for Janie than she ...
    Related: optimism, their eyes were watching god, logan killicks, alice walker, hurston
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